Amoeblog

Gina T is coming to LA!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 6, 2010 10:00am | Post a Comment

Gina T

Eurodisco star Gina T is performing Friday, November 12th at the Club 740 in Downtown, Los Angeles in a concert sponsored by Keep On Music (KOM), an organization committed to preserving and spotlighting Italo/Eurodisco -- often aka Vietnamese New Wave.

Gina T is a gold and platinum singer as well as songwriter for other artists. She was born Gina Tielman on October 24, in Bussum, Noord-Holland, Netherlands to Indonesian parents. Music runs in her family; a grandfather, an uncle and her father, Ponthon, were members at various times of The Tielman Brothers, an amazing Indorock band.

 

Her mother, Joyce, was also a famous singer and her brother Nino (aka Mr. Double T) was involved in T'N'T Partyzone, Die Kranken Schwestern and Culture Beat.

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Keep on Music New Wave and '80s Reunion Party - The Vietnamese New Wave Revival

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 9, 2010 07:19pm | Post a Comment



Last November, Keep on Music threw a New Wave + ‘80s Reunion at Bleu in Westminster. This isn’t new wave in the sense that a lot of people use the term, but rather a mix of Italo, Eurodisco and other ‘80s dance music that notably found considerable popularity with Asian-Americans in the 1980s. I was only turned onto the scene four years ago, by Ngoc Nguyen, who is a Vietnamese New Wave super fan (especially of Sandra).

Flash forward to the present and near future: March 27th. On that day, Keep On Music’s having a second New Wave + ‘80s Reunion at the Can Asian Entertainment Bar in Garden Grove. Unlike last time, I won’t miss this one and neither should you! Luckily for us newbs and the uninitiated, some key figures of the new wave scene graciously agreed to sit down with me and answer some questions about the Asian/Vietnamese new wave scene for Eric's Blog

Spacesynth (after a brief bit about Space Disco)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 14, 2008 04:00pm | Post a Comment

 

When you like a lot of the sci-fi movies from the mid-to-late 1970s, you frequently are treated to Rubellian utopias populated by horned-up hedonists, robots who are polished like (coke) mirrors and multi-racial aliens all getting together at the space disco/cantina/casino. As with almost all science fiction, it's more a reflection of the time of it's conception than any like future. This stuff was heavily indebted to the sexual revolution that preceeded it and was wholly clueless about the AIDS epidemic lying around the corner. In the tense, cold-war-fearing 80s, just a few years later, sci-fi frequently fell into two camps. On the one hand you have bands of marauders roaming the post-apocalyptic wastelands in churched-up dune buggies out to terrorize the few remaining civilized humans, who are attempting in a harsh world to preserve culture and science and maybe the knowledge of how to grow food. On the other you have gritty near-futures where market economics and technology have exploded into fearsome things, exploited by crusties who can access the internet through datajacks in their skulls. And they live in cities called Neo Tokyo and the like. But, for now, back to the 70s...

Space Disco was a briefly popular subgenre of disco which melded science-fiction-inspired style, themes and futuristic sounds (like laserguns) to your garden variety disco. It was exemplified by groups like Cerrone, Space and Sheila B. Devotion, although less stylistically single-minded artists like Sarah Brightman ("I Lost My Heart to a Starship Trooper") and Dee D. Jackson ("Automatic Lover") also dabbled in the style. In America, MECO scored a big hit with their discofied version of the theme from Star Wars.

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