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Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography art opening at 1650 Gallery

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 19, 2012 02:16pm | Post a Comment

In a recent poll of Americans conducted by Public Policy Polling, only 33% of respondents said that they view Los Angeles favorably whereas 40% view it negatively. 27% stated that they’re not sure. Of America’s largest five cities (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, and Philadelphia), LA is the only one with a higher negative response than positive. As someone who lives in and loves Southern California, this disappoints but doesn’t surprise me.

  

Growing up in other parts of the country, pop culture sculpted and skewed my perception of the Southland more than anything else. Living here I consider it to be the most misrepresented too. I’ve never been to Philadelphia but my experiences in other large American cities haven’t produced the same sort of glaring dissonance between my expectations and experience that LA has. And with LA the center of America’s pop culture machine, I have to wonder why the city doesn’t do a better job of showcasing its positive attributes instead of its negative – mainly conspicuous consumption, movie stardom and gang culture.

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For Ozoners Only -- On this day, in 1933, the first drive-in theater opened

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 6, 2012 11:22am | Post a Comment
THE FIRST DRIVE-IN


An advertisement for the first Drive-In 

The first drive-in theater opened on 6 June, 1933 at 2901 Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden, New Jersey. It was the invention of Richard M. Hollingshead Jr, who'd began screening films outdoors at his home with a 1928 Kodak projector sat on the roof of his car. He applied for a patent for his "invention" on 16 May, 1933. The feature film shown at his theater was the British comedy, Wives Beware.


The world's first Drive-In Theater

Before long, drive-ins, or automobile movie theaters, were opening in other states. California's first drive-in was the Pico Drive-In at 10850 W. Pico Boulevard, which opened  West Los Angeles in September, 1934. It was demolished in 1947 and was replaced by the Picwood Theatre in 1948. The Picwood closed in 1985, was demolished and replaced with the Westside Pavilion -- which includes the Landmark Theatre.


The Pico Drive-In

DRIVE-INS' PEAK


Although Hollingshead's pioneering theater closed in 1936 after only three years of operation -- a victim of a battle with Paramount Pictures -- the idea was popular although blasting sound outdoors necessitated the theaters being placed in less-developed areas.A major drive-in innovation occurred in 1941, when RCA introduced in-car speakers. Popularity exploded and by 1948 there were nearly 1,000 drive-ins. By the end of the 1950s, drive-ins accounted for 40% of theater grosses. In California, the number of drive-ins peaked in the 1960s, reaching 220.

THE RISE OF HOME VIDEO AND DRIVE-INS' DECLINE




Drive-ins popularity plummeted in the 1970s with the rise of home video's popularity. Family nights out could now be family nights in for the low price of a rental and some microwave popcorn. Betamax was released in 1975. VHS was introduced in Japan in 1976 and the US in 1977. DiscoVision, a precursor to LaserDisc, was introduced in 1978. Our family got our first VCR in 1978, coincidentally the last year the family went to the drive-in that I remember (Rocky at the Circle 25 Drive-In in Lexington, Kentucky -- demolished in 1982).

DRIVE-INS TODAY - CALIFORNIA LOVE


Thou shalt support drive-in theaters!

Nowadays there are about 500 drive-ins operating in the US and California – where cars double as family rooms -- is home to more than any other state. In the Southern California, drive-in lovers have some options.










SOCAL'S DRIVE-INS


The HiWay, SoCal's oldest functioning drive-in

Devil's Night Drive-In
is sort of an improvised drive-in/outdoor screening that takes place in a downtown parking garage at 240 W 4th St and screens mostly '80s movies to car-goers, bike-goers and people seated on a patch of astroturf. On 28 October, 2012 it is scheduled to relaunch as Electric Dusk Drive-In.

The HiWay Drive-In opened in Santa Maria in 1959. Today it’s the only remaining drive-in in Santa Barbara County.

The Mission Drive-In opened in Montclair in 1956 as a single screen. The original screen was demolished and replaced by four smaller screens in 1975. It was later re-named The Mission Tiki Drive-In.

