Amoeblog

The Moon missions and the children of Major Tom -- the end of the space age and the music that followed

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 20, 2009 03:58pm | Post a Comment
first moon landing

It's the 40th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and looking back at that achievement it's obvious that one of the many repercussions was evinced in the music of the era. In addition to the space rock of bands like Pink Floyd and Hawkwind and sci-fi minded funk acts like Funkadelic, the glam rock scene, which exploded around the same time, is one of the most obvious manifestations. For a couple of years, glam rock was massively popular in several countries and it spawned hordes of mylar-and-make-up-wearing rockers singing about extraterrestrial love and lonely planet boys. On December 7, 1972, the Apollo 17 was the last manned mission to the moon and the space age, shortly after, seems to have drawn quietly to a close. Glam rock seemed to fizzle shortly afterward, but maybe it just went underground, seeking out new frontiers in a different set of clothes.



First, in 1973, David Bowie retired his extraterrestrial Ziggy Stardust and released Aladdin Sane. Although hardly a radical departure, it was famously hyped as "Ziggy goes to America" and represented Bowie's efforts to move in a new direction. Then, in early 1974, glam rock's creator Marc Bolan announced that "Glam rock is dead." His February release, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tomorrow - A Creamed Cage in August, was described by its creator as "cosmic soul." Bowie described his next direction as "plastic soul" shortly afterward. Glam's two most important stars seemed committed to moving on in spirit, if perhaps overstating the change in their music.

Recently Found Art Part 1

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, June 26, 2009 02:30pm | Post a Comment

Starting off with some nice homemade cover art, Bowie never looked finer. I absolutely love the red drawing below; the details are awesome. Dude is drinking f**king Alize! The Ric Ocasek scrawl is priceless, unlike his solo efforts which are priced low. Sorry, couldn't resist that one...


A couple of Beach Boys afters and befores. The Sharpie drawings were over the original shrink wrap; I really dig Mike Love with huge black eyebrows.


How many different GGW Lps are there? I'm not sure, but this is a one of a kind, as is the Grim Reaper pic found inside. Bobby Vinton looks to have had a bit of an accident. The Elsa Lanchester 10" is rare on its own, the drawing must add...oh...a 80% deduction to the value. Unless of course, she drew it, which is a possibilty. The Decline record is too good to be true-- could it have been El Duce himself who defaced poor Darby?


Got A Light?

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, June 13, 2009 12:15pm | Post a Comment

Peter Frampton Breaking All The Rules LP coverMott the Hoople & David Bowie Bootleg coverScrooged soundtrack lp cover
los sinners lp coverenrique guzman lp coverholiday in spain lp cover
the mambo kings lp coverel canaveral los coyotes del rio bravo lp covermerle haggard going where the lonely go lp cover
sam kinison louder than hell lp coverthe nite-liters instrumental directions lp coverstuff lp cover
markus kugelblitz & raketen lp coverravel bolero philadelphia orchestra eugene ormandy lp cover
joan rivers what becomes a semi-legend most promo lp coverdane donohue lp coverjackie gleason present the love hours lp cover
gordon payne lp coverjeff chandler sings to you lp coverrobert gordon too fast to live too young to die lp cover
harvey scales confidential affair lp coverthe mad show lp cover

Continue reading...

Jumpers

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 27, 2009 06:45pm | Post a Comment
redemption 87 lp coverthe fantastic chi-lites lp coverattitude ep cover
baltimora living in the background lp coverdavid bowie never let me down lp covertim scott swear ep back cover
siempre pa'arriba lp coverbest of the cryan' shames lp coverelton john lp cover
freddy kenton ooh la la lp coverleo sayer endless flight lp cover
textones lp coverozone jump on it lp covery&t back cover
rail ep back covermusic explosion little bit o'soul lp cover
sly and the family stone fresh lp covermighty high lp back coverstarship we built this city cover
los grijos lp coverj. geils band back covernewbeats run baby run lp cover

ANDY WARHOL'S OUTSOURCING OF ART + TDK TV AD + DAVID BOWIE

Posted by Billyjam, February 25, 2009 03:57pm | Post a Comment

ANDY WARHOL + BRIGID BERLIN ON WHO ACTUALLY DID WARHOL'S ART

This post is inspired by the upcoming 3rd Annual Amoeba Art Show + Factory Party in conjunction with the East Bay Express next Friday, March 6th (6-11PM), which is bound to be hella fun -- like all Amoeba events and the East Bay Express'  Best of the East Bay event at the Oakland Museum a few months ago which Amoeba was also a part of. And the art show is free too! warholAnyway, above is an excerpt from the interviews in which Andy Warhol (sans glasses) credits Brigid Berlin (also in the clip) for contributing to the creation of many of his paintings, resulting in folks becoming highly skeptical of "his" work and whether or not "his" work should be rightfully credited to him or someone else.

What I love most about this open admission by Warhol is his pure honesty, his unbridled  don't-give-a-fuck attitude as to what people (serious art critics) may think, and the fact that even by not doing all of his own art or by outsourcing it, that he was in effect still creating a new style of art -- one that is so influential that even the "Photo Booth" program in the Mac I am working on comes complete with a Warhol derived "Pop Art" feature. 

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