Amoeblog

Death Dream

Posted by phil blankenship, June 10, 2007 08:39pm | Post a Comment
 



Gorgon Video MP 3054

so real....oh really...is it really so real...songs from jeff buckley...

Posted by Brad Schelden, June 10, 2007 01:56pm | Post a Comment
It is always a little weird when a "new" album comes out  from someone who has died years ago. But I guess not really that weird when you look at the rest of the music industry. Most of the jazz and classical artists have been long dead yet continue to put out new albums. The industry is sometimes built on the collections and live albums of recently departed artists. Albums from Johnny Cash and Ray Charles sold by the millions after their deaths. Maybe its just weird since Jeff Buckley died so young. I can only  begin to imagine the albums he could have continued to put out if he was still alive. After the death of Elliott Smith I had to get rid of all his records. I just didn't really want to deal with the fact he was gone. Listening to his records had been depressing enough when he was alive. I couldn't imagine how much worse it would be knowing he had taken his life.

However, my experience with Jeff Buckley is a bit different. I have to admit I had not really discovered him until after his passing and the release of "Sketches for my Sweetheart the Drunk." This is the album he was working on before his death. It has  now been 10 years since his death. So I have been loving Mr. Jeff Buckley for about 10 years now. The first time I heard him I swore it was some new PJ Harvey songs that I had not heard yet. His voice is really amazing. The songs are all heartbreaking and beautiful. "Sketches" remains one of my favorite albums. There have been a few live and collected albums out in the last 10 years. So  we now get another one." So Real" is a collection of album tracks and live tracks from over the years. I will also admit that I am not usually a fan of  the live album. I would just rather see the live performance in person and listen to the studio album at home. Since I will not get the chance to see him live, this is as good as it will get. The album offers a fairly good introduction to Mr. Buckley.  Included on this compilation is an excellent live version of "So Real." It also includes an unreleased cover of the Smiths song "I Know it's Over." The album is mostly just a selection of songs from "Grace," "Sketches" and "Live at Sin-E" with a couple extras put on. Its mostly just an excuse for me to get obsessed with Jeff Buckley again. I have been listening to this album over and over again. I have also got out all of his other albums and have been revisiting them.

If you don't have any Jeff Buckley albums you really should just start out with the excellent Legacy Edition of "Grace." This is his first and only real studio album. This edition includes the original album Grace. Which is excellent on its own. It includes "Last Goodbye," "Hallelujah," and "So Real." There is also a bonus disc with 13 tracks. But the best part of this collection is the extra DVD. It includes a documentary and the videos from the album. It becomes much more important to have a visual portrait of someone who is no longer around. It offers great insight into the man that is Jeff Buckley. This album is like an emotional roller coaster. It remains a favorite album of many. I know that record companies are often just trying to squeeze some extra money out of their artists that pass away. But I look at it more as a gift to the fans. We really do want anything we can get from these favorite artists of ours. Without any real "new" material its nice to have at least these collections and deluxe editions. They keep me satisfied.