The Paramount Drive-In opened as The Roadium Drive-In in Paramount in 1947. The screen went dark in 1991 and it re-opened in 2014 as The Paramount Drive-In.

The Rubidoux Drive-In opened in Riverside in 1948, with a single screen and amusement park rides thrown in. In 1983, two more screens were added.

The Santa Fe Springs Drive-In opened in 1950 in Santa Fe Springs as the La Mirada Drive-In. In 1965, they added a permanent swap meet – now a common feature at drive-ins. In 1990, in fact, the screen went dark except for rare, special occasions but the swap meet continues.

The Santee Drive-In Theatre opened in Santee in 1958 as a single screen drive-in. Around 1964, a second screen was added.

The Skyline Drive-In opened in 1966 in Barstow and went dark in 1987. In 1996, it re-opened as a single screen and has since added a second.

Smith’s Ranch Drive-In opened in 29 Palms in 1954 and has a pretty small (330 car) capacity.

The South Bay Drive-In opened in 1958 and is San Diego’s last operating drive-in.

The Sunset Drive-In opened in San Luis Obispo in 1950 as a single-screen theater and remains largely unchanged today.

The Van Buren Drive-In Theatre opened in 1964 in the historic Arlington neighborhood in Riverside.

The Vineland Drive-In opened in City of Industry in 1955 and has four screens.

*****

If you've never been to a drive-in show, you really need to do yourself a favor by visiting one in the near future. Especially in SoCal, where you've got great weather, serious car love and a fair number of these treasures still operate.
*****

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Happy Birthday, Los Angeles!!!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 4, 2010 06:27pm | Post a Comment

Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Los Angeles County

Happy Birthday Los Angeles. The City of Angels turns 229 years young today (sort of). Back in 1781, so the story goes, 44 Spaniards from Mexico established El Pueblo de Los Angeles. Of the Spaniards, 26 were black, sixteen were Native or mestizo, and two were white. The city has grown even more diverse in the past two centuries and now L.A. boasts the greatest ethnic and cultural diversity of any city not only in the known universe, but the known space-time continuum.


Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's bird's eye attempt at a Middle Earth style Southland map

Los Angeles also boasts more food trucks, Scientologists, playhouses, Angelenos, lowriders, smog and miles of freeway than any city in the US. A host of surrounding towns put the "great" in "Greater Los Angeles." Any regular readers will know that I like to explore the Southland, in an attempt to entertain and uncover the music, movie, culinary, cultural histories the many and varied communities of the great sprawl -- sort of Los Angeles' extended family.



If interested, please take a look at the list below and click here to vote for more LA neighborhoods, here for LA County communities, and here for OC communities to be the subject of future blog entries. 



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's Map of the Angeles Forest region (Angeles Forest Facebook page)

A

Acton, Agoura, Agoura Hills, Agua Dulce, 
Alamitos Beach, Alamitos Heights, Alhambra, Aliso Viejo, Aliso Village, Alondra Park, Altadena, Anaheim, Anaheim Colony, Anaheim Hills, Anaheim Island, Angeleno Heights, Antelope Acres, Arcadia, Arleta, Arlington, Arlington Heights, Arlington Park, Arroyo Seco, Arroyo View Estates, Artcraft Manor, Artesia, Arts District, Athens, Athens on the Hill, Atwater Village, Atwood, Avalon, Avocado Heights, Azusa...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Antelope Valley (Antelope Valley Facebook page)



B

Balboa, Balboa Highlands, Balboa Island, Balboa Park, Balboa Peninsula, Baldwin Hills, Baldwin Hills Estates, Baldwin Park, Baldwin Village, Baldwin Vista, Bassett, Bay Harbor, Beachwood Canyon, Bel-Air, Bell, Bell Gardens, Bellflower, 
Belmont Heights, Belmont Park, Belmont Shore, Belvedere, Benedict Canyon, Beverly Crest, Beverly Glen, Beverly Hills, Beverlywood, Big Canyon, Big Mountain Ridge, Big Pines, Big Rock, Bixby Hill, Bixby Knolls, Bixby Village, Bluff Heights, Bluff Park, Bouquet Canyon, Boyle Heights, Bradbury, Brea, Brea-Olinda, Brentwood, Brentwood Circle, Brentwood Glen, Brentwood Hills, Brentwood Park, Broadway Corridor, Brooklyn HeightsBrookside Park, Buena Park, Bundy Canyon, Bunker Hill, Burbank, Byzantine-Latino Quarter...



