Amoeblog

EVIDENCE OF MYSPACE ARTIST ADVANTAGES

Posted by Billyjam, June 4, 2007 12:20pm | Post a Comment

Although artists today aren't selling nearly as many records and CDs as they were several years back, it is can still be a positive time for them, provided that they can maintain an open mind and realize how to fully utilize and fine-tune the digital age's technologies to their advantage. Case in point is the SoCal emcee EV (aka Evidence of legendary LA hip-hop trio Dilated Peoples' fame), who recently released his debut solo album The Weatherman LP on Oakland's ABB Records (the same label that launched Dilated's career before they signed with Capitol Records). He has witnessed firsthand hip-hop going from being less mainstream, or as he called it, "like the black version of punk rock," to become the pop music form that it is today.


EV, however, still holds tight to rap's punk-like DIY ethic of old and considers new online digital entities like YouTube and MySpace as perfect tools to do-it-yourself and build a fan base from the ground up. "Right now there are only a few outlets that are selling music on a major level. A lot of these stores are closing down. And only two or three rappers went platinum last year. Things are different. It's changing," said EV by phone recently. "It's a changing tide and you've got to figure out how to stay in your ship without sinking in it -- to weather the storm, so to speak, within these next couple of years, because there will be a new outlet, but right now people are scrambling, trying to figure out what to do. So with MySpace and YouTube and a lot of the other dope dot coms and what have you, there's a lot of ways to be heard. Especially doing shows live and networking and gigging and getting out in front of the people and letting them decide how you are live." 

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The Legendary Joe Baiza & The Cardovas Live @ Taix 5/1/2007

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, June 3, 2007 11:48pm | Post a Comment
Joe Baiza is a truly unique guitarist. His guitar playing is a mixture of angular punk rock, free jazz and the funkiness of one who grew up on thousands of R&B albums. His first group, Saccharine Trust, was ahead of their time during their first incarnation. Between the years of 1981 through 1986, Saccharine Trust went from minimalist punk to free jazz and spoken word, confusing most pedestrian punk rockers that wanted to hear hardcore. After Saccharine Trust's demise, Joe Baiza started The Universal Congress Of, a band that further explored his jazz influences. Again, Joe found himself between a rock and a hard place, being too punk for the jazz purists and too jazzy for the alternative rock set. Fortunately for Joe, Universal Congress Of found success in a Europe enthralled in the Acid Jazz movement in the late 80's/ early 90’s.

Joe continued to play in Europe for most of the early nineties until some idiotic German racists shattered his hand during a stay in Germany. He returned to Los Angeles to recover while his bandmates all remained in Germany. Joe decided to stay in L.A., starting a few new groups, The Mecolodiacs and Joe Baiza’s Congress Of, as well as reforming Saccharine Trust in 1999, who he still plays with to this day.

On Friday, I went to check out Joe’s latest musical endeavor at Taix Restaurant in Echo Park, The Cardovas. They played an all-Meters cover set, albeit with Baiza’s flavor. Normally, I don’t like the idea of seeing cover bands, but hey, it’s The Meters! And it's Baiza doing it! As I sat there waiting for The Cardovas to play, I couldn’t help but to look around. Taix looked like a punk rock rest home. I saw many people that I barely recognized from the punk scene back in the day because they look so much older. Some, like Nicky (formerly of the band Pop Defect), looked timeless. Nick is drumming in 3 bands, a sign that playing music will keep one looking young.

The Cardovas came on. It was Joe on Guitar, former Universal Congress Of bass player Ralph Gorodetsky on bass, former Claw Hammer/Devo Bob Lee on drums & vocals and local indie jazz icon Dan Clucas on the cornet. They also had an organ player as well who I did not recognize. They did all The Meters' classics, "Sissy Strut," "Look-Ka Py Py," "I Need More Time," "9 to 5," and, of course, "Cardova."

