Amoeblog

OOFJ Bring Their Electro-Pop Noir to Amoeba July 23

Posted by Billy Gil, July 10, 2015 09:15am | Post a Comment

Listening to OOFJ feels like watching a film noir from the future. Melodramatic strings, bubbling electronic beats and Katherine Mills-Rymer’s desperately breathy vocals come together for a sound that wouldn’t feel out of place in a new David Lynch or Roman Polanski film. That’s not accidental—while you could draw comparisons to bands like Portishead and Goldfrapp, the band’s composer, Jenno Bjornkjaer, has worked on film scores like Lars Von Trier’s Melancholia, during which he met his musical and romantic partner in Mills-Rymer. The debut album from OOFJ (which stands for “orchestra of Jenno”) pulls heavily from filmic inspiration but manages to put that into four-minute electro-pop songs that are heady and addictively catchy in equal doses.

I took a minute to speak with the duo before their performances at Amoeba Hollywood July 23 at 6 p.m. and their slot playing Amoeba Music’s curated Red Bull Sound Select show July 30 at the Echoplex with Baths and Wrestlers (click here to RSVP).

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Tim & Eric Present: To Live and Deejay LA

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 27, 2015 10:54am | Post a Comment


Tim "Modern Brit" Shimbles
(Amoeba employee and frequent traveling companion on California Fool's Gold) and yours truly are going to DJ a set of "locals only" music called To Live and Deejay LA on 12 May at the Melody Lounge in Chinatown. (Click here to join the Facebook event page). 



Los Angeles is a big place... bigger than the island of Jamaica in fact. It's home to an estimated 10,116,705 people, making it by far the most populous county in the USA (and home to more people than 43 entire states). The Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim census area is also the mostly densely-populated region in the country. I've had a long and hard think, aided by suggestions, trying to come up with a great list of Angeleno musical acts (and no, I didn't forget Red Hot Chili Peppers). Just for the occasion* I painted a huge map of every community in the county and every neighborhood in Los Angeles which has helped stoke the memory. 


Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's Map of Los Angeles Communities and Neighborhoods



Attendees can expect to hear some, if not all (it's taking place from 10pm until 1:45am) of the following Angeleno acts: Abstract Rude, Aceyalone, Allah-Las, The Amplifiers, The And ActionsThe Angry Samoans, The AntarcticansArabian Prince, Armored Saint, Art Pepper, AshesThe Association, Autolux, The BallroomThe Bangles, The Beach Boys, Beachwood SparksThe Beat, The BeesThe Belairs, Best Coast, Bill Perkins, Black Flag, The Blasters, The Blendells, Blood on the Saddle, Bloods & Crips, Bob MarkleyBoo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E.The Bourbon Saints, Boyce & HartBread

Buddy Collette, Buffalo Springfield, The Byrds, The Cadets, Cambalache, Canned Heat, Cannibal & the Headhunters, Captain Beefheart, The CarpentersChico Hamilton, The Chymes,  Circle Jerks, The Common ColdCongo Norvell, Cruzados, Darlene LoveDavid Crosby, Dead Angle, Death Valley Girls, Deepest Blue (The Doves), Dengue Fever, Dennis Wilson, Destruct, The Devil Bats, The Dickies, The DilsDino, Desi & BillyDJ Quik, DokkenThe Doors, Dramarama, The Dream Syndicate,

Dum Dum Girls
, E. Coli, Eazy-E, Eddie & The Showmen, The Egyptian Lover, El Chicano, The Electric Prunes, Emily's Sassy Lime, Emitt RhodesThe EmperorsEric DolphyThe Everpresent Fullness
The Exiles, Faster Pussycat, Father Yod, Fatlip, Fear, The 5th Dimension, fIREHOSE, Fishbone, The Flesh Eaters, 45 Grave, Freestyle Fellowship, The Friends of DistinctionThe Full Treatment, Funkdoobiest, FurtherThe Garden Club

Gary Lewis & the PlayboysThe Generators, The Geraldine Fibbers, Germs, Giant Drag, The Go-Go's, The Grass RootsGreat White, The Groop, The Grown-Ups, The Gun Club, Guns N' Roses, Gwenmars, Hearts and FlowersHeidecker & Wood, Herb AlpertHexHollywood Rose, The Hondells, Ice Cube, The Jaguars, Jan & Dean, Jane's Addiction, Jay Rock, Jenni Rivera, Jesse Lee KincaidJoe Byrd & the Field Hippies, Johnny Horton, Joint Effort, Just Too MuchKaleidoscope, Kendrick Lamar,