Detail of Pendersleigh & Sons map showing LA County's Channel Islands (Channel Islands Facebook page)

C

Cahuenga Pass, Calabasas,  California Heights, Cambodia TownCameo Plaza, Cameron Woods, Canoga Park, Canterbury Knolls, Capistrano Beach, Carlton, Carroll Park, Carson, Carson Park, Carthay, Carthay Circle, Carthay Square, Castaic, Castaic Junction, Castellammare, Castle Heights, Central Area [Long Beach], Century City, Century Palms, Cerritos, Charter Oak, Chatsworth, Chesterfield Square, Cheviot Hills, Chinatown, Citrus, City Terrace, Civic Center, Civic Support, Claremont, College Park, College Park West, Commerce, Compton, Cornell, Corona del Mar, Costa Mesa, Coto de Caza, Country Club Island, Country Club Park, Covenant Hills, Covina, Craftsman Village, Crenshaw, Crestview, Crestwood Hills, Cudahy, Culver City, Cypress, Cypress Park...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Downtown (Downtown Facebook page)


D

Dana Point, Del Aire, Del Lago, Del Rey, Del Sur, Del Valle, Desert Relief, Desert View Highlands, Diamond Bar, Dove Canyon, Downey, Downtown Industrial District, Downtown Long Beach, Drake Park, Duarte...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Eastside (Eastside Facebook page)



E

Eagle Rock, East Anaheim, East Compton, East Irvine, East La Mirada, East Lake, East Los Angeles, East Pasadena, East San Gabriel, East Village, Eastmont, Eastside [Long Beach], Eastside/Circle Area, Echo ParkEl Dorado, El Dorado Park, El Dorado Park Estates, El Dorado South, El Modena, El Monte, El Pueblo, El Segundo, El Sereno, El Toro, Elysian Heights, Elysian Park, Elysian Valley, Emerald Bay, Encino, Exposition Park...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of The Harbor (The Harbor Facebook page)



F

Faircrest Heights, Fairfax District, Fashion District, Figueroa Corridor, Figueroa Terrace, Financial District, Fletcher Square, Floral Park, Florence-Graham, Flower District, Foothill Ranch, Fountain Valley, 4th Street Corridor, Franklin Hills, Freemont Place, French Park, Fullerton, Furniture & Decorative Arts District...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Hollywood (Hollywood Facebook page)


G

Gallery Row, Garden Grove, Gardena, Garvanza, Glassell Park, Glendale, Glendora, Gorman, Gramercy Park, Granada Hills, Green Meadows...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Inland Empire

H

Hacienda Heights, Hancock Park, Hansen Hills, Happy Valley, Harbor City, Harbor Gateway, Harbor Pines, Harvard Heights, Hawaiian Gardens, Hawthorne, Hel-Mel, Hellman, Hermon, Hermosa Beach, Hidden Hills, Highland Park, Hillside Village, Historic Core, Historic Filipinotown, Hollywood Dell, Hollywood Heights, Holmby Hills, Home Junction, Huntington Beach, Huntington Harbour, Huntington Palisades, Huntington Park, Hyde Park...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Mideast Side (Mideast Side Facebook page)


I

Imperial Estates, Industry, Inglewood, Irvine, Irwindale, Island Village...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartpgraphy's map of Midtown (Midtown Facebook page)


J

Jefferson Park, Jewelry District, Juniper Hills...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of North Orange County
 

K

Kagel Canyon, Kenter Canyon, King Estates, Kinneloa Mesa, Kinney Heights, Kite Hill, Knollwood, Koreatown...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Northeast Los Angeles (NELA Facebook page)


