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Amoeba Hollywood World Music Charts For August

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, August 31, 2009 01:10am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Hollywood World Music Top Ten
For The Week Of August 24-31st
:

1. V/A-Sound Of Wonder!
2. Chico Sonido-S/T
3. V/A- Black Rio Vol. 2
4. Bebe-Y.
5. Lila Downs-La Cantina
6. Natalia Lafourcade-Hu Hu Hu
7. Los Amigos Invisible-Commercial
8. Merche-Cal Y Arena
9. V/A-Panama Vol.2
10. Serge Gainsbourg- Initials SG-Best Of Serge Gainsbourg

The Sound of Wonder compilation just edged out Chico Sonido’s self-titled release to take the top spot of the week. At number five was Lila DownsLa Cantina, a release that dates back to 2006. Why, you ask? Perhaps because Lila landed in the hospital last week with a case of appendicitis and had to cancel all her shows in California, including a free show at The Santa Monica Pier last Thursday. I’m guessing that people came to Amoeba to get their Lila fix. To Lila, we wish a speedy recovery and we look forward to her next show at The Hollywood Forever Cemetery on October 24th for the Dia De Los Muertos Festival.

At number six is Natalia Lafourcade's latest, Hu Hu Hu. Released in Mexico in May (and yes, of course, not domestically) this is Natalia’s best release to date. Her songwriting has matured yet still retaines that youthful edge, especially lyrically. Much like Juan Son’s Mermaid Sashimi, Natalia’s release also reveals that she is a recent graduate of The Brian Wilson School of Songwriting, sans Juan Son’s flair for the dramatic. Despite obvious influences, Natalia still marches to the beat of her own drum. I can see a whole new generation of Latin American singer/songwriters using Hu Hu Hu as a template for their future work, much like they did with her past releases.

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August 30, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, August 30, 2009 10:25pm | Post a Comment
The Goods movie ticket stub AMC Burbank 8




I really disliked The Goods. Afterwards I watched Julie & Julia:


America Gets a Post-Racial: The Legacy of Lee Atwater

Posted by Charles Reece, August 30, 2009 10:03am | Post a Comment
The latest issue of The London Review of Books has an excellent essay, "What Matters," by Walter Benn Michaels (author of The Trouble with Diversity). In analyzing the recent arrest of Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, Michaels answers my fellow blogger Eric's question of "who's black?" with another, more telling question: "who's poor?." To wit:

Gates, as one of his Harvard colleagues said, is ‘a famous, wealthy and important black man’, a point Gates himself tried to make to the arresting officer – the way he put it was: ‘You don’t know who you’re messing with.’ But, despite the helpful hint, the cop failed to recognise an essential truth about neoliberal America: it’s no longer enough to kowtow to rich white people; now you have to kowtow to rich black people too.

[...]

In the US, one of the great uses of racism was (and is) to induce poor white people to feel a crucial and entirely specious fellowship with rich white people; one of the great uses of anti-racism is to make poor black people feel a crucial and equally specious fellowship with rich black people. Furthermore, in the form of the celebration of ‘identity’ and ‘ethnic diversity’, it seeks to create a bond between poor black people and rich white ones. So the African-American woman who cleans my office is supposed to feel not so bad about the fact that I make almost ten times as much money as she does because she can be confident that I’m not racist or sexist and that I respect her culture. And she’s also supposed to feel pride because the dean of our college, who makes much more than ten times what she does, is African-American, like her. And since the chancellor of our university, who makes more than 15 times what she does, is not only African-American but a woman too (the fruits of both anti-racism and anti-sexism!), she can feel doubly good about her.

In the words of our first "post-racial" president's speechwriters, it's the economy, stupid (or, rather, the racially stupid economy -- even its staunchest proponents this side of Ayn Rand will tell you that capitalism is amoral). As the harbinger of racial peace through commercial success, a prescient Arsenio Hall managed to signify our current climate through one particular performance that bridged the old racial divide in popular culture, that of the poor black's blues and the poor white's country:

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Solid Gold! Interview with David Lynch

Posted by Charles Reece, August 29, 2009 07:18pm | Post a Comment
My pal Kyle and I had a chance to interview the best living director. Here 'tis:


Stick around for the credits; the Amoeba film crew did a beautiful job making it.

One Last Thing About August ...

Posted by Whitmore, August 29, 2009 02:14pm | Post a Comment

Now that August is basically over, here is my last chance to mention that it’s been National Catfish Month across this great, chowing-down, eater’s paradise of ours. Back in the late 1980s, the month of August was officially designated by mysterious entities as National Catfish Month. Today, seafood consumption in the United States exceeds 4.9 billion pounds annually and more catfish is now produced on a yearly basis in the United States than all other farmed fish combined. Personally, I’ll eat Catfish any way you serve it: blackened, broiled, grilled, poached or pan fried. At one time catfish was regarded as only a Southern staple. Times have changed. Diners nationwide have doubled their waistlines and their per capita consumption of Catfish since 1986, becoming the fourth most popular fish served in the United States.
 
Another thing, ninety-four percent of all Farm-Raised Catfish harvested in this country is from family-owned farms; many of these growers are second or third generation farmers. Today, the farm-raised Catfish industry employs more than 13,000 people and contributes more than $4 billion to the economy of states like Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas and Louisiana.
 
Catfish is also a lean fish and is an excellent source of protein, low in saturated fat and is a moderate source of polyunsaturated (the good) fat and omega-3 fatty acids. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, moderate fish consumption -- one to two meals a week -- may cut the risk of sudden cardiac death in half.
 
Anyway, why am I writing about catfish? Sometimes between art and movies and music you have to eat, and it might as well be something that isn’t absolute crap. Here is a great recipe from The Catfish Institute. So, throw on some good music (personally I’d go more old-school, maybe some Clifton Chenier), open up the right bottle of beer, maybe an Abita Amber, and enjoy some Catfish with a spicy fireworks rub. Bon Appetit!
 
Catfish with Spicy Fireworks Rub
Serves 4, this recipe makes enough spice rub to keep in your pantry and use many more times throughout the grilling season. (Sidenote: You can store the fireworks rub in a dark cupboard, away from heat; it will keep for two to three months.)
 
¼ cup (50 mL) chili powder
¼ cup (50 mL) ground cumin
¼ cup (50 mL) ground coriander
2 tbsp (30 mL) packed brown sugar
1 tbsp (15 mL) salt
1 tbsp (15 mL) red pepper flakes
2 tbsp (30 mL) freshly ground black pepper
4 U.S. Farm-Raised Catfish fillets, 6 to 8 oz (180 to 250 g) each
 
Preheat grill or broiler to high.
 
To make fireworks rub, mix spices in a bowl and spoon into a glass jar with tight-fitting lid.
 
Spray both sides of each catfish fillet lightly with vegetable oil.
 
Sprinkle 1 teaspoon (5 mL) of fireworks rub (or adjust to your taste) on each lightly oiled catfish fillet. Grill or broil over high heat for 3 ½ to 4 minutes per side or until the fish begins to flake when tested with a fork in the thickest part.
 
By the way, here’s some Skip James, “Catfish Blues,” and the great Clifton Chenier.


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