Kim FowleyKing Tee, The Knack (1960s), The Knack (1970s), The Knights of DayL.A. Dream Team, L.A. Guns, The LA UntouchablesThe Lamp of Childhood, Las Cafeteras, The Last, Lavender Diamond, The Lazy Cowgirls, The Leaves, Lee Harvey (Lee Jones), LemonaLena Park, Lifter, Lone Justice, The Long Ryders, Longstocking, Los AbandonedLos Lobos, Love, Lowell George & The FactoryThe Manson Family, Marvin & Johnny, Mary Jane Girls, Mary's Danish, MellowHype,

The Merry-Go-Round, Midnight Movies, Mike G, The Millennium, Minutemen, The MixersThe Monkees, The MoonMötley CrüeThe Motorcycle AbelineMoving UnitsThe Music MachineMyka 9, N.W.A., Nate DoggThe Nerves, Nino Tempo & April StevensThe Nitty Gritty Dirt BandNo Solution, October County, The OdysseyOingo Boingo, Opal, Opus 1, The Others, The Palace GuardThe Pandoras, The Partridge FamilyPasternak Progress, Patsy, The Peanut Butter Conspiracy

The Penguins, The Penny ArkadePenny Dreadfuls, The Pharcyde, PidgeonPleasure featuring Billy Elder, The Plimsouls, Poco, Poison, Possum DixonThe Preachers, The Premiers, Pretty Boy Floyd, Puro Instinct, The Quick, Quiet Riot, Radio Vago, Rain ParadeRandy Newman Ratt, Redd Kross, René & Angela, Rising SonsRitchie Valens, Rodney-O & DJ Joe Cooley, Roger Nichols TrioThe Romancers (The Smoke Rings), The Rose Garden,  Rose RoyceThe Runaways, The Safaris,

Sagittarius, 2nd II None, The Seeds, ShakeThe Sharp Ease, Silver Needle, SISU, Snap-Her, Snoop Dogg, Sonny & CherThe Sounds of Sunshine, Sparks, Spirit, The Standells, The Stone Poneys, Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Sugarplastic, Suicidal Tendencies, The Sunshine Company, The Surfaris, Sweater GirlsThe Sylvers, Sylvester, T.S.O.L., The Tartans, The Teddy BearsTex & the Horseheads, Thee MidnitersThorinshieldThe Three O'Clock, Things To ComeTierraTom Russell,

Total ChaosThe Turtles, Ty Karim, The TydeTyler, the Creator, Union 13, The United States of America, The UVs, Van Halen, Van Stone, Very Be Careful, W.A.S.P.The W.C. Fields Memorial Electric String Band (aka ESB aka Fields)The Walker Brothers, Wall of Voodoo, 王力宏, War, The Warlocks, Warren GThe Watts Prophets, Wax, The Weirdos, The West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, World Class Wreckin' Cru, The Yellow BalloonThe Yellow PaygesX, ZipcodeZolar X, Zoot Sims 

...and more if you've got suggestions*

*****

Follow me at ericbrightwell.com


*****

*not really
**Sorry, no Eagles

Brightwell vs Club Underground vs Sunday

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 7, 2011 12:25pm | Post a Comment
SUNDAY SUNDAY



If you find yourself free this Sunday, DJs Larry G (Supercrass) and Timothy L (Modernbrit) of Club Underground (and Amoeba, in the latter's case) are going to DJ a set of post-punk, indie and more at Brightwell between the hours of 3:00 and 7:00.

CLUB UNDERGROUND


Club Underground bills itself as "LA's Premiere indie/britpop/new wave/electropop/twee/60s/soul party since 2001. It occurs most Fridays at the Grand Star Jazz Club in Chinatown.

BRIGHTWELL



Brightwell is a men's shop which bills itself as "LA's premiere men's shop specializing in luxury and craft objects for the discerning, grown-ass man since 2011." The High Street shop is the only one of its kind in Southern California and is located on the corner of West Silver Lake and Rowena in Silver Lake's fashionable Ivanhoe district.

