Amoeblog

Sixx's Most Unholy 'Sister Devil'

Posted by Aaron Detroit, January 11, 2010 03:30pm | Post a Comment
Von, Sixx, Sister Devil Art
Recently highlighted in Black Light District’s 2009 year-end lists, Sixx’s Sister Devil is a starkly excellent yet nearly-forgotten Deathrock recording from 1991 by the members of San Francisco cult (and largely considered America’s first) Black Metal band, Von. After the release of their Satanic Blood demo, the members of Von started Sixx as a side project. While decidedly taking a turn towards Deathrock, the group recorded 8 tracks as Sixx that retained the lo-fi bleakness and Satanic bent of Von’s now infamous and highly influential demo recordings. Sister Devil has threads of early Sisters of Mercy, Bauhaus, Samhain, early Xmal Deutschland, and The Cure. The LP likely would have been an immediately celebrated record had it been properly distributed and promoted on its initial release in ’91; however, the band only ever released a handful of cassette demo copies. The album -- now featuring brand-spanking-new mastering by James Plotkin (Khanate/Khlyst) -- was finally and properly issued on CD and LP this past November thanks to Von/ Sixx’s very own Goat and NWN! Productions and though it took 18 years to properly release, it will now likely be rightly considered a Deathrock classic.

Stand-out track “Black Ride” sounds like it could be an early demo for the Sisters’ First Last and Always LP had Andrew Eldritch been more of the goat-sacrificing ilk, while Von, Sixx, Black Metal“On The Dead” is Only Theatre of Pain-era Christian Death meets Peter Murphy on some-sort of pill-popping bender. The lo-fi atmosphere and an almost tentative approach to the songs are complimented and tied together by creepy spoken interludes by frontman Goat (taken from his 1993 zine -- a facsimile of which can be obtained in the special “die-hard” edition of the LP) that sound like ‘found’ recordings of a killer’s last confession.

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(In which Job & Corey celebrate #3.)

Posted by Job O Brother, January 11, 2010 12:38pm | Post a Comment
Reading sentences is weird, isn’t it? Just the way you’re sitting at your computer right now, scanning these lines of organized scribbles and, as a result, you’re hearing these words in your head – words that I typed on my computer sometime in your past.
horse

All of which is pretty intimate, don’t you think? I mean, you’re trusting me enough to allow whatever I decided to write to enter into your consciousness via language, not necessarily knowing what I’m going to type. I mean, what if I wrote this sentence:

We oftentimes remove the hamster’s eyes and replace them with fresh-churned butter, which allows them to see less and makes their faces smell vaguely of movie theatre concession stands.
chicken
First of all, there’s a lot of things about that sentence that're willyish, and what if you’re not in the mood to deal with it? But now you’ve read it and there’s no going back. It’s recorded in your mind forever. Even if you someday forget it (which is almost certainly advisable), it will be catalogued somewhere, there in the delicious depths of your awesome brain.
fancy
Anyway, the boyfriend and I just celebrated our third anniversary yesterday. It was swell! The cat and I allowed him to sleep-in until noon, while we spent time organizing my music library and watching birds be weird.

WORTH A MILLION IN PRIZES: IGGY POP

Posted by Billyjam, January 11, 2010 12:13pm | Post a Comment
Iggy Pop
Some songs just never get old. And Iggy Pop's song "Lust For Life," which I just listened to for the first time in eons, is such a track; one of those timeless tunes that no matter how often I hear it and even though it has been a very popular song, it never fails to grab me. I love it! The song, which is now 33 years old, is defined by Hunt Sales' hypnotic drum intro and Iggy spitting such memorable lyrics as "Coz I'm worth a million in prizes" and "I am just a modern guy/ Of course I've had it in the ear before," with its William S. Burroughs references (Johnny Yen, etc.).

The title track of the second of two Iggy Pop albums released in 1977 by RCA, it was co-written with David Bowie during their prolific Berlin collaborative era. In the first part of '77 the pair collaborated on Iggy's The Idiot, and, following its release, toured together in support of that album. Then, fresh from that short tour, back in Berlin, they jumped into the studio in to make Lust For Life in record time, reportedly writing, recording, and mixing the entire album in a little over a week!

