Amoeblog

Movies for Mother's Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 10, 2015 08:02am | Post a Comment
Mary Cassatt After the Bath (circa 1901)
Mary Cassatt's After the Bath (circa 1901)

The American Mother's Day was invented by Anna Jarvis in 1905, when her own mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, died. Her mother's death proved the inspiration for a holiday and by 1908 others joined her in this macabre celebration.

After five years of dedication to her obsession, Mother's Day was first observed in West Virginia in 1910. Although writing "I love you" on a post-it note would be more meaningful, by the 1920s consumers dutifully purchased pre-made Mother's Day cards from the Hallmark corporation. Disgusted by this perversion of her crazy vision, Jarvis unsuccessfully tried to kill Mother's Day. 

Whatever you do this Mother's Day, please don't spend $17.95 on a Spring Multicolor Floral Infinity Scarf, $24.95 on a Bronze Metal Birdcage Lantern Wall Decoration, or $29.95 on a Coral-inspired Jewelry Tree. Instead, take her on a hike, go for a swim, eat a type of cuisine neither of you've ever had before, go to the ballet... or watch one of these films.
*****




Mother (마더, Bong Joon-ho, 2010)


Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)



Mildred Pierce
(Michael Curtiz, 1945)

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With VEEP's Timothy Simons

Posted by Amoebite, November 13, 2014 02:04pm | Post a Comment

Tim Simmons

Timothy Simons is an actor best known for his role as Jonah Ryan on HBO's Veep. Ryan is a self-proclaimed "go to guy" as the White House liaison to the Vice President's office. Much to the annoyance VEEPof the Veep staff, character Ryan takes great pride working for the President and not the Vice-President. Ironically, the President cannot stand Ryan, which makes for great comedy. 

Timothy Simons studied theater at the University of Maine and developed his chops with the Chicago-based theatre group, Hypocrites. In 2008, he and his wife relocated to Los Angeles and just two years later, Simons made his television debut on Veep

Simons recently hosted a charity auction at Amoeba Hollywood and saved some time to do a little shopping and film an episode of What’s In My Bag?. He has a bunch of great picks, including several films, as you might expect from an actor who takes his work seriously. Simons starts off with a copy of Puplhead, a collection of essays written by John Jeremiah Sullivan. He makes a point to talk about Blow Out, the 1981 thriller by director Brian De Palma and starring John Travolta as a sound effects technician. Simons also finds the classic Charlie Chaplin film, Modern Times, and picks up a little country music with Doc Watson’s Definitive Collection and John Prine's In Spite of Ourselves.

New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Joe Begos and Josh Ethier

Posted by Amoebite, September 30, 2014 05:56pm | Post a Comment

Joe Begos Josh Ethier

Almost Human Blu-rayFilmmakers Joe Begos and Josh Ethier are the definition of multi-hyphenates. Begos, a writer/director/producer/cinematographer/camera operator/actor teamed up with his longtime friend Ethier, an actor/producer/editor/sound designer/composer to film Almost Human. The sci-fi/slasher flick, set in the pair's native New England and inspired by classic 1980s horror films, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

The pair stopped by Amoeba Hollywood to share some of their top picks for movies and music. Begos starts things off with Brian De Palma's Snake Eyes, which he says is "De Palma's best movie since the '80s." Ethier shows off the beautifully-packaged Death Waltz reissue of John Carpenter's soundtrack to The Fog. Begos talks about the Blu-ray version of William Friedkin's Sorcerer and Ethier discusses Ennio Morricone's score for Dario Argento's The Bird with the Crystal Plumage.

2011: That Which Doesn't Kill Us Makes Things Longer

Posted by Job O Brother, December 13, 2011 11:03am | Post a Comment
vintage father time
"Why couldn't I have been the year with Obamacare?"

Oh, 2011! Can it be it’s only been a year since I knew ye? This was a year of firsts: The first time I had a kitten who liked to lick new, clean plastic with an almost fetishistic zeal; the first year I lived in Los Angeles without working the floor at my beloved Amoeba Music Hollywood (I miss you, desperate holiday shoppers!); the first year I grew more than one grey hair at the same time (I blame you, traffic on Fairfax!)

It was also the year I suddenly, and without any obvious explanation, decided I loved and wanted to see any and all films of the horror genre. This came as a surprise to me. My boyfriend accuses me often of only liking films where nothing ever happens – preferably with a lone clock ticking in the corner of an otherwise quiet room. It annoys me when he claims this, mostly because I cannot defend myself.

The horror section in Amoeba Music’s DVD section provided me with many hours of happy judging-a-book-by-its-cover moments. Some gems I was hypnotized by were…

Phantom Of The Paradise

Posted by phil blankenship, May 13, 2008 12:47pm | Post a Comment