Amoeblog

Birthday Week Part 2: Rosemary Clooney, Maxwell, and Robert Moog

Posted by Billyjam, May 23, 2017 10:38pm | Post a Comment

In continuation of yesterday's Amoeblog tribute to Morrissey's 58th birthday and the Amoeba Music one-day storewide 20% off sale on all Morrissey and The Smiths product to celebrate the date, we continue the birthday theme today by honoring three diverse artists whose birthday fell on this date of May 23rd: Rosemary Clooney, Maxwell, and Robert Moog. In the case of the latter artist/creator, whose legacy was celebrated over this past weekend with the annual MoogFest in North Carolina, select music artists whose careers were influenced by the moog synth creator will also be celebrated in this second birthday week Amoeblog installment.   Note tomorrow Wednesday, May 24th, Bob Dylan's 76th birthday will be celebrated with both a tribute Amoeblog as well as  one-day 20% off instore sale on the artist's releases And then on Friday this week, May 26th: birth date of the late Miles Davis,  the jazz great's legacy will similarly be celebrated in this one-week series.
Born on this date in 1934 and died in August 2005 at age 75,  Robert Moog was the inventor of the Moog synthesizer five and a half decades ago and, as such, widely credited with being a pioneer of electronic music.  It was in 1965 when the Moog company rolled out the commercially available modular voltage-controlled analog synthesizer systems. The radical musical creation would alter and help shape the course of popular music over the next half century. His electronic synthesizer keyboard instrument, that originally cost $11,000, counted among its earliest owners The Beatles, Sun Ra, and Mick Jagger after its introduction at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. As noted by such academics as Cornell University professor of Science and Technology Studies, Trevor Pinch Moog's creation and his name are often mispronounced. Moog rhymes with "rogue" not with "fugue" as it has repeatedly been mispronounced dating back to its earliest usage.

Among the earliest artists associated with the history of the Moog synth included Walter Carlos (later Wendy Carlos), Diana Ross & The Supremes, The Doors, and The Byrds followed by such others as  Rick Wakeman of Yes, Keith Emerson, Kraftwerk, and Gary Numan. Another fan of using the Moog synth, although not often associated with the instrument, was Bob Marley, But it was the aforementioned Walter / Wendy Carlos provided many music fans first introduction to the Moog with 1968 release of the crossover classical album Switched-On Bach which reworked Bach's pieces on this then new instrument. But in terms of the first big pop hit for the Moog as the main instrumentation, that occurred a few years later with the 1972 international pop hit single "Popcorn" by Hot Butter (song below) which was actually a cover of the song Gershon Kingsley wrote and first recorded in 1969 for his album Music to Moog By and done by numerous other artists including Jean-Michel Jarre who was recently featured on the Amoeblog for his WIMB? appearance.

Nejla Ates: the Exquisite Turkish Delight

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 27, 2017 08:48pm | Post a Comment

Nejla Ates

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


Nejla Ates"She had a ruby on her tummy and a diamond big as Texas on her toe
She let her hair down and she did the hoochie-coochie real slow
When she did her special number on the zebra skin
I thought she'd stop the show…"
~ "Little Egypt" by The Coasters

If you have flipped through Middle East or Belly Dancing records, you most likely have seen her…for she is hard to miss. As Sandra Warner was the enchantress for Martin Denny’s album covers, Nejla Ates, “the Turkish Delight,” was the “Honk-honk, hubba-hubba, Ee chee wa waa!” album cover model of Middle Eastern records in the 1950s.

A fellow Pisces, born March 7, 1932, Nejla lived a life of wild seduction, exotic belly dancing, and love drama. (If you are a Pisces too, join the Bay Area Pisces Power group on Facebook!) Dancing at night clubs around the world in the 1950s, Nejla was said to have "left a trail of broken hearts from Istanbul to the Bronx, with stops in Paris, Miami, and Las Vegas.”

Princes, oil tycoons, famous singers, and actors would fall madly in love with her, knowing full well that her side-hobby was stealing taken men, even from Zsa Zsa Gabor.

Easy Listening Records for Modern Day Witches

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 2, 2017 06:38pm | Post a Comment

Witchcraft Easy Listening

Elizabeth Montgomery
Samantha (Elizabeth Montgomery) 

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


 

"It's such an ancient pitch,
But one I wouldn't switch,
Cause there's no nicer witch than you."

~ "Witchcraft" by Cy Coleman


Have you ever wondered what kind of music Samantha listened to in her steamy green bubble bath while fantasizing about Anton LaVey (this is before she ended up marrying that mortal goober Darrin Stephens)? She listened to Ruth Welcome's Zither Magic LP of course...music so relaxing, it could reverse any curse.



Before The Sonics were warning you about girls with long black hair and big black cars, with their guitarsCy Coleman, Witchcraft going chonk-chonk, chonk-chonk, chonk, Cy Coleman was telling you to go for them!

This Guy's In Love With You

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, November 3, 2013 10:28pm | Post a Comment


Herb Albert & The Tijuana Brass-"This Guy's In Love With You"
From the album, The Beat Of The Brass
Written By
Burt Bacharach and Hal David

This song brings back my earliest childhood memories.

 My sisters were old enough to attend school and I was still too young, even for the Head Start program. I stayed with my mother as she worked from home sewing wedding dresses for a bridal shop in Gardena. To keep her company, she would put the radio on a easy listening station that was dominated by Burt Bacharach compositions.

Easy does it.

Posted by Job O Brother, February 7, 2011 06:14pm | Post a Comment

One of the most rewarding and confounding things about being an Earthling who loves music is watching my tastes change with time, or better said, watching them grow – I don’t think there’s very much music I once loved I no longer do. My first favorite acts (at age 3) were The Beatles, Linda Ronstadt, and The Chipmunks, and I still adore them all today.

More surprising to me is how much I’ve come to cherish music I would have once loathed. 2010 became the year I “discovered” easy listening, both light music (which can be found in Amoeba Music's classical section) and lounge music (which can be found in the coincidentally-named Lounge section).

It all started with a bandleader named Robert Farnon. I was drawn in by his album covers, which evoked lush, darkly romantic landscapes and liaisons reminiscent of a Douglas Sirk film.

Perhaps it was city living that led me to lust for light listening – a kind of escapism from the constant soundscape of waves of traffic, the bling and bursts of cell-phones, and the startling pitch of people’s dreams breaking into billions of bits. For whatever reason, impulsively, I gave an album of Robert Farnon’s a spin while I worked, and found myself enveloped in ease – my imagination drifted into sweet scenes as each suite seemed to sweep me off my feet – I was a fourteen year old girl writing of new, naïve love in her totally boring diary.

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