Amoeblog

Double Indemnity / Blue Dahlia Fri & Sat @ New Bev

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, January 21, 2010 04:00pm | Post a Comment

The New Beverly couldn't have picked a better week to show these two Raymond Chandler greats. With post New Year's euphoria drying up (who hasn't already had at least one personal let down already?) and a week of L.A. rain, my head is in just the right space to receive Chandler's particular brand of darkness. Granted, he's not the actual writer of the original Double Indemnity story-- that would be the brilliant James M. Cain-- but Chandler and director Billy Wilder took the original novel and tightened it around the edges of the Hays code. D.I. is tight and tense with double entendres strewn throughout, ample location shots and intense performances from its co-stars-- Walter Neff is certainly Fred MacMurray's shining cinematic moment.

IMO the Blue Dahlia is one of Chandler's most underrated efforts; it's also my favorite Veronica Lake film. I'm sure that the fact that Raymond himself badmouthed it from the beginning helped set it on course for secondary status among his fans. I feel it's far superior to This Gun For Hire, which also featured Lake's co-star Alan Ladd. The Dahlia is heavy on atmosphere, quick dialogue, and features a deep supporting cast, including Hugh Beaumont, best known as Ward Cleaver, the father from Leave It To Beaver. Considering that most people only know MacMurray from My Three Sons and Beaumont from the Beav, this double feature goes a long way in showing what cool careers some of the 50's & 60's sitcom actors had before settling down into squaresville.

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Women of the Western

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 16, 2009 06:48pm | Post a Comment
 

Ever since the dawn of film theory, film critics have loved the Western; probably because its engagement with formula and its psychological subtext are so obvious, so close to the surface, that theorizing about westerns is a bit like kicking gravel and striking oil. The genre bears a similarity to tales of knights errant, who similarly were bound by codes of honor and used strength and wit to defeat malevolence, &c &c &c... Part of what makes the Western attractive for film theorists is the way it shifts and evolves too -- spiraling off subgenres like Curry Westerns, Northerns, Oesterns, Red Westerns ands Spaghetti Westerns -- and engages other genres like samurai films and noir. But whereas a little bit of research turns up several scholarly works addressing women's place in the Western, I haven't been able to find any that focus on female-centric Westerns, nor been able to uncover a clever or cutesy name for the subgenre. When I started this blog, I thought I'd come up with a tiny handful, but was quickly surprised at how many Westerns feature females in roles of central importance.

   
Real women of the west. washing clothes (left), famous madame Chicago Joe (center), bandit Belle Starr (right)

The Wild West was, to be sure, a male-dominated place. Of course, there were women too who, just like their male counterparts, were probably more likely to run a ranch or work in town than to find work as gunslingers, bandits and bounty hunters... although there were those too. The National Cowgirl Museum Hall of Fame has, since its founding, sought to better document the contributions of women in the west. Although women in Westerns generally seem to symbolize civilization/the east, making cowboys uneasy with their use of risque talk and their attempts to transport urban conventions to an untamed land, in real life, that role would've been impractical and probably abandoned pretty quickly. When there's work to be done, propriety and traditional societal constructions would just get in the way. In fact, in Wyoming, for example, women gained the right to vote in 1869, over 40 years before the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. The photographs of Evelyn Cameron depict no-nonsense women who have little in common with the dippy, ditzy cowgirls of Gil Elvgren's art or Hollywood cowgirls. Of course, I'm not suggesting that Hollywood is in the business of portraying reality, but it's interesting to look at the decisions they make when constructing mythology.

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