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The Beatles Pt 1

Posted by Amoebite, August 12, 2009 12:46pm | Post a Comment
We are kicking off the celebration today in honor of the digitally remastered Beatles reissues set to hit Amoeba September 9! Each Wednesday from now until September 2, we will present a segment of The Beatles' biography. Then, the week of September 2-9 will be marked here on the blog with a number of Beatles related posts with a huge variety of topics! We begin now with Part One of the fabled band's history:

the beatles 1962

“This isn’t show business,” John Lennon said at the height of The Beatles’ success. “This is something else.”

Strictly in show business terms, the quartet from Liverpool, England rewrote the book on rock ‘n’ roll, which prior to the group’s 1962 recording debut was considered nothinbeatles for saleg more than disposable music for idle teens. While The Beatles were initially embraced by throngs of young fans (most of them female) -- in a phenomenon dubbed “Beatlemania” by the press -- with the same fervor previously accorded Frank Sinatra in the ‘40s and Elvis Presley in the ‘50s, the depth of their work quickly transcended their teen-idol genesis.

The songs penned by singer-guitarist Lennon and his collaborator, vocalist-bassist Paul McCartney – and, to a lesser extent, those authored by guitarist-vocalist George Harrison – expanded rock’s expressive capabilities, and broadened the audience for the music beyond its youthful base. Their producer George Martin transmuted The Beatles’ bold imaginative leaps in the studio, bringing theretofore unimaginable musical and technical textures to their recorded music. After sensationally announcing themselves with a string of irresistible hit singles that were greeted with unprecedented sales (which persisted until the end of the group’s existence), The Beatles established the long-playing album as the principal commercial format, and as a forum for artistic expression. And their massive popularity on a global scale inaugurated the era of the stadium concert. In sheer magnitude, their achievement remains unrivaled to this day.

Continue reading...

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: thenewno2

Posted by Amoebite, March 30, 2009 06:12pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella Lineupthenewno2

Day #14 - Artist #14 - thenewno2 (pronounced "the new number two"):

Thenewno2

Paul McCartney is not going to be the only one with Beatle blood on stage at this year's Coachella. On Saturday April 18, 2009, thenewno2 are prepared to grab the baton from where the "quiet one" unfortunately handed it off much too early. Dhani Harrison, son of the late great George Harrison, along with longtime friend and musical partner Oliver Hecks, comprise the creative mind of thenewno2. The result is the accomplished debut album, You Are Here, released tomorrow, March 31st, that sounds like what one would expect if post-Beatles George joined Radiohead. Dhani never gives the impression that he's trying to be a Beatle, but he definitely hasn't forgotten that he is the son of one.

40th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BEATLES' WHITE ALBUM

Posted by Billyjam, November 23, 2008 10:54am | Post a Comment
the white album
Beatles
fans take note: in recognition of the 40th anniversary of the release of The Beatles' White Album (in actuality their self-titled album), "the producers, engineers and technicians who worked on the LP recall their contributions" in a recommended documentary special by the BBC in celebration of the double LP set that was originally released on November 22nd, 1968 and was the fab four's ninth studio album.

Click here to check it out. Note that you will need Real Player in your computer. Meantime, check out some White Album related video footage (including some rehearsal/recording sessions) of John, Paul, George, & Ringo down below the track listing & YouTube album audio medley (immediately below). Luckily I found a copy of the album for just a dollar in the used vinyl bin at the Amoeba Music Berkeley store some years back (a numbered copy and in good condition too!). It is also available on CD-- both new and used. Get it if you don't already own it. And buy it at Amoeba!


 
THE BEATLES' WHITE ALBUM TRACK LISTING:

SIDE A:

Pattie Boyd - Harrison & Clapton's Former Wife Finally Speaks

Posted by Miss Ess, January 20, 2008 07:08pm | Post a Comment
At long last, Pattie Boyd has written a book!


I read it last weekend.  It's entitled Wonderful Tonight and it's quite a page turner.

You'll remember Pattie Boyd-- she's the beautiful blond who met George Harrison on the set of A Hard Day's Night and married him a few years later.  She lived the high life, literally, during the entire height of Beatlemania and beyond.  She and George discovered India and meditation together. Years after all that, Eric Clapton came a-calling, wrote "Layla" for her and soon she was Mrs. Clapton...until all that ended unhappily in divorce as well.

