Amoeblog

(Wherein which you may get cancer.)

Posted by Job O Brother, April 11, 2010 03:33pm | Post a Comment

Recently, one of my boyfriend’s favorite celebrities died from one of his least favorites diseases.

Dixie Carter passed away April 10, of complications from endometrial cancer.








Cancer has been an unwelcome houseguest in our lives for a while now. The boyfriend’s from the Lone Star State, where getting cancer seems to be as common as sequenced sweaters and tuxedos matched with leather boots. The stars at night are big and bright deep in the heart of Texas, but so it seems are a few malignancies.

No amount of my assurances will convince the boyfriend he won’t necessarily get cancer; it’s neither a birthright, nor a curse – but he’s already decided which hospital will treat him and where to find the best wig for the occasion. It’s the “wedding day” daydream equivalent for the hypochondria set.


My Grandma went to Carlsbad Caverns and all I got was this lousy CANCER.

With little provocation, the boyfriend will rattle off a list of people, both family and family friends, who’ve joined the Malignant Neoplasm Achievers Club as though it’s proof that “In the future, everyone will get cancer for 15 minutes.” I explain that I’m Swedish and we don’t need tumors to feel a sense of impending death – we can see it reflected in our morning cornflakes, a blue sky, or in the smiles of children.

My arguments to not fear cancer really took a hit when our dearest friend, Jenny, was diagnosed with breast cancer just before Christmas. (“Thanks, Santa!”) Watching her deal with treatment with the poise and defiance she’s displayed has been inspirational, even as it’s made our whole lives seem like a subplot on thirtysomething. While I love Jenny, I’m totally not into her cancer, and I wish she’d stop having it.

Anyway, I thought it might be both delightful and macabre (a charming combination, I think) to collect some movie clips and songs by various Homo sapiens who’ve had cancer.

Enjoy?



































Happy Easter

Posted by Whitmore, April 12, 2009 10:00am | Post a Comment

DEALING WITH HECKLERS

Posted by Billyjam, February 29, 2008 06:10am | Post a Comment

The act of heckling performers has to be as old as time itself. I'd bet even way back in the prehistoric, early days of mankind that whenever one cavemen got up to entertain his fellow cave dwellers that some neanderthal in the group would heckle him midway through his bit.

It just seems to be part of the human condition for those in the peanut gallery to feel the need and right to shout out their criticisms, even if unjustified, at those giving their all onstage. Those onstage include stage actors, musicians, comedians (perhaps the number one target of hecklers), and even politicians.  Additionally many self appointed critics have also been known to scream out their feelings at the movie screen, proving that heckling is meant as much for the benefit of fellow audience members as for the performer(s).

And even though it comes with the territory, especially for stand-up comedians, it has to be pretty tough for those up onstage, already performing a demanding draining job, to have some uninvited (often drunk) loud-mouthed bozo scream out his/her dissatisfaction with your performance.  For the rest of the audience, however, a heckler hounding a performer can often result in some entertaining interplay between the two parties. Of recent performer/heckler altercations, probably the one that first pops into most minds is the November 2006 incident at the Laugh Factory comedy club where Michael Richards (aka Seinfeld's Kramer) went off on a nasty tirade on some African American audience members (see below).  How he handled it is a textbook case of what not to do if you wish to remain active in showbiz, especially in these camera phone/YouTube digital days when every move is being documented to be later used against the respective parties.

But every performer handles hecklers differently and it is pretty interesting to study the different approaches applied.  Below I have included video clips of some that deserve a peep, such as the late great stand up comic Bill Hicks who, in a bit that superficially seems to rival Kramer's, really rips into a female audience member-- even using the "C" word  on this woman.  But the key difference is that, even in his most riled rant, he stayed in control and remained entertaining -- even if the audience didn't know where he was going with the bit. And at the end he made fun of himself.  More importantly, it was within character - the sort of thing that you might expect from the notorious comedian who ruffled many feathers by always telling it like it is (or was).

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