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Paul McCartney's 'Amoeba Gig' Will Be Available For The First Time on July 12

Posted by Amoebite, July 10, 2019 02:51pm | Post a Comment

Paul McCartney at Amoeba Hollywood

If you were lucky enough to be at Amoeba Hollywood on June 27, 2007, you witnessed Beatlemania within our very walls as Sir Paul McCartney performed a surprise live set for the promotional “mini tour” for his album Memory Almost Full. This amazing concert is being released in its entirety for the first time on July 12th!

Although 4 songs were previously on the limited edition Amoeba's Secret EP, Amoeba Gig features all 21 songs from his career-spanning performance. The LPs will also include a bonus track ("Coming Up") from soundcheck. Amoeba Gig is available for pre-order now on CD, 2LP, and indie exclusive clear/amber color double vinyl and will be at our stores on July 12th.

Paul McCartney Amoeba Gig Indie Exclusive Color Vinyl

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Avey Tare of Animal Collective

Posted by Amoebite, July 8, 2019 07:04pm | Post a Comment

Avey Tare - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We were excited to have experimental indie pop artist Avey Tare (aka David Portner) share what he found shopping at Amoeba Hollywood in our latest What's In My Bag? episode. His eclectic selections were anything but pedestrian, as his taste ran the gamut from Nigerian Disco to new age and from avant-garde jazz to minimal techno.

Avey Tare is a solo artist and co-founder of Animal Collective. While in high school in Maryland, he met Josh Dibb (Deakin), Noah Lennox (Panda Bear), and Brian Weitz (Geologist); the friends shared homemade recordings and played in different band formations together. Portner and Weitz both moved to New York City after graduation and when they were joined by Dibb and Lennox, the longtime pals formed Animal Collective. In 2000, Avey Tare and Panda Bear released Spirit They're Gone, Spirit They've Vanished, which was later classified as the first official Animal Collective LP. 2001's Danse Manatee saw Avey Tare, Panda Bear, and Geologist joining forces. The bandmates played together in various groupings, sometimes releasing work as Animal Collective and sometimes releasing work under other monikers but it wasn't until 2004's Sung Tongs that the band really began attracting national attention.

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The San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, 7/18-8/4

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 8, 2019 03:53pm | Post a Comment

The San Francisco Jewish Film Festival

Amoeba is proud to co-present four films at the 39th annual San Francisco Jewish Film Festival (SFJFF), July 18 - August 4 at locations all around the Bay Area. This year, the festival will present more than 65 films and 135 individual screenings, performances, and events in San Francisco, Palo Alto, San Rafael, Oakland, and Albany. To see the full schedule and purchase single tickets or passes, please visit the SFJFF ticketing page HERE!

Amoeba Music will be co-presenting the following films:

Shut Up and Play the Piano
Saturday July 27. 11am. Castro Theatre
Friday August 2. 8:45pm. Piedmont Theatre

Performance provocateur, professional Jewish MC, and classical savant are a few of the phrases used to Chilly Gonzalesdescribe the cult musical phenomenon that is Chilly Gonzales. This Grammy-winning Canadian pianist, composer, and performer has moved effortlessly from smoky jazz and hip-hop clubs to packed orchestra halls for the past two decades. The Montreal-born son of Ashkenazi Hungarian Jews, Gonzales (born Jason Charles Beck), was signed at the age of 23 to Warner Bros. with his alternative rock band Son. After the label dumped him, Gonzales traveled to Berlin where he recorded four rap albums, collaborated with vanguard punk high priestess Peaches, and even ran for president of the city's underground scene despite speaking no German whatsoever. Weary of his own blabbermouth avant garde persona, Gonzales took off for Paris where he made the contemplative masterpiece of Satie-esque keyboard melodies, Solo Piano. Since then Gonzales has continually expanded his repertoire by writing and producing material for Canadian rap superstar Drake and Daft Punk's electronic mega-seller Random Access Memories. First time director Philipp Jedicke's freewheeling doc portrait weaves a mosaic of thoroughly entertaining moments from the artist's career culminating in a chaotic concert, with the Vienna Symphony Orchestra taking on Gonzales in all his sweaty, swaggering, crowd-surfing glory.

