Amoeblog

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Wolf Parade

Posted by Amoebite, July 9, 2018 05:37pm | Post a Comment

Wolf Parade - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Dan Boeckner and Arlen Thompson of Wolf Parade were at Amoeba Hollywood recently schooling us on some of the records that influenced them in their formative years, new records they've been getting into, and Canadian heroes that have been overlooked by the "arbitrators of cultural taste" in their own country. Take, for example, the industrial group Skinny Puppy. "I would argue that this is the most influential Canadian band of the 1980s," Boeckner proclaimed, calling them, "a totally misunderstood and under-appreciated band in its own country...without this band you wouldn't have Nine Inch Nails (and) Ministry." Boeckner goes on to explain that Canadian taste-makers have "pretty much erased these guys from the history books." There was much more to be said about all of the records picked by the two band mates, making for an insightful and fun What's In My Bag? interview. 

Canadian indie rock band Wolf Parade formed in 2003 when former Frog Eyes member Spencer Krug found himself with three weeks to get a group together. He teamed up with Dan Boeckner (ex-Atlas Wolf Parade Cry Cry CryStrategic) and the pair began writing songs in Krug's apartment, accompanied by a drum machine. Arlen Thompson eventually took over percussionist duties. A year later, the group traveled to Portland to work with Modest Mouse's Isaac Brock on their self-titled Sub Pop debut EP. The current lineup solidified when Dante DeCaro (ex-Hot Hot Heat) signed on in 2005.

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Happy Discovery Day -- Real Geographic Discoveries of the Modern Age

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 13, 2014 04:42pm | Post a Comment
Portrait of Columbus

I will not make the argument that Columbus's arrival in the New World was insignificant merely because he was an absolutely awful person or because he didn't actually discover anything (which he himself maintained, claiming until his death that he'd merely found a different route to Asia). But think about this before you dismiss -- before Columbus, avocado, bell peppers, blueberries, cashews, cassava root, chili peppers, chocolate, cocaine, gourds, maize, peanuts, pecans pineapples, pumpkins, squash, tobacco, tomatoes, and vanilla were all unknown in the Old World and alcohol, apples, bananas, barley, cheese, coffee, mango, onions, rice, tea, and turnips, and wheat were unknown in the Americas. Imagine an existence without any of those and you can hopefully begin to get a taste of the importance of the Columbian Exchange. Imagine Italian cuisine without tomato sauce or gnocchi and you can't help but wonder if this is why Columbus is so dear to many Italians. Imagine, on the other hand, genocide, slavery, and old world diseases and you'll understand why he's even more hated by many others. 



The Buck 65 Amoeblog Interview

Posted by Billyjam, March 27, 2011 06:00am | Post a Comment

Canada's ever musically creative hip-hop artist Richard Terfry, who is best known by his stage name Buck 65 (the primary alias of the many that the artist employs), may be celebrating two decades of making music, but many of these 20 odd years were spent under the radar and beyond the glare of the mainstream where the prolific abstract hip-hop artist has been free to delve off into far off musical corners, away from the sometimes restrictive confines of what is often considered "hip-hop." Along the way the always innovative Buck 65 has built an impressive back-catalog of releases.

As well as being an extremely prolific recording artist, the ever active Buck 65 also hosts a radio show on Canada's national station, CBC. His current album, 20 Odd Years, released by Warnera few months ago, is perhaps the artist's most musically adventurous to date. This diverse, collaboration-heavy collection of songs ranges from unbridled b-boy flavor to lushly produced, ethereal-sounding productions. Since its release, the self-described "rap weirdo and international romantic" has been busy getting the word out via Twitter updates, interviews, and shows, including a series of dates at SXSW last week.

This week the Amoeblog caught up with the hella cool and always insightful & articulate MC and turntablist (and fan of Amoeba) to ask him about the last 20 odd years of his music career.