AND YOU

So whether you're an avant-garde Dandy or a nostalgic Anglophile, you're liable to find something to your liking (even if it just turns out to be free wine, cheese and crakcers). Stop by, say "hullo" and pick up something for the men in your life.

*****

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California Fool's Gold -- A Downtown Los Angeles Primer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 15, 2011 11:00am | Post a Comment
BEAT CITY DOWNTOWN 


As regular (and probably irregular) readers of Eric's Blog know, I'm a bit of a Southern California wonk and a big part of my focus is writing about the culture, character and history of the many diverse communities of Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Although so far there have been around 800 votes from readers I thought it would be fun (and hopefully entertaining) to focus on the regions and provide a brief summary of the districts within with the hope of encouraging informed voting. First I'd like to focus on the center of the southland, Downtown Los Angeles.


DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES

Before I moved to Los Angeles, a Chicagoan told me that LA had no downtown. I could see the cluster of buildings although it wasn't that much different from the many others that rise above the sprawl. Having visited it in the late '90s I disagreed with my acquaintance but could see her point. During the day the western portion was a commotion of be-suited bankers and accountants. The middle was absolutely bustling with Latino businesses and I found a great source for white denim and pupusas. The eastern portion was covered with tents and I saw people performing acts in exchange for crack that should only be done in private... and not for crack. When the sun set, metal doors and gates closed and it was desolate. I was occasionally threatened although I never was robbed or assaulted and to me it seemed that most visitors were from safe middle or upper class backgrounds who needed a bit of danger and prescribed, structured, punk rock rebellion to feel alive.  
 


Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Downtown Los Angeles 
 

A decade later it's greatly changed, with a large influx of residents and businesses returning to the city's core. Downtown Los Angeles is home to 21 (or 22) distinct districts and now home to around 64,000 Angelenos. It's a highly diverse region with a 44% Asian (mainly Chinese, Korean and Japanese with large numbers of Cambodian, Vietnamese and Thai) plurality with the remainder breaking down as 31% Latino (mostly Mexican), 13% black and 10% white (based on 2008 estimates by the L.A. Department of City Planning).
 
 
 
 

None of this is meant to suggest that all is now well and functioning at its peak potential. Downtown is still the epicenter of homelessness, has a lack of sufficient green space (why aren't green roofs more popular?) and I probably wouldn't suggest raising children there just yet. It is, however, coming up, with LA Live bringing entertainment, abandoned buildings being repurposed as beautiful lofts and the imminent return of trolleys all drawing visitors and new residents. Here's a short history.
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El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles was founded by the Spanish in 1781 in a small neighborhood colloquially known as "El Pueblo," between Chinatown and the Civic Center. In the 19th Century the area around it evolved into Sonoratown and later Little Italy, Dogtown and (old) Chinatown

In 1894, architect John Parkinson moved to Los Angeles and opened an architecture office on Sprint Street between 2nd and 3rd Streets. In 1896 he began designing many of the buildings in what's now known as the Historic Core. In 1904 he designed the city's first skyscraper, the Braly Block. In 1905 his new firm, Parkinson and Bergstrom, became the dominant architectural firm in the city. In 1920 he was joined by his son, Donald B. Parkinson and Parkinson & Parkinson designed many of the structures of the era. Numerous banking institutions moved into the new digs around Spring which came to be known as the "Wall Street of the West." At the same time, many grand hotels also sprang up, as did the entertainment districts along Main and then Broadway. Just a little east, nearer the LA River, several railroads encouraged the development of Downtown's industrial core.

By 1920, Los Angeles's extensive rail lines encouraged early suburban flight, connecting at the time four counties with over 1,100 miles of track. By 1925 Los Angeles had the highest rate of car ownership, further encouraging outward sprawl from the old Victorian Downtown suburbs like Angeleno Heights, Boyle Heights, Bunker HillCrown Hill, Lincoln Heights, and Victor Heights. Although marginalized by the WASP establishment, Jewish Angelenos owned and operated many department stores and businesses in the Jewelry District. When Hollywood, Midtown and the Westside opened their doors to their dollars, many of them took their business, culture and clout with them and Downtown went into a steep decline. 