It was a blast! They were both tight and charmingly sloppy and of course, they had the funk. It was great to see those viejitos go at it. They looked like they were having a great time playing those songs. It made want to get married so I could hire them to play at my wedding.

The last song they played was "Hey Pockey Way," which is not my favorite song due to The Grateful Dead's butchering of it, but it got people up and dancing. Ex-punkers never made great dancers, so it was entertaining to watch them try to shake their thing. The band ended their brief set because they only learned so many Meters songs in the brief time they have played together. It was a bit of a letdown, only because I was having so much fun. I'm looking forward to the next Cardova show to hear what songs they will learn next. My requests: "Go For Yourself" & "Just Kissed My Baby."


Joe Biaza 101

Saccharine Trust:

Pagan Icons (1981)
Surviving You, Always (1984)
Worldbroken (1985)
We Became Snakes (1986)
Past Lives (1988)
The Great One Is Dead (2001)

Universal Congress Of:

S/T (1987)
Prosperous & Qualified (1988)
This Is Mecolodics (1988)
The Sad and Tragic Demise of Big Fine Salty Black Wind (1988)
The Eleventh-Hour Shine-On (1990)
Sparkling Fresh (1992)

Mecolodiacs:

Glamjazz (
1998)

Puttanesca:

S/T (2006)

For more info on Joe Baiza, go here.

Deathstalker

Posted by phil blankenship, June 3, 2007 11:22pm | Post a Comment
 



Starring Lana Clarkson, the woman whom police say Phil Spector killed !

Cocaine Blues

Posted by phil blankenship, June 3, 2007 08:57pm | Post a Comment
 





Lightning Video 9075

Anarchy in the UK - Vivienne Westwood at the De Young

Posted by Miss Ess, June 3, 2007 08:48pm | Post a Comment
Spurred by the looming end of the exhibit, I grabbed my friends Brad and Josh and a few Bob's doughnuts (lemon jelly filled!) and ran to the Vivienne Westwood Exhibit at the De Young Museum.

Based on what I saw, one thing I learned was that Vivienne's clothing is still cutting edge: overwhelmingly so. The exhibit is a complete retrospective of her career, from her punk beginnings in the early 70s to now.  [An aside:  Anyone else wonder what her son with Malcolm McLaren is up to these days?  When you have parents like that, seems like the sky's the limit.]  It's also funny that the clothes Vivienne and Malcolm created together that were so shocking and offensive back in the 70s are now ripped off and mass marketed to every kid who wants some prepackaged rock'nroll edge at Hot Topics across America.  Weird.  Don't people realize what they are purchasing? The fact that every suburban kid these days hits the mall for their "edgy" faux punk gear makes it more difficult to remember that the clothes really were like nothing else when they were originally created, and that a lot of actual, intelligent thought went into the creations.

Here's Miss Vivienne.  They actually had this shirt at the exhibition.

Like my partners in crime for the day, I wished that the exhibit had more photographs of actual people (yes, even models count!) wearing the fashions instead of just faceless mannequins so we could picture them better, but nonetheless the clothing was for the most part gorgeous and incredibly detailed.  Vivienne moved on from punk rock clothing gracefully to play with the old and the new, the high and the low, with many styles including world fusion-y and pirate-y styles in the 80s:
















and on to retro olde U.K. styles, with kilts for men and kilt-esque skirts for women,


and with many stops in between for beading, platformed shoes and unexpected cut outs. 




So many of the shapes, cuts and ideas of her pieces are still worn today, either to a high class event or as street clothes.  The woman is obviously a style icon.  The shop that was the original she opened with Malcolm in the early 70s is still open in London, under her name now, and she has managed to develop herself and her talent from the street's cutting edge all the way to haute couture, which is a truly amazing feat.


Here she is circa nowadays.  Isn't she a playful lady?  So playful.

The exhibition is open till June 10 at the De Young Museum in Golden Gate Park.
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