Her story is one that I have always wanted to know more about.  There are plenty of juicy details in this book!  Perhaps I was hoping for even more juice though, seeing as this woman lived through some of the most exciting musical times right in the vortex of the whole thing.  Her writing is a bit polite, a bit hesitant, but the book is still a good one, still highly readable.

Pattie Boyd grew up in Africa, and moved back to England when she was about 10 or so.  She ended up a model, working with Twiggy and for Vogue, among many other publications.  When she met George, she was swept away by his charm and fame.  (Who wouldn't have been?)   In the book she recounts their many years together with affection, but also notes that eventually a pattern emerged:  for a few months George would become so absorbed in his meditation and Eastern Thought that he would neglect everything around him, and then he would go completely the other direction and party so hard she lost respect for him.  Then he'd turn back to transcendental meditation again for a while, and so on.  During one of his party phases, he declared his love for Maureen Starkey, Ringo's wife, and Pattie had had quite enough. (Ringo was not pleased either.)

When Eric Clapton began writing her fiery love letters, she found herself unable to resist him.  Unfortunately, despite the fact that he was very obviously a raging alcoholic, she moved in with him and quickly married him.  His relentless alcoholism kept her from ever knowing really who the real Clapton was.

It is interesting that she reports that her main regret in life is not standing up for herself in her first marriage.  She feels she should never have left George.  [I read an interview with Clapton recently where he also says his regret is messing with the Harrison marriage.]  Also, not being able to have children has haunted her all her life, and she writes extensively about her anguish over being childless.

Boyd seems to have lost herself continually in her relationships.  She played the part of the dutiful wife, although she was in the midst of the 60s/70s feminist movements.  Seeing as she was married to two gale force personalities who lived quite draining and drug/drink addled lives, she wanted to steady the boat.  She aimed to please, to hang on to her man at all costs.  She paid a price for this, as she ended up twice divorced and having to pick up the pieces and discover who she truly is in her 50s.  Her life story shows how easy it is to continue making the same mistake (in her case, marrying attractive, successful, highly addicted musicians) until one finally learns the err of her enabling ways.  The addiction is what ultimately corroded her relationships.

The most  compelling portions of the book for me were when she describes The Beatles' stay in India with the Maharishi and when Eric's young son (by another woman-- this portion of the book is kind of agonizing), Connor, dies.

Despite the fact that sometimes I felt this must be the PG-13 version of what her life actually entailed, I enjoyed reading the book.  Pattie comes across as a shy, intimidated girl who literally got lucky and rode this luck all her life.  Who can really blame her? She's still likable, and she has intimate knowledge of two of the most celebrated musicians of all time, which at last she has been kind enough to share (

The Employee Interview XIII: Kaitlin

Posted by Miss Ess, December 18, 2007 03:56pm | Post a Comment

Kaitlin
4 years employment
Photographer Extraordinaire

ME:  What was the first thing (band/song/moment) that got you into music-- like, really into music? 

KL: The Beatles and The Beach Boys are my earliest music memories.  Actually, I still have a Shirley Temple record that was the one record I would beg my dad to play for me.  “The Good Ship Lollipop” was my song!

ME:  Seeing as you are one of the biggest Beatles fans currently working here, I think this is a really important question for you:  Who is your favorite Beatle and why?

KL:  George.  I wept the day he died.  I think I always identified with him.  John was wonderful, but in a more outspoken way, whereas George was always thoughtful and understated.  He lived his live quietly and peacefully.  I once cut a quote out of a magazine where George tells what he said to the intruder who stabbed him at home: “I just shouted 'Hare krishna, hare krishna!'”  Oh, George.

ME: Yeah he really was the Dark Horse.  Which Beatles track is your favorite?

KL:  Well, there is a different answer every day, but “For You Blue” on Let It Be is one of my favorite George tracks.  “Cry Baby Cry” on the White Album.  “I’m Only Sleeping” on Revolver-- I dig the backwards guitar.

ME:  One of the more underrated George songs in my opinion is "Long Long Long."  I think it gets lost on the White Album cause there's so much else that commands attention on there.  Do you have a favorite ex- Beatle solo album?

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