Efforts were made by the downtown establishment to bring life back to the region. In 1930 Olvera Street in El Pueblo was redeveloped as a sort of Mexican theme park. A similarly touristy Chinatown opened in 1938. Where Chinatown had been, Union Station opened in 1939. Many of the older, increasingly non-white neighborhoods like Dogtown and Bunker Hill were razed in the name of slum clearance and the latter was redeveloped with skyscrapers to entice financial institutions to return (height restrictions were lifted in 1957). Partially successful, the "New Downtown" became home to a new Bunker Hill and Financial District. Meanwhile in the rest of downtown, the region evolved more organically. Broadway became a bustling Latino shopping and theater district. The gay scene found a degree of sanctuary around main and east of Skid Row, artists squatted in then-empty warehouses in what came to be known as The Artists' District.

In the 1960s, several high culture institutions were added to downtown. The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion was completed in 1964. The Ahmanson Theatre and Mark Taper Forum both opened in 1967. MOCA's new home on Grand was built in 1986. The helped make Grand Avenue a somewhere that visitors would head after work. The Los Angeles Mall and Triforium, installed nearby in 1975, were less successful in attracting tourists. 

It wasn't really until 1999, when the Los Angeles City Council passed an adaptive reuse ordinance which allowed for empty commercial and office buildings to be repurposed as luxury lofts and condo complexes, that Downtown really began to feel truly alive again. Staples Center opened the same year. Construction of the Walt Disney Concert Hall also began in 1999. The first lofts in the Old Bank District opened in 2000 and were followed by many more. The first phase of LA Live opened in 2005. Yuppie gentrifiers poured in and although many cranky old haters still characterize downtown as a no man's land full of pimps and crackheads, the reality today is -- for better or for worse -- almost completely unlike their dated characterizations suggest. 
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Now for the neighborhoods:

ARTS DISTRICT


The Downtown Los Angeles Arts District was previously just another corner of the large, old Warehouse District. After much of the industry left the area, in the 1970s it began to attract artists and became known as the Artists District. Venues like the now-gone Al's Bar and parties held in abandoned buildings coexisted with drug abuse, homelessness and prostitution. Around the turn of the 21st century, real estate developers began to convert many of the old buildings to attractive (and expensive) residences that commodified a slightly gritty, artist lifestyle whilst pricing out many of the area's resident artists. To read more about The Arts District, click here.


BROADWAY THEATER DISTRICT


The Broadway Theater and Commercial District is located in downtown's Historic Core region. Within six blocks there are twelve former nickelodeons, vaudeville theaters and picture palaces, making it the first and largest historic theater district listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Today most of old theaters operate as churches, swap meets and flea markets, although several of the theaters participate in special movie programs and are open to the public as part of LA Conservancy's walking tours.


BUNKER HILL


Bunker Hill is a small hill that was originally covered with lavish Victorian homes in the 19th century. After most of the neighborhood's wealthy moved further from LA's center, the homes were subdivided and rented by large numbers of Native Americans, Filipinos and other disenfranchised Angelenos. In the 1940s the hillside slum was a frequent setting for many film noirs. In 1955, the neighborhood was demolished and replaced with skyscrapers. Today it's an important center of LA's fine arts scene, home to the Ahmanson Theatre, the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, LA Opera, Los Angeles Philharmonic, MOCA, Performing Arts Center of Los Angeles County, Walt Disney Concert Hall and Redcat.


CHINATOWN


Modern Day Chinatown is located at the former site of LA's Little Italy. The first Chinatown was demolished to allow for the construction of Union Station and the new one opened in 1938. Although most of LA's Chinese-Americans now live in the sprawling San Gabriel Valley, Chinatown is still the cultural heart of the Chinese-American community where several Chinese festivals take place throughout the year. It's also notable for the large number of art galleries. To read more about Chinatown, click here.


CIVIC CENTER


The fancifully named Civic Center is LA's administrative core and beaurcratic core; a complex of city, state, and federal government offices, buildings, and courthouses. Civic Center has the distinction of containing the largest concentration of government employees in the United States outside of Washington, DC. Nestled amongst the large buildings are a number of public art pieces and… I guess you'd call them office gardens or something.


