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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Country Legend Marty Stuart

Posted by Amoebite, November 22, 2017 03:53pm | Post a Comment

Marty Stuart What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

When country music legend Marty Stuart went record shopping at Amoeba Hollywood he couldn't help but run into himself. Whether he found records that he had played on, or records by people he had played with, Stuart found his visit to be a trip down memory lane. Playing professionally from a very early age, he had many an anecdote about the personal significance of each record chosen. Take, for example, The Fabulous Johnny Cash and Flatt and Scruggs' Greatest Hits, the first two records Stuart ever owned. "The crazy part about it," he says, "was the only two jobs that I ever had in my life was with Lester Flatt and Johnny Cash." Now that's something most of us can't claim.

Marty Stuart blends traditional country, rockabilly, and honky tonk sounds to create his own unique style. After teaching himself to play the guitar and mandolin at a young age, he began performing with the bluegrass group The Sullivan Family when he was just twelve-years-old. When he was thirteen, he signed on to perform with Lester Flatt, thanks to a meeting with Flatt's bandmate Roland White. Stuart went on to perform with Vassar Clements, Doc Watson, and Johnny Cash, whose backing band he joined in 1980. He left the band in 1985 to pursue a solo career, eventually signing with Columbia Records and releasing a self-titled debut that garnered him a Top 20 country single via the track "Arlene."

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See Amy Helm at the Grammy Museum Sept. 29

Posted by Amoebite, September 22, 2015 05:10pm | Post a Comment

amy helm

The Grammy Museum presents The Drop: Amy Helm on Sept. 29, sponsored by Amoeba.

Helm will appear in downtown Los Angeles at the Clive Davis Theater for a performance and discussion, hosted by Scott Goldman, VP of the Grammy Foundation. Tickets are $20, and doors are at 7:30 p.m.

amy helm didn't it rain cd

The bluegrass-inspired singer/songwriter comes from an estimable pedigree as the daughter of The Band drummer Levon Helm and singer Libby Titus. She has played with her father in the Levon Helm Band and served as a co-producer on his Grammy-winning 2007 album, Dirt Farmer. Now, Levon Helm is a featured drummer on her debut album, Didn’t It Rain, which was released earlier this year. The album features 12 mostly original songs and includes a version of Sam Cooke’s “Good News.”

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Saturday Night at the Carter Family Fold

Posted by Kelly Sweeney Osato, May 30, 2015 08:20pm | Post a Comment
carter family fold hiltons virginia appalachia mountain old time country bluegrass venue A.P.Sara Maybelle music history johnny cash

Deep in the hollows of Southwestern Virginia, near the Tennessee border and about thirty miles or so from any kind of reliable cellular signal, you'll find a low wooden structure pitched into a sloping hillside that faces an unbroken wood, settled at the end of endlessly snaking mountain back-roads that, depending upon your approach, terminate in two right turns around a rusted out passenger railcar resembling a forsaken submarine (what with it's porthole-like windows) swamped by high country grasses. This is Hiltons, Virginia and the venue is the Carter Family Fold, or the Carter Fold, or the fully realized results of local efforts to preserve and present bluegrass and old time country music in honor of traditional American folk pioneers, The Carter Family (specifically A.P. Carter, his wife Sara, and her sister/his brother's wife Maybelle). You'll know you've arrived when clusters of casually parked cars come into view, for that's how I found out for myself last Saturday night, after nearly an hours' passage through pastoral outlands and more than one are we there yet? Here follows a bit of a personal narrative of that night, garnished with a few of the photos I managed to capture.

carter family fold venue sign A.P. Sara Maybelle hiltons virginia bluegrass country music history preservation hall dance flat footin tappping appalachian american folk traditional old time music
Before stetting foot into the Fold itself, the frantic meter of "Cotton Eye Joe" became more discernible with every step I took, the muffled twangs and drawls of banjo and fiddle battling for supremacy in the space between verse and chorus only just audible behind the front entrance. Once through the door, another sound altogether becomes jarringly apparent: the arrhythmic clatter of untold multitudes of tap shoes scuffing up a hard surface like lazy rain drizzling hot fryolator oil. The cacophony is hypnotizing. Inside, at the ticket booth, my father proceeds to pay the price of admission for all us kin and then some, and brooks no refusals as usual. I pay a smidge extra for a Carter Family placard fan for good measure - no telling what the weather's like all the way inside.

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Earl Scruggs, 1924 - 2012

Posted by Job O Brother, March 29, 2012 12:01pm | Post a Comment
R.I.P.
Earl Scruggs


Raising Sand

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 18, 2007 02:18pm | Post a Comment

Perhaps the strangest thing about Raising Sand, the magical collaboration between fiddler/chanteuse Alison Krause and rock god Robert Plant, is how much of a leap each of them had to take to record it. For both, they claimed that the recording required them to step out of their usual bailiwicks-- bluegrass and rock-- and into other song realms. But when you consider that bluegrass and rock are all basically offshoots of folk and blues, how could the jump be that hard?


The answer lies in their innate musicianship. Each of them understands their respective genres so profoundly, that any skitter outside of the “box” involves for them all new landscapes of vocalizing, arranging, and experimentation. To the rest of us it just sounds like more great-American music.

 

The difference comes down to small things. Plant, who admitted never really singing harmony before, says the project was a whole new, and therefore intimidating, song structures and performed bits that she says she would never have chosen for herself. experience. And as for Krauss, she says that she stepped out of her normal Bluegrass

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