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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile

Posted by Amoebite, May 22, 2018 01:55pm | Post a Comment

Courtney Barnett & Kurt Vile What's In My Bag?

What happens when indie rock singer/songwriters and collaborators Courtney Barnett and Kurt Vile go record shopping for each other? Well, halfway through our What's In My Bag? interview it became apparent that almost every record Vile picked for Barnett was sure to make her cry. "This is the best record. You listen to this in the morning and you will cry," Vile said pulling out Days Have Gone By - Volume 6 by the revered fingerstyle guitarist John Fahey. Another sad classic for Vile was Townes Van Zandt's Flying Shoes. "This is my favorite record by this iconic, sad artist. The title track will kill you." When we noticed Vile's melancholy theme, Barnett replied, "Good, I love it. I love crying." 

Courtney Barnett is an Australian singer-songwriter known for her deadpan, slacker style. After playing with garage/grunge band Rapid Transit and psych/country band Immigrant Union, Barnett founded the Lotta Sea Licelabel Milk! Records and released her first solo EP, I've Got a Friend Called Emily Ferris, in 2012. Her next EP, 2013's How to Carve a Rose into a Carrot, won praise around the world. That year she performed at CMJ and played a several European dates, eventually releasing both EPs together as The Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas. She released her debut full-length, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. Her second LP, Tell Me How You Really Feel was released in May 2018.

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New "What's in My Bag?" Episode with Monsieur Perine

Posted by Amoebite, June 27, 2016 05:12pm | Post a Comment

Monsieur Perine Amoeba Music What's In My Bag?

When Monsieur Perine go record shopping they don't just stick to one or two sections, they tear through the whole store. So when the Colombian trio came to Amoeba Hollywood recently they ended up with a huge and eclectic mix of music, which included everything from African percussive folk music, big band jazz, and Fleetwood Mac.

Monsieur Perine meld Django Reinhardt-style swing, Latin-American music, and jazz to create what they call "swing Colombian style." They took home the Latin GRAMMY for Best New Artist in 2015. The band consists of Catalina Garcia (vocals), Nicolas Junca (guitar), and Santiago Prieto (guitar, violin, charango).

The Bogota-based band's debut album, Hecho a Mano, was certified gold in their home country when it was released in 2012, with the award-winning Caja de Musica following three years later. Produced by Calle 13's Eduardo Cabra (aka Visitante), the LP features guest appearances from Mexican alt-rockers Cafe Tacuba and Dominican singer-songwriter Vicente Garcia. This summer, Monsieur Perine are playing select dates in Europe and North America. Catch them August 5 in Oakland at The New Parish, and August 7 in Los Angeles at The Echoplex.

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(In which we consider some swinging, singing sisters.)

Posted by Job O Brother, May 16, 2011 01:26pm | Post a Comment

 
WAR!
The Boswell Sisters vs. The Andrews Sisters


Last blog, we took a long, almost invasive and menacing look at one of my favorite harmonizing groups, The Ravens. This time, let’s meditate on two groups and the epic chaos that emerged from their earth-shattering battle for supremacy. Yes, we’re going to focus on the blood-thirsty Boswell Sisters and those daughters of doomsday, The Andrews Sisters. (This blog is not for the squeamish and will include death, destruction, and delightfully catchy melodies.)

Many people are already familiar with The Andrews Sisters, and because you, dear reader, are a person, I am including you in this assessment. What these same many people often don’t realize is that The Andrews Sisters actually based their act on another trio of singing siblings, The Boswell Sisters.

The Boswell Sisters were born in the first decade of the twentieth century and, in a show of musical savvy, they chose to be raised in New Orleans, the American music Mecca. By their teens, Martha, Connee, and Helvetia (they were given individual names to make communication in the house more efficient) began singing in movie theatres and on local radio shows, cultivating small celebrity and earning free popcorn.

By the early 1930’s their desire for greater success, along with Helvetia’s having developed a corn allergy, led them to move to New York City. They recorded some records and integrated themselves in the thriving jazz scene. Middle-child Connee proved herself to be a deft and original arranger of music and, against the common practice of the day, was allowed greater freedom to change the standards she and her sisters sang. This earned her respect among her musical peers, even though some choices Connee made were less popular than others. (For example, their 1931 recording of I Thank You, Mr. Moon, in which Connee changed the key of the melody and re-wrote the words as I Will Slit Your Shaking Throat and Drink Your Hot Gushing Blood, Mr. Moon - it was subsequently changed back to the original lyrics.)

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Christmas Gangs and Santa's Village

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, December 22, 2009 12:05pm | Post a Comment


This Lawrence Welk record inspired me to dig up a little classic LW for your viewing pleasure. It's listed as a "gang" number, a term not usually associated with these kinds of groups. I have a Bing Crosby LP that is a collection of gang songs as well. Below we have Mitch Miller, who was perhaps the most popular of said gang leaders.







The Holiday In Song LP features a great shot of Santa's Village. I have very fuzzy rememberances of visiting the village when I was very small. Check out this excellent website detailing the whole Santa's Village experience. I've included a few minutes of the K. Gordon Murray holiday classic Santa's Enchanted Village, which was filmed on location at the Riverside SV.





Lawrence Welk and the Gang



Santa's Enchanted Village

MY FUNNY VALENTINE

Posted by Billyjam, February 14, 2009 11:44am | Post a Comment
chuck mangione my funny valentine
Long a jazz standard, the beautiful song "My Funny Valentine," which originally was unveiled to the world as a show tune in the 1937 Broadway musical Babes In Arms by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, has remained a most popular song for musicians, especially vocalists, to cover ever since-- the song has reportedly appeared on over 1300 albums to date, and still counting.

Artists who have covered the song over the years include Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Elvis Costello, Nico, Rufus Wainwright, Sarah Vaughan, Chuck Mangione, Chaka Khan, Stan Getz, Dolly Parton, Chet Baker (who scored the first major hit with the song), Miles Davis (who in 1964 released the live album My Funny Valentine recorded at a concert at Lincoln Center, NYC), Tony Bennett, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis, Jr., Van Morrisomy funny valentinen (off his 1994 LP A Night In San Francisco), Carly Simon, and Etta James (Kanye West sampled her version on the song "Addiction" on his album Late Registration).

Although the song was first performed in 1937 in Babes In Arms on Broadway, where it ran for an impressive 289 performances, it wouldn't be recorded for another 8 years when the first record release of the song by Hal McIntyre with vocals by Ruth Gaylor briefly charted in 1945.

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