CIVIC SUPPORT


Civic Support is a district north of the Arts District… It's kind of the Roger Clinton to Civic Center's Bill, the Lore to the latter's Data, the Evan to yours truly. Although it's home to beautiful Union Station (and lots of train tracks), it's also where visitors can find the less glamorous Twin Towers Correctional Facility, Housing Authority of the City of LA, the LA Recycling Center, the LA County Public Defender, the Los Angeles County Jail and the art gallery, Jail Gallery. Oh yeah, there are lots of bail bonds places for some reason.



DOWNTOWN AUTO DISTRICT


source: Daily News


The Downtown Auto District was officially designated in 2010. It refers to a stretch of Figueroa that's home to a whopping five car dealerships. This wasn't the result of a grassroots effort or organic development. Rather, the fact that auto sales are the city's top sales tax revenue generator ( $3.3 billion in revenue in 2009 -- netting $271 million for public coffers) convinced Mayor Villaraigosa and First Deputy Mayor Austin Beutner to play booster for big car companies.



DOWNTOWN INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT



The Downtown Industrial District is, along with Skid Row, part of what the city officially refers to a Central City East. Bordering Skid Row, Little Tokyo, The Arts District, The Wholesale District, The Produce District and The Fashion District, its character is predictably a hybrid of wholesale, lofts, homeless and Japanese-owned businesses.


FASHION DISTRICT


The design, distribution and warehouse center of the clothing, accessories and fabric industries used to be known variously as the Textile District, the Fabric District and the Garment District. In a bit of clever re-branding it became known as The Fashion District. While counterfeit goods, bootleg DVDs and the illegal trade of animals that happen around Santee Alley seemingly have little to do with fashion, events like Unique LA at the LA Fashion Market reflect the other end of the spectrum. Still, it's not exactly Milan or Paris.


FINANCIAL DISTRICT


The Financial District is a gleaming neighborhood to the south of Bunker Hill that's dominated by upscale corporate office skyscrapers and grand hotels. It's also home to the Los Angeles Central Library. The 73 story US Bank Tower is the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.


FLOWER DISTRICT


The Flower District is the country's largest wholesale flower district; a six block area consisting of nearly 200 wholesale flower dealers. In 1910, 54 Issei organized a flower market that was incorporated in 1912. It usually opens around two in the morning with flowers arriving from around the world and is a site of hectic activity until the later hours of the morning, usually winding down around 10:00 am.


GALLERY ROW


Gallery Row is a district in the historic core that began with the existence of three art galleries in the area: Inshallah Gallery, bank and 727 Gallery. Artists Nic Cha Kim and Kjell Hagen as well as members of the Arts, Aesthetics, and Culture Committee of the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council (DLANC) lobbied for the official establishment of Gallery Row, which was designated as such in 2003 by City Council. Today there are many more art spaces in the area and frequent Downtown Art Walks attract art and wine enthusiasts.


HISTORIC CORE


The Historic Core was the original center of downtown LA. After World War II, the center shifted west. Within the Historic Core's borders are the more specific neighborhoods of The Old Bank District, Gallery Row, Broadway Theater District and the Jewelry District. In the 1950s it was a center of Latino business and entertainment. Since 2000, it's undergone significant redevelopment, reuse, revitalization and restoration although there are still millions of square feet of unused property in the upper floors of many buildings.


JEWELRY DISTRICT


The Jewelry District is a neighborhood of downtown that, according to the Los Angeles Convention Center and Visitor's Bureau, is the largest jewelry district in the US. Nearly 5,000 businesses report a combined annual sales of almost $3 billion. In the middle of the bling is the hokey and charming St. Vincent Court, an almost hidden block of Middle Eastern and Persian shops and patrons in a Disney-like simulacrum of an old European street.


LITTLE TOKYO


Little Tokyo is one of only three official Japantowns in the US (all in California and with several unofficial ones in SoCal). Beginning around the turn of the 20th century, it was a large neighborhood and home to thousands of Japanese-Americans. During World War II, the residents were relocated to concentration camps and the vacated area became home to many black Angelenos and was known as Bronzeville. After the internment of Japanese-Americans ended, they returned in much reduced numbers to Little Tokyo. Even though most Japanese-Americans moved elsewhere, its status as the cultural heart of Japanese Los Angeles was restored and in 1995 it was declared a National Historic Landmark District. In more recent years, many of the businesses and residences have become increasingly Korean-American although they've, for the most part, preserved and even restored much of the neighborhood's Japanese charm and character. To read more about Little Tokyo, click here.


