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Peter Murphy Residency at The Chapel in San Francisco

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, February 24, 2019 06:24pm | Post a Comment

Peter Murphy at Amoeba SF

Amoeba Music, (((folkYEAH!))), and The Chapel proudly present a unique career-spanning residency Peter Murphy San Francisco Residencywith the “Godfather of Goth,” Peter Murphy, at San Francisco's The Chapel, March 5th through March 27th! Murphy will join SF audiences for 14 nights and 17 shows, performing legendary albums in their entirety from throughout his career.

First emerging from the British underground in the late '70s, Murphy (along with bandmates Daniel Ash, David J, and Kevin Haskins) fronted the groundbreaking, iconic post-punk band Bauhaus, which spawned four seminal albums as well as keystone singles “She's In Parties,” "Silent Hedges,” and, of course, "Bela Lugosi’s Dead," before disbanding in 1983. Murphy launched a successful solo career with Should the World Fail to Fall Apart in 1986. 

Three of these soon-to-be legendary shows (3/21-3/23) will be all-Bauhaus sets featuring special guest David J, and the last two shows (3/26 & 3/27) are tributes to David Bowie.

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David J Book Signing at Book Passage in Corte Madera

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 13, 2014 04:30pm | Post a Comment

David J Who Killed Mister Moonlight Book

Join Amoeba Music and Book Passage in welcoming David J. Haskins to Book Passage in Corte Madera on November 7th at 7pm for a signing of his new book Who Killed Mister Moonlight?: Bauhaus, Black Magick, and Benediction!

david jDavid J (bassist for the legendary groups Bauhaus and Love and Rockets) begins with the creation of Bauhaus’s seminal debut hit "Bela Lugosi’s Dead," and offers a no-holds-barred account of his band’s rapid rise to fame and glory in the late '70s, their sudden dissolution in the '80s, and their subsequent — and often strained — reunions. In between, he explores his work as a solo performer and with acclaimed trio Love And Rockets — culminating in the devastating fire that ripped through the sessions for their 1996 album Sweet F.A. He also delves deep into his exploration of the occult, drawing together a diverse cast of supporting characters, including William S. Burroughs, Alan Moore, Genesis P. Orridge, and Rick Rubin. Bristling with power and passion, music and magic, Who Killed Mister Moonlight? is a rock & roll memoir like no other.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with David J.

Posted by Amoebite, July 15, 2014 12:57pm | Post a Comment

David J.

David J. is probably the only member of seminal post-punk/goth band Bauhaus to release a Britney Spears cover. The song shows up as a bonus track on David's latest album, An Eclipse of Ships, and naturally it's a jazzy, film noir-influenced take on the pop singer's "Toxic." Fittingly, the video for the track features adult film star/industrial musician Sasha Grey; after all, this is the man who named his band Love and Rockets after one of the first alternative comics and who wrote a play about doomed Warhol starlet Edie Sedgwick. True to the DIY roots of the UK punk scene in which he made his name, David's most recent album was entirely crowd funded through Kickstarter.

Recently, David J. swung by Amoeba Hollywood to share some of the music that shaped his career and some of the newer artists who inspire him today. He kicks off this installment of What's in My Bag? with Oil City Confidential, a rockumentary about Dr. Feelgood, a British pub rock band with a huge influence on the early punk scene. He then shows off an LP copy of Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg's album together, because, as he says, "you can't beat vinyl." Soon afterwards, David selects the new LP by his buddies and similarly Gainsbourg-influenced bossa nova stylists Thievery Corporation.

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We just tell it how we see it, nothing more, nothing less -- Neue Sachlichkeit in film

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 26, 2014 06:12am | Post a Comment
Albert Renger-Patzsch, Hochofenwerk Herrenwyk, Lübeck, 1928
Albert Renger-Patzsch's Hochofenwerk Herrenwyk, Lübeck (1928)


Germany
's interwar Weimar Republic may've existed amidst political chaos but it was an incredibly fertile time for the arts. German Expressionism, although it first developed around 1900, only flowered on the screen during the interwar period. Emerging Fascists enjoyed the themes of  Arnold Fanck and Leni Riefenstahl's Mountain Movies. Less well-remembered today was the New Objectivity, an movements whose chief practitioner in film was G.W. Pabst, whose debut film, Der Schatz (The Treasure - 1923), opened in theaters on today (26 February) in 1923.

August Sander The Architect Hans Heinz Luttgen and his Wife Dora 1926
August Sander's The Architect Hans Heinz Luttgen and his Wife Dora (1926)

German Expressionism, the best known cinematic expression of the culture and era, first arose in poetry and painting but ultimately made its way to the screen, exemplified by excellent and still widely-enjoyed films like Der Student von Prag (The Student of Prague), Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari (The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari), Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam (The Golem), Der müde Tod (Destiny), Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (Nosferatu), Schatten, Eine nächtliche Halluzination (Warning Shadows), and Der letzte Mann (The Last Laugh). The Mountain Movies, or Bergfilm, are generally viewed less seriously as art and are undoubtedly interesting to modern audiences primarily for their fascist themes and frequent involvement of Leni Riefenstahl.

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The '80s List: Part 11

Posted by Amoebite, September 5, 2011 11:35am | Post a Comment
Hanoi RocksOne day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

See all entries in our ‘80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Daniel Tures

Sonic YouthDaydream Nation (1988)
The Durutti ColumnLC (1981)
Prefab SproutSteve McQueen (1985)
Van Halen1984 (1984)
Love TractorThemes From Venus (1989)
Tears For FearsSongs From The Big Chair (1985)
The OutfieldPlay Deep (1985)
The Legendary Pink DotsBasilisk (1983)
The JudysWarsharma (1981)
Def LeppardPyromania (1983)

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