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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Ethan Hawke

Posted by Amoebite, December 4, 2018 03:20pm | Post a Comment

Ethan Hawke - What's In My Bag?

We had the pleasure of sitting down with actor, writer, and director Ethan Hawke at Amoeba Hollywood recently to discuss some of the albums and movies that had a particular place in his heart, including the outlaw country documentary Heartworn Highways. "I'm really grateful for this opportunity you've given me to talk about this movie," he told us. "It slices like a razor blade through your body and you open up, in a good way. There's something about it that really moves me." Hawke had much to say about all of his picks, both heartfelt and entertaining, making for a genuine and educational What's In My Bag? episode.

Blaze movie

Ethan Hawke has been nominated for four Oscars and a Tony. In 1989, Hawke had his breakthrough performance in the role of Todd Anderson in Dead Poets Society. His star continued to rise with the release of slacker comedy Reality Bites (1994), Before Sunrise (1995), Gattaca (1997), and Great Expectations (1998). Hawke accrued critical accolades thanks to his work in Waking Life (2001) and Training Day (2001). Along with co-writers Julie Delpy and Richard Linklater, Hawke received his first Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for his work on Before Sunset (2004), the sequel to Before Sunrise. The third film in The Before Trilogy, Before Midnight (2013), garnered the trio another Best Adapted Screenplay nomination. Another collaboration with Linklater, 2014's Boyhood, was nominated for five Golden Globes (winning three), five BAFTA awards (winning one), and six Academy Awards (winning one). 

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Joe Goldmark's "Blue Steel" Out Now

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 6, 2018 07:24pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba SF's own steel guitar master, Joe Goldmark, has just released his most exciting album to dateJoe Goldmark, Blue Steel with Blue Steel. Mixing Americana, blues, and roots music, Blue Steel showcases a number of original songs, plus a diverse mix of cover tunes ranging from Jimmy McCracklin, Graham Parker, B.B. King, and Jeff Lynne, to Lefty Frizzell, Rufus Thomas, and Dallas Frazier. Best known for his honky-tonk country and Americana sounds, Goldmark has combined an extra component this time with the addition of blues/roots songs like “All Night Worker,” “The Wobble,” and “Beautician Blues.”

“My album cover is loosely based on an old Starday Records album by Arthur ‘Guitar Boogie’ Smith called Blue Guitar,” Goldmark says. “The artwork is blue, but the title Blue Steel actually reflects the R&B feel of the music on the album. Although the pedal steel guitar is considered a ‘country’ instrument by many, I’ve always placed it in other musical genres with excellent results. Blue Steel is colored by a soulful approach to all the tunes, especially on the handful of blues numbers.”

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Country Legend Marty Stuart

Posted by Amoebite, November 22, 2017 03:53pm | Post a Comment

Marty Stuart What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

When country music legend Marty Stuart went record shopping at Amoeba Hollywood he couldn't help but run into himself. Whether he found records that he had played on, or records by people he had played with, Stuart found his visit to be a trip down memory lane. Playing professionally from a very early age, he had many an anecdote about the personal significance of each record chosen. Take, for example, The Fabulous Johnny Cash and Flatt and Scruggs' Greatest Hits, the first two records Stuart ever owned. "The crazy part about it," he says, "was the only two jobs that I ever had in my life was with Lester Flatt and Johnny Cash." Now that's something most of us can't claim.

Marty Stuart blends traditional country, rockabilly, and honky tonk sounds to create his own unique style. After teaching himself to play the guitar and mandolin at a young age, he began performing with the bluegrass group The Sullivan Family when he was just twelve-years-old. When he was thirteen, he signed on to perform with Lester Flatt, thanks to a meeting with Flatt's bandmate Roland White. Stuart went on to perform with Vassar Clements, Doc Watson, and Johnny Cash, whose backing band he joined in 1980. He left the band in 1985 to pursue a solo career, eventually signing with Columbia Records and releasing a self-titled debut that garnered him a Top 20 country single via the track "Arlene."

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Longtime Grand Ole Opry Member "Little" Jimmy Dickens Has Died

Posted by Billyjam, January 3, 2015 03:45pm | Post a Comment

According to several published reports today, country singing legend and longtime regular at the Grand Ole Opry "Little" Jimmy Dickens has died. With the cause listed as cardiac arrest (following being hospitalized from suffering a stroke a week ago), Dickens died yesterday in a Nashville-area hospital at age 94. According to a press release issued by the Grand Ole Opry, he was the last living member of the Grand Ole Opry who was actually older than the radio show itself. In his long lifetime, "Little" Jimmy Dickens became famous for his novelty hit records beginning with 1949's "Take An Old Cold Tater (And Wait)," "I'm Little but I'm Loud," "Sleeping At The Foot of the Bed," and "May the Bird of Paradise Fly Up Your Nose" - the latter of which (a 1965 number one hit single) was reportedly inspired by Johnny Carson's Tonight Show sketch "Carnac the Magnificent." See the video interview below in which he talks about the mixed blessing of becoming known primarily for his novelty songs, as well as other topics such as what he wanted to be remembered for in life.

"Little" Jimmy Dickens, who earned his name for his diminutive stature (he stood 4' 11"), was a man with a self-deprecating sense of humor and would routinely get laughs by drawing attention to his own height with such witty catchphrases as calling himself "Willie Nelson after taxes."  Dickens first joined the Opry cast in 1948 and would stay with them right up the end making his final appearance on the Opry stage just two weeks ago on December 20th, 2014 - the day after his 94th birthday. Dickens, who was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1983, leaves behind a back catalog of music spanning several decades as many record labels and including a few dozen singles and twelve albums in addition to a string of various artist compilations he appeared on. Look for Dickens' material at Amoeba online as well as in the Amoeba stores.

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Tears in your beers -- Country tunes for Tax Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 15, 2014 09:35am | Post a Comment
Krazy Kat and crew

Income taxes -- they're no fun -- especially when you're poor. 

There are few escapes from them, too. Most of the few countries which don't have them are located in Arabia, where massive corporate taxes on even more massive oil revenue make them unnecessary. In the US, on the other hand, corporate income taxes only account for about 9% of federal government receipts (we may have the highest nominal corporate tax rate in the world but the effective corporate tax rate is much lower) whereas individual income taxes account for about 41%. That might, at first glance, seem high but our individual income taxes are actually low compared to those of most countries. In the developed world, only Chileans, Mexicans, and Turks contribute less to their countries' GDPs... or something (my mind glazed over for a second). 



Enough about percentages and Arabia -- what if you want to stay in America but still avoid taxes. You could always go Unabomber or embark upon a black market career... as Big Daddy Kane told us, "pushers don't pay taxes." But Jesus wouldn't approve of either of those options. The Messiah made his opinions on taxes known in the Gospel of Matthew, and even got a little testy:

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