GRAFFITI ART OUTSIDE AMOEBA MUSIC SF, PART II

Posted by Billyjam, June 10, 2007 08:35am | Post a Comment

After yesterday's AMOEBLOG (the first part of this three part showcase of the graffiiti art outside Amoeba Music on Haight St.) two good comments were posted -- both positive/pro graffiti art. Melissa in SF wrote that she is also in favor of graffiti as art but how she'd "wish they'd clean up them big heads in the back...it's all messed up with cheap tags and dirt, and that has been my fave piece forever!" -- this in reference to one of the heads captured in the pic to the left here and also below in four pics. I agree with Melissa. And to me these particular images are just so striking that I literally could stand (or sit) in front of them for hours on end gazing upon their blinding beauty. And truth-be-told, I have spent a lot of time doing just that -- sitting down for long periods and slowly taking in the street art in front of me. It's no different than going to a gallery/museum and allowing ample time to fully absorb an art exhibit. Which reminds me of one time a few years ago downtown San Francisco on opening night for the MoMa for some hot, hot show. I wish I could remember exactly what the new about-to-be-unveiled exhibit was. It was one of those really well-publicized and hyped exhibits that everyone was talking about at the time...kinda like the buzz surrounding the ongoing Vivienne Westwood show in SF. But anyway, the point was that it was opening night and there was a huge mob of people (many there to be seen or to simply chug down the complimentary wine and cheese) all queuing up outside. In fact, the line was so long it snaked all the way down Third Street towards Mission and around the corner down this little alley/side street. But on that side street on that chilly San Francisco evening, as everyone was chatting and looking ahead wishing for the line to move faster, right to their left (behind a wire fence) were all these stunningly beautiful fresh graffiti pieces. But the people in line, anxious to get inside, all seemed to ignore the street art that (in my opinion at the time) was way better than the exhibit inside. The point being that street art, like the graffiti that adorns the outside walls of Amoeba SF and across the street from the store too and all around the immediate Haight Street 'hood, is in reality a wonderful public art gallery there to be enjoyed, and better still, it never has a cover charge.

Continue reading...

Lou & The Trece - Baseball Stories, Part 1

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, June 9, 2007 05:36pm | Post a Comment
I grew up in the seventies and early eighties in Gardena, Ca, a town in the South Bay sandwiched between the hoods of South L.A. on the north and east and the suburbs of Torrance on the west and south. The Mexican gang in my neighborhood growing up was GX13 (Gardena Trece). Most people in the city either feared or loathed GX13. They would graffiti the town overnight with names straight out of a Luis Rodriguez novel. There was Killer, Joker, Puppet, Tiny, names taken out of a Cholo 101 handbook. The local paper would write about Gardena’s gang epidemic and everyone in our small town would get scared. The truth was a lot of these guys in GX13 were young guys who just liked to party and were about as dangerous as puppies. But there were a few snappers in the bunch that were very dangerous and would turn on you in a second. When you hung out with those guys, you always had to keep your guard up.

At the age of twelve, I started to hang out with some of the little brothers of some of the older gangsters. Then the gangsters started to hang out with us at the park. They always seemed to be having a good time and they were proud of who they were. They spoke neither full Spanish nor English, just a concoction of the two languages mixed together adding slang that they picked up from relatives and other vatos. They had Mexican iconic tattoos and drove primered lowriders, ready for the next step into their car’s evolution into lowriderism. As tempting as it was to join that life, my friends and I were intercepted by a man named Louis Marchese. Lou, as we called him, was one of the original members of GX13 when it was a car club in the fifties. It was full of vato locos that smoked marijuana openly in a time before the hippies made it social. He got out of that life when he had a son, who was my age and also playing baseball on our team. Lou spent several years coaching us in little league and playing ball with us every day during the summer in order to deter us from getting into trouble. After long hours of catching and batting practice, the last thing I wanted to do was run around town with the gangsters. I was too beat.

Continue reading...

GRAFFITI ART ADORNS WALLS OUTSIDE OF AMOEBA MUSIC, SF

Posted by Billyjam, June 9, 2007 01:19pm | Post a Comment

                                                                                                                                                                   
I have loved graffiti for as long as I can remember. I guess from when I first saw it way back in the day emblazoned on the sides of New York City subway cars. That was 1978 and I was real young and had arrived in New York City -- fresh off the plane from Ireland -- my first time in America. Arriving in New York City in the late seventies was scary and being faced with the vision of graffiti (something I had never seen before) was at first a shock, but soon it provided a sense of comfort. And within a short time I grew to love this subway and street art that seemed to be everywhere in those days. This was back in hip-hop's early days -- before the so-called "four elements" had been drummed into impressionable minds by "hip-hop academics" -- I.E: people who came to the music/culture after the fact and from outside, but who nonetheless wrote the books (literally) on this culture that they learned of secondhand.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  2078  2079  2080  2081  2082  2083  2084  2085  2086  2087  2088  2089  >>  NEXT