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Marin County's DocLands Documentary Film Festival, May 10-14

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 1, 2017 07:56pm | Post a Comment

Doclands Film Festival

Presented by the California Film Institute, the inaugural DocLands Documentary Film Festival will run in Marin County May 10–14. DocLands is a non-competitive and inclusive festival that will showcase documentary film in a variety of genres and with a diversity of content, highlighting films that transcend the traditional definition of the documentary.

Amoeba Music is proud to be part of the first-ever DocLands, sponsoring these two unique films:

NariNari
Wednesday, May 10, 7pm at Smith Rafael Film Center
DocLands Documentary Film Festival kicks off with the California premiere of Nari, a stunning short documentary blending film, archival footage, and animation accompanied by live narration and an original score featuring vocals, Indian percussion, and Gingger Shankar's unique double violin, with Carlo Ribaux on drums and Vivek Maddala on guitar and keyboard. Nari tells the life stories of the two extraordinary artists who helped bring Indian music to the West in the 1970s through their close collaboration with Ravi Shankar and The Beatles' George Harrison. Tickets.

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Korla Pandit, the Grand Mogul of Exotica

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 20, 2016 05:59pm | Post a Comment

Korla Pandit

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show

Kai and Korla
The author, relaxing.

"For wisdom is better than rubies, and all things to be desired are not to be compared unto it. We bring you musical gems from near and far, blended into a pattern of glorious harmony."
~ Opening monologue of Korla Pandit's Adventures In Music television show

Are you still seeking for that magical present for your favorite Auntie Zuki-Neenee? Well, seek no further, for your quest triumphantly ends here! And the gift you ask? The newly-released documentary Korla on DVD!

Directed by folk art lover John Turner and produced by Eric Christensen, this documentary takes you into the mysterious world and history of Korla Pandit (minus Korla's famous "couch-hopping" that's said he did with female fans in his later years...that ol' moochie suave smoothie). The two filmmakers even got August 20th to be officially recognized as Korla Pandit Day with a proclamation from the City of San Francisco back in 2015.

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SF's Balboa & Vogue Theaters Celebrate Music Documentaries This May

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 30, 2015 01:48pm | Post a Comment

This May, it's all about music documentaries at the historic Balboa Theatre and Vogue Theatre and we think that rocks.

Vogue Theatre is honoring the late, great director Albert Maysles (1926 - 2015) with a festival of his films May 8 - 14. Two of the 17 films featured are his rock doc classics Gimme Shelter and Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out. These are a MUST for any Rolling Stones fan and aficionado of concert films. Get your tickets and find out more about the Albert Maysles Memorial Film Festival here!

Gimme ShelterGimme Shelter
Saturday, May 9. 12:30pm, 3:30pm, 7:00pm
Gimme Shelter is the landmark documentary about the Rolling Stones US tour of 1969 that ended tragically at the ill-fated free concert at Altamont Speedway on December 6, 1969.

Get Yer Ya-Yas Out!
Saturday, May 9. 10:30pm
Thursday, May 14. 9:30pm
A rarely-seen chronicle of The Rolling Stones’ epic performance at Madison Square Garden in November 1969. Albert Maysles has put together never-before seen archive footage that shows the band at its height, wowing New York audiences.

Balboa Theatre screens two soon-to-be classic documentaries with Her Aim Is True, Karen Whitehead's look into the life of rock photographer Jini Dellaccio, on May 6th and John Pirozzi's celebration of the incredible rock and roll that came from Cambodia, Don't Think I've Forgotten: Cambodia's Lost Rock and Roll, May 8 - 14. Get your tickets now!

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San Francisco International Film Festival Features Cibo Matto Live & More

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 14, 2015 05:12pm | Post a Comment

The 58th San Francisco International Film Festival runs April 23 – May 7 at multiple theaters in SF and at the PFA in Berkeley. This year, SFIFF features some amazing musical events and films along with the nearly 200 films and live events. Here are three not-to-be-missed musical films and events co-sponsored by Amoeba Music.

CIBO MATTO (USA, 2014, 120 min)
May 5, 8:00pm, Castro Theater
Cibo Matto’s hip-hop infused, electro pop burrowed deep into our collective earholes throughout the 1990s, becoming a symbol for the new post-genre musical cool. Experts at establishing mood and always up for an experimental challenge, the duo has developed new musical soundtracks to a number of wild and abstract short movies to be played in this one-time-only performance. Anchoring the screenings are two rare presentations of films made in 1970. First is Yoko Ono's incredible Fluxus epic Fly, which features a fly roaming a woman's body. Second is a modern re-staging of celebrated Bauhaus artist Oskar Schlemmer’s Triadic Ballet—a movie that will blow your mind with its campy costumes, weird choreography, and sheer delight.

LOVE & MERCY (USA, 2014, 120 min)
May 1, 6:15pm, Sundance Kabuki Cinema
May 4, 2:00pm, Sundance Kabuki Cinema
This powerful musical biopic tells Beach Boy Brian Wilson’s dramatically compelling story in—to use ancient recording jargon—two tracks. In the 1960s as the band rides surf music onto the charts, a creatively restless Wilson (Paul Dano) writes the songs that will become Pet Sounds, but alienates himself from other band members. The 1980s Wilson (John Cusack) is a shell-shocked man trying to emerge from an overmedicated isolation with the love and mercy of a good woman.

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Sin You Sinners: Joe Sarno's Civilized Sexploitation

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 9, 2015 05:18pm | Post a Comment

Sin In The Suburbsby Rebecca Burgan

In the wake of the new wave art house boom of the 1960s, sexploitation films and art films mimicked each other’s aesthetics to market to a wider audience. American auteur Joseph W. Sarno (1921-2010) produced a prolific catalog of softcore films in the '60s and '70s. Hoping that the hardcore genre was short-lived, Sarno found his niche in the arty sexploitation world, where dramatic lighting, complex sensitive characters, and female sexuality dominated. His technical skills and quick production time set him apart from other directors in the genre, whereas those with a comparable technique would have gone on to mainstream films. He directed his actors to express their anxieties and passions through realism, capturing gritty sexual emotion in its immediacy. He was a master of sexual cinematic verisimilitude.

Sarno’s films emphasize women’s relationships and women’s pleasure, whereas the men are more objectified as instruments to help achieve the female orgasm—a fairly fresh feminist notion at the time. Visual focus during orgasm was often directed at facial expressions rather than a tight zoom on some tight penetration. The sincerity of the sexual experience is revealed more intimately by the face. Gustav Machaty's 1933 Czechoslovakian art film, Ecstasy, starring Hedy Lamarr, was still pre-Code but was banned in America and in Germany by Hitler. Audiences watched Lamarr’s titillating nude body traipse through the woods and skinny dip in the lake, leading up to a moment of sexual ecstasy revealed only through a close-up on her pained face. The director employed an inspired technique of realism to achieve the right expressions from her—poking her rump off screen with a safety pin. The film was banned because of her scandalously debauched motivation for pleasure: cheating on her gross old husband. The censors decreed, you had to be married to revel in such pleasure and make faces like that. More intimate and revealing than a nude bathing scene, the close-up disturbed the Production Code censors in America, who considered even a safer, morally balanced edit of the film to be too indecent for audiences. The film was basically buried, and Lamarr was only allowed to work again if she cleaned up her act.

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