L

La Brea-Hancock, La Cañada Flintridge, La Cienega Heights, La Crescenta-Montrose, La Habra, La Habra Heights, La Marina Estates, La Mirada, La Palma, La Puente, La Tuna Canyon, La Verne, Ladera Heights, Ladera Ranch, Lafeyette Park, Lafeyette Square, Laguna, Laguna Beach, Laguna Canyon, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Woods, Laguna Woods Village, Lake Balboa, Lake Forest, Lake Hughes, Lake Los Angeles, Lake View Terrace, Lakewood, Lakewood Village, Lancaster, Larchmont Village, Largo Vista, Las Flores, Laurel Canyon, Lawndale, Leimert Park, Leisure World, Lennox, Leona Valley, Lido Isle, Lincoln Heights, Little Arabia, Little Armenia, Little Bangladesh, Little Ethiopia, Little India, Little Osaka, Little Saigon, Little Seoul, Little Tokyo, Littlerock, Llano, Lomita, Long Beach, Long Beach Marina, Longwood Highlands, Los Alamitos, Los Altos, Los Angeles International Airport, Los Cerritos - Virginia Country Club, Los Feliz, Loyola Village, Lynwood...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Northwest County (Northwest County Facebook page)



M

MacArthur Park, Magnolia Square, Malibu, Manchester Square, Mandeville Canyon, Manhattan Beach, Mar Vista, Maravilla, Marina Pacifica, Marina Peninsula, Marina del Rey, Marquez Knolls, Mayflower Village, Maywood, Melody Acres, Melrose District, Melrose Hill, Memorial Heights, Mesa Verde, Midway City, Miracle Mile, Mission Hills, Mission Viejo, Modjeska Canyon, Monarch Beach, Monrovia, Montebello, Montecito Heights, Monterey Hills, Monterey Park, Morningside Circle, Mount Olympus, Mt. Washington...




Penderslieigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Pomona Valley (Pomona Valley Facebook page)

N

Naples, Neenach, Nelie Gail Ranch, Newport Beach, Newport Coast, Nichols Canyon, North El Monte, North Hills, North Hollywood, North Industrial District, North Laguna Hills, North Long Beach, North University Park, Northridge, Northwood, Norwalk...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the San Fernando Valley (Valley Facebook page)
 

O

Oakwood, Old Bank District, Old Lakewood City, Olinda Village, Olive, Olive View, Olympic Park, Orange, Orange Hills, Orange Park Acres, Outpost Estates...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the San Gabriel Valley (SGV Facebook page)
 

P

Pacific Palisades, Pacoima, Palisades, Palisades Highlands, Palmdale, Palms, Palos Verdes Estates, Panorama City, Paramount, Park Estates, Park La Brea, Park Mile, Pasadena, Pearblossom, Penninsula, Picfair Village, Pico-Union, Pico Del Mar, Pico Park, Pico Rivera, Placentia, Platinum Triangle, Playa Vista, Playa del Rey, Plaza, Point Fermin, Poly High, Pomona, Porter Ranch, Port of LA, Portola Hills...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM Facebook page)

Q

Quail Hill, Quartz Hill...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the South Bay (South Bay Facebook page)
R

Rancho Estates, Rancho La Tuna Canyon, Rancho Palos Verdes, Rancho Park, Rancho Santa Margarita, Redondo Beach, Regent Square, Reseda, Reseda Ranch, Reynier Village, Ridgewood-Wilton, Rolling Hills, Rolling Hills Estates, Rolling Hills Highlands, Roscomare Valley, Rose Hill, Rose Hills, Rose Park, Rossmoor, Rowland Heights, Rustic Canyon...


Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of South LA's Eastside (South LA's Eastside FB page)

S

Saint Mary's, San Clemente, San Dimas, San Fernando, San Gabriel, San Joaquin Hills, San Juan Capistrano, San Juan Hills, San Juan Hot Springs, San Marino, San Pedro, Santa Ana Heights, Sandberg, Santa Ana, Santa Clarita, Santa Fe Springs, Santa Monica, Santa Monica Canyon, Santiago Canyon, Santiago Hills, Sawtelle, Seal Beach, Sepulveda, Shadow Hills, Shady Canyon, Sherman Oaks, Sherman Village, Shoreline Village, Sierra Madre, Sierra Vista, Signal Hill, Silver Lake, Silverado Canyon, Skid Row, Solano Canyon, South Brentwood, South Carthay, South Central, South El Monte, South Gate, South Laguna, South of Conant, South Park, South Pasadena, South Robertson, South San Gabriel, South San Jose Hills, South Shores, South Whittier, Spaulding Square, Spinnaker Bay, Spinnaker Cove, St. Andrews Square, Stanton, Stearns Park, Stevenson Ranch, Stonehurst, Stratford Square, Studio City, Sun Valley, Sun Village, Sunland, Sunny Hills, Sunrise, Sunset Beach, Sunset Heights, Sunset Hills, Sunset Junction, Surfside, Sylmar...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of South LA's Westside (South LA Westside FB page)



T

Talega, Tarzana, Tehrangeles (Little Persia), Temple-Beaudry, Temple City, Terminal Island, Thai Town, The Gardens, The Village, Three Arch Bay, Toluca Lake, Toluca Woods, Tonner Canyon, Topanga, Torrance, Toy District, Trabuco Canyon, Trabuco Highlands, Traffic Circle, Tujunga, Turtle Rock, Tustin, Tustin Foothills, Tustin Legacy, Tustin Ranch, Two Harbors...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of South Orange County

U

University Hills, University Park, University Park Estates...




Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of Southeast County (SELACO FB page)


V

Val Verde, Valinda, Valley Glen, Valley Village, Valyermo, Van Nuys, Venice, Venice Canals, Ventura Business District, Vermont Knolls, Vermont Square, Vermont Vista, Vernon, View Heights, View Park-Windsor Hills, Villa Park, Village Green, Vincent, Vinegar Hill, Virgil Village, Vista del Oro...


Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of The Verdugos (Verdugos Facebook page)



W
 
Wagon Wheel, Walnut Park, Walnut, Warner Center, Watts, Wellington Heights, Wellington Square, West Adams, West Alameda, West Athens, West Carson, West Compton, West Covina, West Garden Grove, West Hills, West Hollywood, West Long Beach, West Park Terrace, West Puente Valley, West Toluca, West Whittier-Los Nietos, Westchester, Westdale, Western Heights, Westgate, Westlake, Westlake Village, Westminster, Westmont, Westridge Heights, Westside Village, Westwood, Westwood North Village, Westwood, Village, Whalers Cove, Whitley Heights, Whittier, Wholesale District, Willmore City, Willowbrook, Wilmington, Wilshire Center, Wilshire Highlands, Wilshire Park, Wilshire Vista, Windsor Square, Windsor Village, Winnetka, Woodbridge, Woodbury, Woodland Hills, Wrigley Heights, Wrigley North, Wrigley South...



                      Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's map of the Westside (Westside Facebook page)



Y

Yorba Linda, Yucca Corridor...



Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography map of The County of Los Angeles


Z

Bud Browne 1912 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, July 31, 2008 08:32am | Post a Comment


Last week ‘the father of surf films,’ Bud "Barracuda" Browne, the onetime lifeguard who began showing his 16-millimeter movies commercially in the early 1950’s, died in his sleep at his home in San Luis Obispo. He was 96.

Born July 12th, 1912, in Newtonville, Massachusetts, Browne began swimming competitively at age seven. He attended USC, was captain of the swim team and in 1933 ranked second in the nation as a collegiate swimmer. While working as a lifeguard at Venice Beach in late thirties, Browne was introduced to surfing. In 1938 he went to Hawaii to ride the big waves in Waikiki, taking along an 8-millimeter movie camera to film the local surfers. One his first and most prized reels of film recorded the legendary king of the surfers Duke Kahanamoku.

During World War II, Browne served as a navy chief specialist in athletics (earning the nickname "Barracuda" for his long lean look). Following the war he became a teacher in Los Angeles, working as a middle-school physical education instructor and also attended USC Film School. He upgraded his camera to a 16-millimeter Bell & Howell. In 1953, after spending several years filming surfers in Hawaii, Browne pieced together enough footage to compile a 45-minute film. Hawaiian Surfing Movie debuted at John Adams Middle School in Santa Monica.