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Interview With Cheetah Chrome Of Dead Boys

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 3, 2019 07:59pm | Post a Comment

By Jon Longhi

The Dead Boys are one of the most iconic bands of the punk era. They only put out two albums in the late seventies, but both of them are hallmarks of the genre. Young, Loud, And Snotty is a perfect punk slab of vinyl that includes songs like "Sonic Reducer," which may be one of the five best punk tunes ever written. We Have Come For Your Children is another legendary album with classic anthems like "Third Generation Nation." Their live shows were infamous for their violence and rowdiness, and even featured lead singer Stiv Bators cutting himself up on stage. Guitarist Cheetah Chrome's ferocious leads are like a slashing force of nature. Few groups captured the spirit of the New York punk scene better than the Dead Boys. The owner of CBGB was even their manager for a while. Over the years, the band has re-formed on a number of occasions and their latest incarnation will be playing at Burger Boogaloo on Saturday, July 6th. (More on Burger Boogaloo HERE!)

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I REMEMBER JOHANN JOHANNSSON

Posted by Rick Frystak, July 2, 2019 07:56pm | Post a Comment
 
 
Johann Jóhannsson passed away last year in February, of a street drug overdose mixed with other medication he was taking, at the way-way-too-young age of 48 years old, a HUGE, huge loss to many fans of progressive music, film scores and progressive performance. Many of my friends saw his last show at the Walt Disney Hall here in L.A., and it was phenomenal. He would start each piece by rising from the keyboard / midi rig he was using and putting up a 15’’ reel of audiotape onto a Revox analog tape recorder and begin the piece with a repetitive loop or musical chunk, which would be softly, slowly and gradually picked up on by his traveling chamber ensemble and himself on piano, synths and samples, and fleshed out into a blooming, flourishing journey of sound. Simply spellbinding. And the visual elements, besides the exotic candelabras, would be a black and white film with blotted images, increasing the brooding, dark atmospherics.

Brooding and dark usually describe his sound, his direction favoring minor chords and modes. But then, he’ll go and write the Theory of Everything, with lots of lilting, rosy cues because that’s what the story demanded. But to me, he excelled in the glum, ominous moods that begat his reputation and manifested the darkened concert hall, with the black balloons and smudged visuals. In many ways his music reminds me of a correlation with composers such as Arvo Part or John Tavener, in mixing the sound of music from the middle ages with contemporary minimalism or ‘avant garde’ sounds; whatever the project demanded or his own inspiration dictated won over. The reason is inexplicable to me.
 
His film scores such as Prisoners, The Mercy, Mary Magdalene (shared credit with Hildur Gunadóttir), Arrival, Sicario, Mandy, A User’s Manual and others show Johannsson’s versatility, variety and inspiration, with the use of electronics mixed with symphonic and pop music elements, and his collaborations with closely held associates like Icelandic cellist Hildur Gunadóttir, who may continue on the path Johann was mining. In Arrival, he used pure electronic effects as part of the melodies in some of the cues; very effectively. Hildur's score to the HBO series Chernobyl (download only) is fascinating, a logical extension of Johannsson’s sound, with the horror of what's happened manifested by pure unfettered ambience. Twice nominated for Academy Awards, he hit it and won a Golden Globe award (foreign press) for his score to Theory of Everything, a great film detailing the early life of Stephen Hawking, no less great due to Johann’s work.

His newest solo project of his own music, Orphee, came shortly before his passing, and marked his signing with the legendary Deutsche Grammophon record label. It could be the best example of the variety of sounds that this man wanted to express to his audience. Many hum-able melodies fuse with textural elements to get at what Johannsson’s statements are in his musical expressions.

After Orphee’s release, things immediately started to happen. Almost simultaneously, his new label released a 2-LP, or 2-CD set ‘reimagining’ an older project Englabörn & Variations, in which Johann collaborated with the remixers in recomposing each piece and therefore, really, making an entirely new album, possibly one of his best. His new label has thus put together a 7-CD box set, a monumental, 100-dollar package with some new photos and I-don’t-know-what-else according to Deutsche Grammophon’s horrible website. In September of this year, DGG will release a string quartet, and another box set with unreleased tracks is being readied.

Johann’s music is many things to many people. His own solo records, such as Fordlandia, Orphee, Englabörn and Virðulegu Forsetar take the listener directly into the mindset of the soundtrack composer, yet maintain his own individual sound that brings you back to his soundtrack art. There are quite a few works by Johann that are out of print as well, (or nearly), already. Check those out too!

RECOMMENDED LISTENING BY Johann Johannsson:
Orphee (solo)
The Mercy (soundtrack)
Arrival (soundtrack)
Prisoners (soundtrack)
Miner’s Hymns (solo/soundtrack)
Englabörn & Variations (solo)
Theory Of Everything (soundtrack)
Mandy (soundtrack)
Retrospective Box Set (solo/soundtrack)
End Of Summer (soundtrack, w/DVD)
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