Amoeblog

Interview With Tony Thaxton of the Bizarre Albums Podcast

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 24, 2020 06:55pm | Post a Comment


 

Tony Thaxton by Brian Keith Diaz
Tony Thaxton by Brian Keith Diaz

By Audra Wolfmann

If you're at all like me (and I have a strong suspicion that you, dear record collector, might be), then you enjoy a deep dive into the dark corners of music history AND you also love a good Novelty album. You grew up cherishing your Dr. Demento collections and World Wrestling Federation LP, but you also burned with questions about that Leonard Nimoy album your parents had next to the hi-fi in the living room. Well, there's a place for us and, of course, it's on the internet in the form of a podcast called Bizarre Albums. Hosted by drummer Tony Thaxton of Motion City Soundtrack, Bizarre Albums serves as a sort of VH1's Behind the Music for the novelties, oddities, and the just plain strange in the wide world of weird records. Since nothing could be farther up Amoeba's alley than celebrating the unexpected vinyl find, we tracked down Tony and asked him about his show and his own record collection.

Amoeba: What makes an album “Bizarre” by your standards?

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Weird Wednesdays this March at the Alamo Drafthouse New Mission

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 4, 2020 04:59pm | Post a Comment

Join us for another month of Weird Wednesdays at Alamo Drafthouse New Mission in San Francisco! This weekly celebration of genre film is a one-way ticket to the fringes of the unknown, where imagination and ambition dance on the graves of logic and reality. From outlaw exploitation classics to inexplicable Hollywood excess, Weird Wednesday showcases mind-blowing genre discoveries that are unlike anything else you’ve ever seen. Check out what what the Alamo has lined-up for March!

LOST HIGHWAY (1997)
Wednesday, March 4. 9:45pm.
After a five-year hiatus following the release of Fire Walk With Me, David Lynch returned with perhaps his most daring and disturbing work since Eraserhead. Lost Highway follows an LA jazz saxophonist’s (Bill Pullman) withering relationship with his wife (Patricia Arquette), who receive cryptic, menacing surveillance tapes of their Hollywood home. As the anxiety within their marriage grows, the logic of time, space, and identity seem to slip away, splintering the narrative into a thrilling, schizophrenic ride down the darkest roads of the human psyche. It's a beautiful edifice of echoes to house an unwaveringly subjective cinema.



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