Browne eventually gave up his teaching gig and took to chronicling the 1950’s surf scene full time, releasing at least one movie a year between 1953 and 1964. With films such as Trek to Makaha, The Big Surf, Surf Down Under, Cavalcade of Surf, Locked In and Gun Ho!, Browne documented all the surfing greats of the longboard era, like Phil Edwards, Buzzy Trent, Greg Noll, Miki Dora, Linda Benson and Dewey Weber, plus the first-generation of shortboard riders, like David Nuuhiwa, Nat Young and Gerry Lopez. In addition to completing nearly 20 of his own films, he also contributed footage to other projects such as Big Wednesday, directed by John Milius, Greg McGillivray/Jim Freeman’s Waves of Change (also known as The Sunshine Sea) and their 1972 classic Five Summer Stories. In the early 1990’s Browne began re-editing some of his earlier efforts. The first project, Surfing the 50's, honed his best color footage from the eight films he produced during the fifties. That success led to re-releasing some of his other movies such as the 1963 classic, Gun Ho!.

As a surf-film pioneer, Browne had a huge influence on those who came after him like Bruce Brown (The Endless Summer) and photographer John Severson. Bud Browne was inducted into the International Surfing Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame in 1996. This past March, he was honored at the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival for his lifetime achievements to the genre of surf films.

Here is some of Browne’s footage used in a Hamms Beer commercial from 1965.

Boyd Coddington 1944 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, February 28, 2008 10:36am | Post a Comment


As a kid I grew up around Southern California’s custom car culture. My Dad did custom auto body, paint and design. He was constantly chopping, welding, re-chopping, re-welding, filling in some Bondo here, pounding out a dent, re-filling in some Bondo there, pounding out another fender, painting, taping off, re-painting, all performed on some innocent Detroit family car, transforming your average Ford or Chevy into some kind of mutant So-Cal testosterone by-product of too much sun and youth. The smell of Bondo, the polyester fiberglass resin used to fill in holes, is the smell that takes me back to my childhood!  I may just drive a ’97 Toyota, but my heart has always been wrapped around the 1934 Ford Roadster my Dad owned when I was a kid. There was, and is, nothing like cruising around town in a hot rod - the rumble of glass-packs, or the pure simple beauty of pin stripping or the swagger of flames painted across the polished curves of a vintage fender and hood.

West Coast custom car-building legend Boyd Coddington has died at the age of 63.  Coddington had been hospitalized during this past holiday season, but the cause of death has not yet been released.  Born in Rupert, Idaho, in 1944, Coddington started to build cars in his parents' garage as a teenager.  He became a machinist by trade, and at one point worked for Disneyland on the graveyard shift, but by day he would tinker in his home garage producing one car at a time. His designs soon captured the imagination and spirit of Southern Californian car-culture fans. Presently Coddington’s shop in La Habra, California has some 70 employees working in a 50,000 square foot facility which includes an in-house body and paint shop.

Coddington set the standard for workmanship and creativity.  His first claim to fame came with his streamlined re-creation of a 1933 Coupe that won the Al Slonaker Award at the1981 Oakland Roadshow, one of hot roddings most prestigious prizes. Boyd's cars have also won "America's Most Beautiful Roadster" an unprecedented seven times, the Daimler-Chrysler Design Excellence Award twice, and he's been inducted into the SEMA Hall of Fame, the Grand National Roadster Show Hall of Fame, the National Rod & Custom Museum Hall of Fame, the Route 66 Wall of Fame, the Street Rod Marketing Alliance Hall of Fame, and was voted "Man of the Year" in 1988 by Hot Rod Magazine. His "Cadzilla" creation is considered to be a design masterpiece, based on a 1950s style Cadillac, it was built for ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons. And one more unusual honor came Coddington’s way: he was to have the only hot rod displayed at the Smithsonian, when his '33 coupe was part of a 1993 exhibit titled "Sculpture on Wheels."

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