Amoeblog

Artists in the Workforce: 1990-2005

Posted by Whitmore, June 13, 2008 01:21pm | Post a Comment

"Artists in the Workforce: 1990-2005," a 140-page study, was released this week by the NEA and is the first nationwide look at artists and their demographic and employment patterns in the 21st century. The report profiles eleven different artistic occupations, including actors; announcers; architects; art directors, fine artists and animators; dancers and choreographers; designers; entertainers and performers; musicians; photographers; producers and directors; and finally writers and authors. The study draws its conclusions from the U.S. Census Bureau data and other government agencies and arts organizations. Here are some of the NEA’s findings:

Numbering almost two million, artists are one of the largest classes of workers in the nation, representing 1.4 percent of the U.S. labor force. As a group, artists number only slightly less than the U.S. military’s active-duty and reserve personnel, which stands at about 2.2 million. Based on the findings in "Artists in the Workforce," artists earn some $70 billion annually, but the median income from all sources in 2005 for an artist was $34,800, higher than the $30,100 median for the total labor force, but well under the average for professionals of $43,200. And artists generally earn less money than workers with similar education levels.

Between 1970 and 1990, the number of artists more than doubled, from 737,000 to 1.7 million -- a much larger percentage gain than for the labor force as a whole. Between 1990 and 2005, the growth of artists slowed to a 16 percent rate, about the same as for the overall labor force.

Some of the findings were a little surprising. For example, computers have apparently led to a decline in traditional visual artists. There was a huge jump in those who identify themselves as "designers," which includes Web designers. The number of art directors, fine artists and animators fell from around 280,000 in 1990 to around 220,000 in 2005. Designers, nearly 40 percent of all artists, increased from around 600,000 to around 780,000.

Artists tend to be more entrepreneurial -- 3.5 times more likely to be self-employed. And at the same time, artists are underemployed; one-third of all artists work for only part of the year. A couple of examples: only one out of eight actors works full time, and just one out of four musicians.
Artists holding college degrees rose between 1990 and 2005, and they are twice as likely to have a degree as any other U.S. workers. Among artist occupations with the highest educational attainment levels are architects, writers, and producers.

Women remain underrepresented in several artist occupations. Men outnumber women in architecture, music, production, and photography. Women outnumber men in the fields of dance, design, and writing. The percentage of artists who are Hispanic, Asian or Native American grew from 9 percent in 1990 to 15 percent in 2005.

The Pacific Coast region has the highest number of artists per capita, 95 per 10,000. The East South Central, which includes Alabama and Kentucky, has the fewest, 47 per 10,000. And some regions have their own unique concentrations of artists. New Mexico has the highest share of fine artists, mostly due to Santa Fe, which has the second highest number of overall artists per capita. Vermont has the highest proportion of writers, and Tennessee --  mostly due to Nashville -- has the highest proportion of musicians. Las Vegas has the highest rate of dancers and choreographers, whereas Orlando, Fla., home to Walt Disney World, leads the nation in entertainers and performers.

Since artistic employment opportunities are greater in metropolitan areas, nearly 20% of all U.S. artists live in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Washington, and Boston. Los Angeles-Long Beach area has the most artists overall, around 140,000, followed by New York City, around 133,000. And half of all artists live in just 30 different metropolitan areas.

2nd anniversary of Hyaena/a visit to Ravensville May 16-31

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 17, 2008 08:45pm | Post a Comment


Burbank is a city full of little surprises -- over the years I've found a fair share of pleasant surprises scattered across the low lying, rather sleepy little town. Across the street from the fabulous Safari Inn is one of the finest Burbank secrets...Hyaena Gallery. Started by ex-Bostonians Bill & Sherry Shaefer, the space has hosted dozens of art openings, most all of them of a dark or somewhat devious nature. This week marks the beginning of their 3rd year, so come down and check out artist Erin Martinez's collection.  While you're at it, pick up some odd literature, bondage themed hi-ball glasses, or a lovely Art Frahm print.


                
                  Hyaena Gallery   1928 W. Olive Ave. Burbank, CA   91506   1-818-972-2448

Vexing

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 16, 2008 01:04am | Post a Comment

Reading about East L.A. punk while in high school was inspiration. I had known about Los Lobos and knew about the 60’s Chicano bands like El Chicano and Tierra. However, these punk bands were Chicanos and around my age, playing music that I was into. It made me feel less like a freak to know there were others just like me somewhere in the barrios of East Los Angeles. Hippies wanted to move to San Francisco, rockers to the Sunset Strip and I wanted to move to East L.A.

On Saturday, The Claremont Museum of Art will present Vexing: Female Voices from East LA Punk, which will run from May 18 to August 31, 2008. There will be live performances by Vexing artists Teresa Covarrubias (Lead Singer from The Brat) Angela Vogel, Lysa Flores and Alice Bag. I have been looking forward to this exhibit since I heard about it a few months back. The women that are featured in this exhibit were the pioneers of a thriving women's art movement that is happening now in East L.A.

2008 has been turning out to be the year for Retro-Chicano art. LACMA’s Phantom Sightings: Art After The Chicano Movement is currently showing and starting June 15th, LACMA will also feature Los Angelenos/Chicano Painters of L.A.: Selections from the Cheech Marin Collection.

