Amoeblog

Sunken Continent Mental Vacation Needed

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 31, 2019 06:05pm | Post a Comment

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show

"Knowing her fate, Atlantis sent out ships to all corners of the Earth,
On board were the Twelve: The poet, the physician, the farmer, the scientist,
the magician and the other so-called Gods of our legends.
Though Gods they were...
And as the elders of our time choose to remain blind,
Let us rejoice and let us sing and dance and ring in the new...Hail Atlantis!"
~ Donovan, "Atlantis," 1968

Were you too thwacking the side of your head to get the salt water and crummy dialogue out of your brain after seeing the new DC AquaDude movie? Good grief, give me a 1966 Marvel Sub-Mariner cartoon on VHS any day over that overload of computer-graphic garbage...for nothing beats the fear of being trapped in the Quagmire of Doom!

Not to mention, the fear of being killed by a giant man-eating clam, much like the lyrics to "Leah," my favorite Roy Orbison song.



Like many, my first introductions to Atlantis as a kid were from watching In Search of with Leonard Warlords of AtlantisNimoy and Arthur C. Clarke giving his theory on the lost continent while twirling a rainbow parasol and strolling on a beach in Sri Lanka. It was not till I was in my mid-20's that I discovered such breathtakingly "beautiful" films as Beyond Atlantis (1973), The Giant of Metropolis (1961), Warlords of Atlantis (1978), and the George Pal classic Atlantis, the Lost Continent (1961) with the menacing Giant Death-Ray Crystal! Mind you, what takes my breath away may just give you bad breath...but it's worth it, much like chewing on Riley's delicious Jalapeno beef jerky.

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Having A Movie Moment with Jon Longhi: The Genius of Dan Curtis

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 15, 2019 07:00pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Welcome to this month’s Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi, where I review recent Blu-ray Trilogy of Terrorreleases. This month I review three movies created by the brilliant Dan Curtis.

Dan Curtis was one of the most successful director/producers in the history of television. History will always remember him as the creator of the long running TV show Dark Shadows but that was just one of many major achievements. He also produced and/or directed some of the biggest movies in the history of television. Three of these films just got deluxe Blu-ray releases. One of his two biggest films was Trilogy Of Terror, (Kino Lorber Studio Classics). This is a fun little horror flick but no one could have predicted that it would be one of the most watched TV movies of all time. It held the record until Roots was televised later that decade. The movie tells three horror stories that are connected by the main star of the film, the magnificent Karen Black. She pretty much makes this movie. She is the main character in all three vignettes and chews up the scenery so mightily that everyone else in the picture is little more than a bit player. In the first segment she plays a mousy professor exploited by a blackmailer, in the second she's a pair of polar opposite sisters, but it's her role in the third segment, "Amelia," that history will remember her for. "Amelia" is one of the best little horror movies ever made and it scared the viewing public to a degree that few could understand in this jaded day and age. Karen Black's portrayal of the vulnerable, psychologically fragile Amelia makes the horror she suffers even more visceral. The story is fairly simple and all takes place in one tiny apartment. Amelia finds a Zuni fetish doll in a second hand store and buys it as a gift for her anthropologist boyfriend. The doll comes with a curse and, when she gets back to her apartment, Amelia unwittingly brings it to life. What ensues is one of the scariest things I've ever seen on television. This segment really holds up even after all these years. It's tense, harrowing, and genuinely scary. Being attacked by a doll could easily have been laughable, but in Curtis's skilled hands the story becomes utterly terrifying. This was one of the most memorable movies of the seventies and it left an indelible mark on everyone who saw it.

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Something Weird This Way Comes

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 30, 2018 04:45pm | Post a Comment

Something Weird's Greatest HitsBy Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show

 "Don't tell me you believe those ridiculous stories about evil spirits and witch doctors that turn themselves into giant alligators and all that rubbish"

"I'm sorry but I'm afraid I do."

~ from Death Curse of Tartu, 1966

Do you remember your body being possessed by a "Dancing Demon" in your living room after the first time you heard "Pass the Hatchet" by Roger and the Gypsies on a Las Vegas Grind LP? This is the same feeling my body parts got when I first heard Syd Dale's "The Hell Raisers" on Something Weird's Greatest Hits double LP.



Death Curse of TartuSince the early 1990's, Something Weird has been re-releasing such delightful bottom-shelf flicks as Blood Feast, Night of the Bloody Apes, Nude on the Moon, and one of my personal favorites, Death Curse of Tartu, in which some unthoughtful students have a dance party on the burial site of an ancient Indian medicine man who gets steaming mad and returns from the beyond for revenge!

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Samson the Supreme & Delilah the Delightful

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 30, 2018 06:31pm | Post a Comment

Delilah

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show

"Delilah got in action, Delilah did her kootch
She gave him satisfaction and he fell 'neath her spell,
With the aid of love and hootch"
~ "Sam and Delilah" (1931) by Duke Ellington

There have been many songs and movies about the Nazarite stud-muffin and that saucy, seductive gal from Sorek. Popular groups whose music makes my ears cringe like...uggg...Queen, Grateful Dead, and The Cranberries have all sung about the famous story of romance and betrayal. Me, I'd rather put a quarter in the jukebox for Nat King Cole's "Song of Delilah" or Tom Jones' 1967 hit, "Delilah" (which has stabbing murder lyrics like a Johnny Cash song).



On the tropical isle of Jamaica, Eric "Monty" Morris and other early ska musicians recorded songs in the '60s about the Biblical dysfunctional duo too.

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Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi: The Horrors! The Horrors!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 29, 2018 06:07pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

Welcome to this month’s Having A Movie Moment With Jon Longhi, where I review recent Blu-ray releases. Both of these Blu-rays came out in the past three months. This month, I review two very different movies that just happen to have the word Horror in their titles.

Horrors of Malformed Men, Arrow Video:
This movie is like going to a Cirque Du Soleil show where all the performers on stage accidentally ate theHorrors of Malformed Men brown acid. I own a huge collection of cult films and along with the films of John Waters, Salvador Dali's Un Chien Andalou, Fellini's Satyricon, and Alejandro Jodorowsky's The Holy Mountain, and this movie pretty much rules the roost of the "HOLY SHIT, WHAT THE FUCK AM I WATCHING?" segment of my collection. The second half of this movie is like a sustained psychedelic assault on the senses. Director Teruo Ishii really pulled out all the stops to make this a one-of-a-kind experience. The movie is an adaptation of the writings of Edogawa Rampo and combines elements of his novels Strange Tale of Panorama Island and The Demon of The Lonely Isle with some of his short stories. The end result is a literal bombardment of strange surreal perversions. There's incest, bestiality, cannibalism, and a number of sexual fetishes that seem unique to Japan. There's a scene where a man sewn into a couch molests women who unsuspectingly sit on it.

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