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Record Store Day 2016 Draws Huge Crowd for Exclusive Releases at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, April 16, 2016 07:49pm | Post a Comment

Record Store Day 2016 at Amoeba Hollywood

Hundreds of vinyl collectors and music fans of all ages gathered in the wee hours of the morning on April 16th to celebrate Record Store Day at Amoeba Hollywood. By 7 a.m., a line stretched down Ivar Avenue, coiling around the back parking lot in anticipation for the store’s opening.

record store day 2016 line

Folks brought chairs and showed up at daybreak to score exclusive RSD releases from Madonna, Lush, Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Deftones, J Dilla and many more. As we started ringing up RSD customers at 9:15 a.m., those sought after titles were going like hotcakes, such as Mexican-America metal band Brujeria’s satirical Viva Presidente Trump! LPs in various colors.

kids on record store day 2016

Familiar faces from years past joined young’uns gunning for releases by the likes of Gerard Way, Mac DeMarcoRun the JewelsTwenty One Pilots and The Weeknd. Given that it was our ninth go around with RSD, things seemed to be moving as smoothly as possible. By midday, releases by The DoorsFleetwood MacRegina SpektorDeath Cab For Cutie and others were already sold out.

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Show-Me Hollywood -- Missourians in Hollywood on Missouri Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 16, 2013 12:00pm | Post a Comment
Happy Missouri Day! I was not born in Missouri but I count myself fortunate to have grown up there, moving to the Show-Me State from Kentucky when I was four and staying until I was sixteen. Of course, I ended up moving west (St. Louis is the Gateway to the West after all) to the great state of California, following in the footsteps of many before me. For this blog entry, I'd like to honor Missouri natives who worked in Hollywood film.

Pendersleigh & Sons Cartography's Map of Missouri

Also, there's some sporting event involving a cricket-derivative going on right now between Los Angeles and St. Louis -- arguably the greatest cities in their respective states (well, arguable in St. Louis's case). So forgo your animal-style friesCool Ranch tacosFrench Dipskogi tacos, and Mission burritos for one day and prepare a feast of BBQCherry Mashesgooey butter cakeOzark PuddingSt. Louis-style pizzaSt. Paul sandwiches, and toasted ravioli as we honor the Missouri-Hollywood connection.

Record Store Day 2013 at Amoeba Hollywood - Part 2

Posted by Amoebite, April 20, 2013 07:03pm | Post a Comment

Record Store Day moved into Saturday afternoon at Amoeba Hollywood with a DJ set by Lance Rock, a former Amoebite and current Yo Gabba Gabba! ringleader. Lance has always had exceptional musical taste and it was a treat to hear his soundtrack for one of our busiest days of the year. A handful of kids turned out, excited to see DJ Lance Rock in person.

Lance Rock at Amoeba Hollywood Record Store Day

Lance Rock at Amoeba Hollywood Record Store Day

Next up was Lucinda Williams, who chatted with fans and picked out a playlist of her favorite songs, including gypsy jazz, Mark Lanegan and Chelsea Light Moving.

Lucinda Williams at Amoeba Hollywood for Record Store Day

Lucinda Williams at Amoeba Hollywood for Record Store Day

Lucinda Williams' playlist

It was been an incredibly busy morning (and afternoon) with the lines wrapping around the store. The main line for the registers even extended into the jazz room and bumped up against the prize wheel line at one point! But by about 5pm, things had slowed just enough to let us move the line for RSD13 titles into the store and put the remaining releases on the floor.

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Vietnamese New Wave - Part I - German Euro-disco

Posted by Eric Brightwell, January 8, 2008 10:14pm | Post a Comment
Vietnamese New Wave

Are any of my readers out there Vietnamese? I was turned on to this amazing genre by "the Jewel of La Puente," the one and only (OK, one of thousands but still one of a kind) Ngoc Nuyen. I have asked the experts here at Amoeba Hollywood about "Vietnamese New Wave" (also referred to as Asian New Wave at times) groups and no one seems even remotely familiar with any of them, with the exception of Chris Matthews, to whom "Modern Talking" sounds familiar ...

First of all, when people talk about Vietnamese New Wave, they’re not talking about Vietnamese artists (although there is Thu Thuy, Lynda Trang Dai and supposedly a tieng viet cover of a Night Society song), but rather a movement that includes mostly German Euro-disco, Italo-disco and English synthpop artists who acquired, through means that no one seems to understand (although it definitely involves mixtapes) massive popularity amongst Vietnamese in Cali, Texas and Canada (and maybe elsewhere).

And whilst there’ve been at least four or five documentarians who’ve explored the still supposedly strange popularity of Morrissey amongst Mexicans and Mexican-Americans, to my knowledge no one has yet delved into the mysterious “Vietnamese New Wave” movement in which (in addition to OMD, Pet Shop Boys and Gazebo's "I Like Chopin") four German performers, with no radio play, no MTV exposure, no Amazon recommendations, no local performances came, against all odds, to achieve stardom in the Vietnamese immigrant population.