Back when it first came out, Lust For Life was more commercially successful than even Pop's earlier (and highly influential) recordings with The Stooges. And in the years since the initial release of "Lust For Life," the song has taken on a life of its own, continually garnering radio airplay, showing up on countless compilations, and being used in several commercials and soundtracks -- most famously in 1996's Trainspotting, which gave it a new lease on life, introducing it to a new generation of fans. And in the decades since its initial recording, Iggy, who turns 63 this year, continually performs the song in concert, each time with renewed energy and raw power. Below are a number of video clips of Iggy, who never seems to wear a shirt in concert, performing the song. The earliest performance (and best, in my opinion) is the one in Manchester, England in 1977. Also below are the lyrics for "Lust For Life."
 

"Lust For Life" (live, 1977 Manchester, England)

"Lust For Life" (UK TV circa 93/94)


"Lust For Life" (live, mid nineties)

Here comes Johnny Yen again
With the liquor and drugs
And the flesh machine
He's gonna do another striptease
Hey man where'd you get
That lotion? I been hurting
Since I bought the gimmick
About something called love
Yeah something called love
That's like hypnotizing chickens
Well I am just a modern guy
Of course I've had it in the ear before

Knowing is Half the Battle: Knowing (2009)

Posted by Charles Reece, January 10, 2010 09:42am | Post a Comment
 knowing poster

Having a blu-ray player finds me watching some stuff that I wouldn't have otherwise, because there's a limited amount of quality features available to the format (about 20 titles at last count). Alex ProyasKnowing is one such example of techno-fetishism overwhelming my aesthetic expectation. Roger Ebert really liked it, but he was about the only one. As The Crow and Dark City showed, Proyas has something of a singular vision -- although I'm not quite sure what it is, but it probably appeals to James O'Barr's decaying Goth fiefdom back in Detroit. Lots of confusion and brooding, this time with Nicholas Cage. He's an astrophysicist who discovers a code in a string of numbers that his son brings home from school. It was written by a little girl 50 years ago and buried in the elementary school's time capsule. As it turns out, the numbers predicted the time and place of every major and not so major catastrophe over the intervening years since its burial with only a few dates still pending.

Cage lost his wife in an accident and now believes there's no meaningful order to the world (scientists are never allowed to come to a viewpoint through reason, only by emotion in this type of film). As he explains during a lecture, everything's either deterministic or chaotic (ignoring the deterministic equations of Chaos Theory). That's not a very sophisticated metaphysics, but makes it easy to follow the intended message of the movie. According to Cage's physicist, a meaningful existence can only come from a preordained order, in which all events were determined at the outset of creation. He surmised after his wife's death that since it was for no purpose, everything must be random. Thus, discovering a code which predicts all these tragedies helps to restore his faith in the great plan and that there's a meaningful narrative to his life and her death.

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Ride On!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, January 8, 2010 01:50pm | Post a Comment
do you wanna go party kc and the sunshine bandboatz lpnazareth the fool circle

Free fridays at Santa Anita racetrack start today and continue for the next few months. I highly recommend a trip out to Arcadia to sit in the bleachers and smoke, drink and bet-- or you can just pretend to bet like I often do. Of course, there are "exclusive" box seats and all that, but to me the bleachers make for a much better bit of people watching and a much more relaxing time. Dollar beers, dollar hot dogs and a stunning view of the San Gabriel Mountains make the trek out east a worthy one.

pretty things silk torpedoshalamar big funswimming pool q's world war two point five
the band wagopn fred and adele astaireconjunto san benito alegre
DON EVERLY SUNSET TOWERSa first easter record for children
la rondallita el burrito de belen14 Cañonazos Bailables vol. 19the intruders cowboys to girls
rockingbirds gradually learninganatoli belyaev russkaya karuselsecretariat horse of the century lp

Santa Anita Park
285 W Huntington Drive
Arcadia CA 91007

jerry garica run for the rosesantonio aguilar rancheras inolvidablessam & dave hold on, i'm comin'

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