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Depeche Mode To Reissue Deluxe Numbered Boxed Sets of 12” Singles from Every Album

Posted by Billyjam, June 18, 2018 11:30am | Post a Comment


Depeche Mode vinyl collectors take note: Rhino has announced plans to reissue, via limited edition numbered boxed sets, every Depeche Mode 12” single dating back to their very first 12” single. That February 1981 single, "Dreaming of Me," was the first of 55 singles released by the prolific long running UK electronic rock act. Each forthcoming 12" box set will correspond to the Depeche Mode (DM) album that the singles were originally culled from and will include a bounty of forgotten DM extended remixes.

The first two box sets in this new collector's edition series, that will feature audiophile-quality remastered audio tapes originally cut at Abbey Road Studios, will arrive in Amoeba Music on August 31st with the release of both the 12” singles from the band’s 1981 debut album Speak & Spell (also on LP/vinyl)  and from their 1982 sophomore album A Broken Frame. (also on LP/vinyl). The other 12” box sets will follow next year and in later years according to Rhino. As seen in the images above and below the artwork for each 12” record will be the same as the original single releases while the the exterior of each box set will, according to the label, “draw on street art iconography inspired by the original releases.”

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Ride

Posted by Amoebite, June 14, 2018 12:07pm | Post a Comment

Ride What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Sometimes it takes a special moment to change your perception of a song you've never paid much attention to. In our new What's In My Bag? episode with the shoegaze legends Ride, bassist Steve Queralt recounted listening to music with Erol Alkan, the producer of their latest record, Weather Diaries. "One evening he decided to play 'Eagle' by ABBA, and cranked up the volume," Queralt told us, "and it just made you realize just how great ABBA are." The Oxford native grabbed ABBA: The Album, which features "Eagle" by the Swedish pop quartet, and explained, "now everyone kind of laughs at ABBA, but we all grew up with ABBA when we were kids. It's what my mum was playing all the time, so it's difficult to not like (them)."

English rock band Ride was formed in Oxford by longtime school friends Andy Bell and Mark Gardener, their college classmate Laurence Colbert, and Steve Queralt, the singles buyer at their local Our Price Ride Weather Diariesrecord shop. Inspired by loud art rock bands like My Bloody Valentine, The House of Love, The Stone Roses, and Sonic Youth, Ride became synonymous with the nascent shoegaze scene, although they tried to avoid any sort of label. The band made their live debut in 1988 at a holiday party hosted by North Oxfordshire College, where Bell, Gardener, and Colbert attended school. After Jim Reid of The Jesus and Mary Chain heard a track from their demo, the band piqued the interest of former JAMC manager Alan McGee, who signed Ride to his Creation Records label after they toured alongside The Soup Dragons in 1989.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Cold War Kids

Posted by Amoebite, June 19, 2017 07:00pm | Post a Comment

Cold War Kids Amoeba Music What's In My Bag?

We were excited to have Nathan Willett and Matt Maust of Cold War Kids at Amoeba Hollywood to show us what they picked up on their most recent visit. "To come into Amoeba was the biggest deal in the world," says lead vocalist/guitarist Willett about the opening of the LA location in 2001. "I think we came opening day; I know I did," adds Maust.

Indie rock five-piece Cold War Kids formed in Fullerton in 2004 while the members were students at Biola University. The band took their name from an experience Matt Maust had while traveling in Budapest, visiting a park with a children's playground and several missing statues from the Cold War era. The band released their debut EP, Mulberry Street in 2005; the release drew its name from a Cold War Kids LA Divine Amoeba Musicrestaurant below multi-instrumentalist/vocalist Jonnie Russell's apartment where the group would regularly meet. In 2006, Cold War Kids signed to Downtown Records and released their first full-length, Robbers & Cowards. They embarked on an extensive North American tour to promote the album, joining the White Stripes on their summer 2007 tour.

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Alles gute zum geburtstag Schaffel - The musical repercussions of Depeche Mode's "Personal Jesus"

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 30, 2015 04:05pm | Post a Comment

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the infamous Depeche Mode Riots, in which half a dozen people were treated for minor injuries. Another Depeche Mode milestone is upon us as on 29 August 1989 the band released their 23rd single, "Personal Jesus" and basically invented the "schaffel" subgenre. 



It wasn't their first single to prominently feature electric guitars -- preceding non-album single "Route 66" (a cover of Bobby Troup's standard "(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66") had made use of them to good effect. However, I was always suspicious when electronic musicians added guitars to their synthpop because so often it seemed like a calculated effort to appeal to the musical conservatives. It was with suspicion that I first approached "Personal Jesus" but after the release of the guitar-less "Enjoy the Silence" I breathed a sigh of relief. 



Truth be told, Iggy Pop was probably the first to recognize that combining electronics with the glitter stomp of T. Rex and Chinnichap was a good idea. "Nightclubbing" was released as a single in 1977 and featured a Glitter Band-inspired riff paired with a drum machine. I'm willing to bet, however, that a fair few of the schaffel crowd didn't hear that song until it resurfaced on the soundtrack of 1996's Trainspotting.