To start with, the term “new wave” as used in music means many different things to different people. History records that Sire records head Seymour Stein was the first to borrow the term from the 1950s and 60s film movements from Europe to describe the bands that played at CBGB like Blondie and the Talking Heads. Before long it seemingly became applied to any band formed after 1976 and was applied to such musically dissimilar artists as Spandau Ballet, Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, the Thompson Twins and definitely anyone with asymmetrical hair or '80s fashions regardless of their sound. By the late '80s, I don't remember anyone really using it anymore. "Alternative" had pretty much replaced it as the term for anything underground or bizarre (at least in Columbia, Missouri, where I was still living.) Anyway, in the context of Vietnamese New Wave, four performers loom large that are pretty much completely unknown by every non-Vietnamese I’ve talked to (except DJ Lance Rock, pictured below, with Vietnamese New Wave expert Ngoc-Thu Nguyen and some people who've never even heard of Modern Talking, including Amoeba blogger Chaz Reece).


Hi-NRG” was a term coined by the UK magazine Record Mirror which had a Hi-NRG chart and was used to describe songs with a staccato sequenced synthesizer as heard in Hazell Dean’s “Searching (I Got To Find a Man)” and Evelyn Thomas’s “High Energy.” This music, filtered through songs like Dead Or Alive’s “You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)” became known as Eurobeat to some, although I had never heard anyone arguing about the distinctions of these sounds until the age of the chatroom, many years later. There's arguements about what’s what and even Freestyle was frequently marketed as Hi-NRG in the US (as well as Latin Hip-Hop and who knows what else). Canadian band Lime was often considered Italo-disco. I’m not an expert but there is a common sound to the stars of Vietnamese New Wave, as I’m sure you’ll hear if you take the time to watch these awesome videos.

In my research I have found that they have a “New Wave Night” at the Shark Club in Costa Mesa on the first Friday of every month (in the Red Room) and it's specifically Vietnamese New Wave, so I’m going to have to check it out for further research and get back to you.


Bad Boys Blue

Bad Boys Blue was formed in Cologne, Germany in 1984 by producer Tony Hendrik and his lyricist wife Karin van Harren. The group itself was comprised of a Brit, an American and a Jamaican. They became most popular in Russia, South Africa and Ukraine.






C.C. Catch

C.C. Catch, born Caroline Catharina Müller in Oss, Netherlands, moved to Germany in the 1970s and eventually teamed up with writer Dieter Bohlen in 1985, who produced all of her hits (well, hits in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland and Yugoslavia) until they fell out in 1989.




Modern Talking

Modern Talking was formed in Berlin by Dieter Bohlen and Thomas Anders in 1984. They split in 1987 after achieving considerable popularity in Argentina, Austria, Finland, Iran, Scandinavia, South Africa and Switzerland. In the UK they were marketed toward fans of gay duos like Erasure, the Pet Shop Boys and trios Bronski Beat and Culture Club, despite their heterosexuality. In their videos and live performances they usually consciously appeared with a measured distance between them, fearing that their assumed gay image was holding them back. In 1985, Thomas Anders began wearing a necklace which spelled out his girlfriend’s name in gold letters.







Sandra

Sandra Cretu (born Sandra Ann Lauer in Saarbrücken, Germany) was in the disco group Arabesque and before she began performing solo as Sandra in 1984. After teaming up with her then boyfriend Michael Cretu, she became immensely popular in Germany, Israel, Lebanon and Switzerland. In America she is still mostly known, if known at all, as the female voice in “Sadeness,” the hit single of her by-then-husband’s group Enigma. She’s the one whispering “Sade, dit moi. Sade donne moi.”

 


Go here for Part II of Vietnamese New Wave!

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Oct Favorites pt. 2

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, October 28, 2007 12:00pm | Post a Comment
 

The second installment in my October favorites series starts with an opera LP from Brazil, it's a single LP of excerpts from Johann Strauss' "O Morcego" or "Der Fledermaus" or "the Bat" if you must.  Issued on the Copacabana label, the sound quality is radio broadcast level and the performance by the Zurich Radio Orchestra is fine, but it's the cover art that makes this a Halloween treat. Cool record store sticker from the Loja Gomes store on Av. Afonso Pena. It appears that the store was once in the center of Belo Horizonte-a huge city about 300 miles above Rio...





Up next...a classic American mix



Folkways and Edgar Allen Poe...Folkways records released this version of the Pit & the Pendulum in 1967, the orator is David Kurlan.  I was abe to dig up a little about  his Broadway work, mostly roles in musicals. He also did a couple of other Folkways voice overs. His reading is straight forward and very effective, kind of like the polar opposite of the Lou Reeds double CD nightmare based on Edgar Allan Poe. The LP comes with a small pamphlet containing instructions for teachers as well a sheet of transparency images for the old mimeograph...





And finally, to round out your night of frights, "The Rite of Exorcism"...on the Crunch Records label.  We will have to forgive those at Crunch for their lack of artistry when it comes to their logo and label.  The design would better suit a community college athletic department, thus breaking the Lance Rock "sports and music NEVER mix" rule, with which I am in complete accord.  Anyhow, the LP starts off with some amazing Satan Fuzz Funk and jumps right into a poor fellows discovery of an Exorcism taking place in a church alongside a lonesome road that he has had the misfortune to be traveling down...some guys have all the luck...There's more musical interludes including a pious Our Father sung by Dorothy Lerner...the mastermind of said effort is the good Rev. Patrick J. Berkery, Ph. D.  AlI I could dig up on the guy was that he's still around in the Catholic Church and that he's quite a prolific writer. Unfortunately his writings seem to emphasize positivity, therefore denying us any follow ups in the exorcisim dept...