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Jay Silverheels - Happy American Indian Heritage Month

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 24, 2010 02:00pm | Post a Comment
Jay Silverheels

Jay Silverheels was a Kanien'kehá:ka actor born Harold J. Smith on May 26th, 1912. He was born on the Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation reservation, the most populous First Nation in Canada, and the only nation in which all six Iroquois nations live together. He was the third of eleven children born to Major George Smith, the most decorated Native American soldier in the Canadian Army, who served in World War I.



Six Nations

Harold began going by the name Jay and was given the nickname Silverheels when he played on the lacrosse team, the Mohawk Stars, at sixteen. He later moved across the Niagara River to play lacrosse on the North American Amateur Lacrosse Association team, the RochestJay Silverheels er Iroquois. He also boxed and in 1938 placed second in the middleweight section of the Golden Gloves tournament. He lived for a time in Buffalo, where he had his first son, Ron, with Edna Lickers.

The previous year he'd begun working in film, as an extra in the musical comedy, Make a Wish. He married his first wife, Bobbi, and they had a daughter named Sharon. They divorced in 1943. Over the next few years he appeared, usually uncredited, as a stuntman or extra in The Sea Hawk, Too Many Girls, Hudson's Bay, Wester Union, Jungle Girl, This Woman is Mine, Valley of the Sun, Perils of Nyoka, Good Morning, Judge, Daredevils of the West, The Girl from Monterrey, Northern Pursuit, The Phantom, I Am an American, Raiders at the Border, Passage to Marseille, The Tiger Woman, Haunted Harbor, Lost in a Harem and Song of the Sarong.

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Remembering Lenny Breau

Posted by Whitmore, August 12, 2009 09:56pm | Post a Comment

As far as I am concerned, Lenny Breau is arguably the greatest guitarist that ever strummed a chord on this goddamned sweet earth, and yet outside the guitar playing world his name remains virtually unknown. Several years ago I was gigging in Vancouver B.C., Canada and someone asked me who were my favorite guitarists. I mentioned Lenny Breau. I obviously answered correctly; for the next couple of days I had my pick of booze and food aplenty. Though Breau was born in Auburn, Maine, in 1941, he was raised in Canada. His family settled in Manitoba in 1957 and he always remained very connected to his adopted home country. His parents, Hal "Lone Pine" Breau and Betty Cody, were country & western performers active as both a touring and a recording act from the mid 1940's into the late 1950's. Breau’s first professional gigs were with the family act until he was about 15 or 16, when one night his father slapped him on stage for improvising.
 
Lenny Breau's phenomenal technique was a combination of his close study of his idol Chet Atkins, adapting Atkins' picking style of playing bass lines with a thumb pick and with his other fingers adding melody lines -- he was able to sound like two guitarists playing simultaneously -- and his harmonic sensibilities, predominantly influenced by legendary pianist Bill Evans. Along with significant classical, modal, and flamenco elements, not to mention his extraordinary right hand independence and his unique use of artificial harmonics, no one sounded like Lenny Breau.
 
25 years ago today, Aug. 12, 1984, Lenny Breau was found dead in the rooftop swimming pool of his apartment building in Los Angeles. He was 43 years old. During his lifetime Lenny Breau had a long struggle with drugs, especially with heroin, amphetamines and alcohol, something left over from his days on the Toronto jazz scene, but at the time of his death Breau had reportedly managed to take some control of his addictions. On that Sunday, his wife, Jewel Breau, an occasional singer born Joanne Glasscock, claimed that he had accidentally drowned, but an autopsy determined that he had actually been strangled and then dumped in the pool. The Los Angeles Police Department never had enough evidence to bring charges against her or anyone else, but in a 1999 Canadian documentary, The Genius Of Lenny Breau, directed by Breau’s daughter Emily Hughes, Detective Richard Aldahl states that Jewel Breau was the prime suspect. Jewel Breau, now remarried as Jewel Flowers, was never charged in the homicide because detectives thought that the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office couldn’t build a strong enough case to bring her to trial. Ironically, it was Chet Atkins who introduced Lenny Breau to Jewel. Breau's murder remains unsolved.
 
Lenny Breau was buried in an unmarked grave in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale. Funeral expenses were covered by a memorial benefit at Nashville's Blue Bird Café.



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