When Depeche Mode's "Personal Jesus," arrived in 1989, twelve years after "Nightclubbing" it seemed to take another 11 years to inspire followers Covenant to resurrect the sound with "Like Tears in the Rain." By then it was apparent that a gimmick, if good enough, can be the basis of an entire movement and "shaffel" was born and And One, SuperpitcherE NomineT. Raumschmiere, ElectronicatWighnomy BrosGoldfrappAssemblage 23, CombichristWumpscut, Addam Bombb, and Zombie Girl all got in on the act. In 2004, Marilyn Manson released a cover that answered the previously unasked question, "What would 'Personal Jesus' sound like if massacred at karaoke by someone with terminal vocal fry?" 




SOME EXAMPLES OF SCHAFFEL


Covenant's "Like Tears in the Rain" (2000)


And One's "Wasted (Naghavi-Mix)" (2000)


E Nomine's "Mitternacht"
 (2001)


Quarks' "I Walk (Superpitcher Schaffel Mix)" (2002)

 
T. Raumschmiere's "Monster Truck Driver"
 (2003)


Electronicat's "21st Century Toy" (2003)

 
Wighnomy Bros & Robag Wruhme's "Bodyrock" (2003)

Goldfrapp's "Train" (2003)

Assemblage 23's "Dirt" (2007)


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A Look Back at the Depeche Mode Riots

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 11, 2015 07:43pm | Post a Comment

Today is the 50th anniversary of the Watts Riots (or Watts Rebellion, depending on your point of view). In that riot, 3,438 Anglenos were arrested, 1,032 were injured, and 34 died. This year (but not today) is also the 25th anniversary of another, less serious uprising, the Depeche Mode Riots, in which five people were treated for injuries.

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Southern California has hosted its share of riots; there was the San Gabriel Mission Riot in 1785, the Chinese Massacre of 1871, the Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, the Cooper Do-nuts Uprising of 1959, the Sunset Strip Curfew Riots of 1966, the Black Cat Riot of 1967, the Huntington Beach Surf Riot of 1986, the Los Angeles Riots of 1992, the San Bernardino Punk Riot of 2006, the Anaheim Riots of 2012, and the another Huntington Beach Surf Riot in 2013. Some (most) were exacerbated by the authorities, and several were fueled by civil rights aspirations and/or racism. Only one that I know of was fueled by hormones, Anglophila, and ARP-2600s.



In most of the USDepeche Mode were known only as that band who sang “People are People.” 1987’s Music for the Masses only reached no. 35 on the pop charts and of its four singles, non troubled the Top 40. In Southern California, however, Depeche Mode and Music for the Masses were massive and on the final performance of that album's tour they played to an audience of 60,000 fans at the Pasadena Rose Bowl -- there biggest concert ever. The event formed the centerpiece of 101, a concert film by cinéma direct pioneer DA Pennebaker.



Depeche Mode’s follow-up, Violator, was eagerly anticipated by fans who waited three years for its release. The electro-glam single “Personal Jesus” provided a tease when released in 1989 and singlehandedly gave birth to the schaffel subgenere. It cracked the Top 40 which meant Casey Kasem and Rick Dees were obligated to play it on their chart shows, which in turn meant even kids in the heartland heard it emanating from the speakers on their school buses. 


Enjoy the Silence” reached no. 8 in the charts, at that point their highest placing yet. The stylish Anton Corbijn-directed music video was duly played on syndicated Saturday morning video shows and suddenly Depeche Mode were familiar to anyone under 30. I remember a troglodyte stand-up having a bit about how wimpy (gasp!) and pale (the horror!) they were… and probably something to about how music made on electronic rather than electric music isn’t “real” (a surprisingly common view among idiots of the day). Just don’t refer to their music as “progressive techno-pop.”




Violator was released on 20 March 1990. I bought a copy on compact disc from a music store in the Columbia Mall. I heard about the Depeche Mode riots was from a syndicated tabloid “news” show — probably either A Current Affair or Hard Copy. I remember the subtext of the report was along the lines of “How is it possible that so many kids are rioting over a band that I, a journalist, have never heard of?”



The the newscasters’ discredit, though, they probably would’ve had the same reaction had the band in question been U2, INXS, or R.E.M., but none of those stadium filling bands of the era were English and in Anglophile California there weren't just Depeche Mode fanatics but Depeche Mode clones like Cause & Effect and Red Flag. The band's sartorial style, too, was suddenly similar to that of the local “rebel” subculture which was the subject of a series of typically exploitive/concerned Chris Blatchford exposés for Fox Undercover.

Depeche Mode were scheduled to do an in-store signing at the Wherehouse on La Cienega in Beverly Grove, to promote the new album and sign autographs. Fans came from other states and in some cases camped out for four days in oder to catch a glimpse of the band. By the 20th, the line was three kilometers long and contained as many as 17,000 hard core fans. 

After 90 minutes, the LAPD shut down the event out of safety concerns. The boys from Basildon escaped out the back entrance, and hundreds of mounted riot police and police helicopters tried to maintain control. The stores windows were smashed and all hell broke loose. Aside from the five injuries, most of the wounds were of merely disappointment -- something the band and KROQ tried to soothe by giving away a free promotional cassette of an interview conducted by Richard Blade b/w a remix of “Something to Do.”

SEE ALSO: California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Watts, The Cooper Do-Nuts Uprising, and No Enclave -- Exploring English Los Angeles




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