I found some great articles on East L.A. Punk, Vex era and Beyond. The first one is written by Josh Kun and is the story of the Vex. The second one comes from Jimmy Alvarado, who wrote about the history of all the EAST L.A. punk bands that not many have heard about. In this article originally written for Razorcake Magazine. Jimmy covers the minions of pre and post Vex bands as well as all the backyard party giants that were huge in the East Los backyard scene.

Bebe Barron 1925 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, April 29, 2008 12:37pm | Post a Comment

One of the pioneers of electronic music and co-composer of the first all electronic film score, Bebe Barron, died this past April 20th of natural cases at the age of 82. She along with her husband, Louis Barron, who passed away in 1989, composed the sound effects / soundtrack to the 1956 sci-fi classic Forbidden Planet.

Charlotte May Wind (her husband nicknamed her Bebe) was born in Minneapolis in 1925. She earned a degree in music at the University of Minnesota then moved to New York, where she worked as a researcher for Time-Life. Soon after, she met and married Louis Barron in 1947. As a wedding gift the Barrons received a tape recorder and began delving into the world of musique concrete (music created by sounds other than musical instruments, often referred to as “real world” sounds). In 1948 Louis Barron was inspired by the book Cybernetics: Or, Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, by MIT mathematician Norbert Wiener. After studying Wiener’s equations, Louis began building electronic circuits to generate sounds. That combined with recorded tape, created a unique and otherworldly aural experience. After moving to Greenwich Village, the Barrons built a recording studio and became entrenched in New York’s burgeoning avant-garde scene. In their studio they recorded the likes of Aldous Huxley, Anais Nin, Henry Miller and Tennessee Williams reading their work; they also recorded and worked with many like-thinking composers such as John Cage, Morton Feldman, Earle Brown, and David Tudor. In addition, the Barrons scored their first soundtracks to several experimental short films by Ian Hugo, husband of Anais Nin.

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Tristan Tzara

Posted by Whitmore, April 19, 2008 08:16pm | Post a Comment
I often seem to be a bit late in writing about historical events on the anniversary of said occurrence; I blame time itself for not allowing me a few minutes to catch my breath, so here I am, several days late, again, celebrating the birthday of one of my favorite characters of the 20th century.

On April 16th, 1896 Samuel Rosenstock (a.k.a. the once and future Tristan Tzara) was born in Moinesti, Bacau Province in Romania. Most famous as the author of the Dada Manifesto and co-founder in 1916 of the original anti-art and literary movement, Dadaism, along with Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Marcel Janco, Hans Arp and Richard Huelsenbeck, Tzara is often credited with discovering the name Dada. One version of the story has him hanging out at the acting Dada headquarters, the Cabaret Voltaire, in Zurich,Switzerland, and randomly selecting a name by stabbing a French-German dictionary with a knife, picking the word impaled by the blade’s point. Dada is a French child's colloquialism for hobby-horse. If it isn’t true, at least it’s good myth. Besides the knife play and original manifesto, Tzara, as leading agitator, also wrote many of the earliest Dada documents including La Première Aventure céleste de Monsieur Antipyrine (The First Heavenly Adventure of Mr. Antipyrine, 1916) and Vingt-cinq poemes (Twenty-Five Poems, 1918). Some of his later works include his masterpiece L’Homme Approximatif (The Approximate Man, 1931), Parler Seul (Speaking Alone, 1950), and La Face Intérieure (The Inner Face, 1953).

[Last year for Tristan Tzara’s 111th birthday I decided to place 111 pink post-its, each numbered sequentially, on randomly chosen objects- buildings, cars, envelopes, people - anything and everything that got in my way as I carved out my day; I believed it to be a perfectly useless and wanky endeavor to pursue. This year for his 112th birthday I thought I’d celebrate by lying about what I actually did last year. Next year I plan on observing his 113th birthday (and prime number) in Zurich by partying at the remnants of the Cabaret Voltaire, and re-live what I did there 20 years ago; relieve myself on the wall outside, just around the corner from the front entrance, on the side street under the Commemorative Memorial plaque. Of course, I suspect, I’ll re-invent, once again, events in Zurich.]

The original Anti-art artists, the Dadaists, always the provocateurs of their time, launched
one coup after another against the norms of the day. Their iconoclastic impulses torched the sensibilities of the art hierarchy. Their attack on aesthetics collided with audiences and critics and the innocent public at large. Taboo performance art, obscenity crammed prattling poetry, sexual deviancy, religious defilement, corruption of innocence, anti-patriotism might just be the crème brûlée dessert to a meaty confit du canard (confit du connard!?!) table d'hôte of “the sickest, most paralyzing and most destructive thing that has ever originated from the brain of man" (American Art News dated April 2, 1921).  And in return the Dadaists became one of the essential artistic components to the 20th century.

By either hook or by crook, Dada designed, consumed, and sufficiently destroyed the entire repertoire of art criticism psychobabble years before someone spoke the words “post-modern” or “signifier” or “complicity between scientism which underpins the sadism of incessant deconstruction, heightened by the intensity of the pleasure-seeking moment.”

Thank you Tristan Tzara, and all the loons in Zurich. Perhaps Dada never revolutionized 20th century society as profoun
dly as they had wished, but they left an indelible mark on art, literature, film and how and where we stand in a museum today. Happy belated birthday Samuel Rosenstock!
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