NORTH INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT


North Industrial District is also known as Naud Junction and Mission Junction after two railroad intersections in the area. It's also known as Dogtown for its proximity to LA's first dog pound. The Chinatown-adjacent North Industrial District is a district of old, mostly Chinese-owned warehouses. What few residents there are mostly reside in the William Mead Housing Projects. With just one elementary school, Ann Street, it's one of the most obscure corners of downtown. To read more about Dogtown, click here.


OLD BANK DISTRICT


The Old Bank District is an Historic Core neighborhood of early 20th century commercial buildings, most of which have been or are in the process of being converted to residential lofts. The bottom floors often boast fashionable eateries and boutiques. The 1999 passage of the city's adaptive reuse ordinance was followed by the 2000 opening of the first repurposed lofts, which sent ripples throughout downtown and spurred much of the area's revival.



PINATA DISTRICT


source: The Chocolate of Meats 



The Piñata District is an informally recognized area centered around the intersection of Olympic Boulevard and Central Avenue that is known for the preponderance of candy-filled papier-mâché containers. It's neighbored by the Electronics, Fashion and Produce Districts.



PRODUCE DISTRICT


The Produce District centers around the massive 482,258 sq. ft. 7th Street Produce Market. One of the largest produce markets in the US, numerous vendors and markets within provide most of the fruits and vegetables for Southern California's restaurants and stores.


EL PUEBLO


El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument, centered on Olvera Street, is the oldest part of Downtown and is often referred to as "La Placita Olvera." There are 27 historic buildings including the Avila Adobe, the Pelanconi House and the Sepulveda House. In 1930, the area was opened as a tourist-targeting Mexican marketplace, much in the manner that nearby Chinatown was eight years later. It's the setting for many Mexican and Mexican-American holiday celebrations and observances.


SEAFOOD DISTRICT


This small but smelly Seafood District is home to several Asian fish markets, canneries and commercial fishing warehouses near Little Tokyo. When the wind is right, the fishy smell carries to the expensive lofts of the Arts District.


SKID ROW


The area contains one of the largest stable populations of homeless persons in the US, estimated to be around 7,000 to 8,000. It's long been a nexus of poverty and, despite the squalor, is full of small, beautiful residential hotels built around the turn of the 20th century that contrast with the numerous tents and cardboard boxes on the sidewalk. There are also many missions and other services targeted toward the homeless population. To read more about Skid Row, click here.


(NEW) SOUTH PARK


Old South Park is a district in South LA centered near the intersection of 51st Street and Avalon Boulevard. However, since 2003 the area around Los Angeles Convention Center, the Staples Center, L.A. LiveFashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM) and the Bob Hope Patriotic Hall has for some reason co-opted the South Park name. The city is also mulling over dropping an American football stadium into the mix in an area already choked by some of the city's worst traffic in a bid to draw more tourists and money to downtown.


TOY DISTRICT


The Toy District emerged in the 1970s, thanks to the four Woo brothers. Shu Woo (who started ABC Toys), Charlie Woo, (who started Mega Toys Inc) and their two brothers established the neighborhood's character when they began importing cheap novelties and electronics, mostly from China. In the decades that have followed, more toy stores have joined them but the neighborhood's not exactly a whimsical world overseen by an improbably named and dressed eccentric.


WHOLESALE DISTRICT

The Wholesale District is a group of warehouses (and strip clubs) located in the southeast part of Downtown Los Angeles. Most of the warehouses within it are industrial in nature and serve the greater Los Angeles area. Few people live in this neighborhood now although it historically had a large black population. It stretches south to the industrial city of Vernon. Recently, the expansion of the Arts District from the north had encroached on its old borders. [I forgot to take a picture. :( ]
 
To vote for downtown or other Los Angeles neighborhoods to be the subject of blog entries, vote here. To vote for Los Angeles County communities, vote here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here

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California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Chinatown

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 6, 2010 06:00pm | Post a Comment
FORGET ABOUT IT, JAKE


Rooftops of Chinatown



Cathay Manor (where I've wanted to party since moving to Los Angeles
A quiet street in Chinatown


Chinatown (洛杉磯唐人街) is Los Angeles neighborhood located just north of downtown. To vote for other neighborhoods, click here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here. To vote for Los Angeles County communities, click here.



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