Amoeblog

Dr. John’s Best Albums

Posted by Joe Goldmark, February 11, 2018 06:06pm | Post a Comment



Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Dr. John is the funkiest white dude. Listen to his vocals, relate to the lyrics, enjoy his wonderful piano playing, and dig the arrangements. His bag includes blues and soul music, street parade music, trad jazz, and rock & roll, all played with N’awlinz sensibilities. Any questions? Here’s the four albums that move me the most:

Dr John Gris Gris

Gris-Gris

This is Dr. John’s masterpiece and it still sounds fresh and unique. When this album came out in 1968, it was played on underground rock radio and sounded otherworldly. With tunes like “I Walk On Gilded Splinters,” “Mama Roux," and “Jump Sturdy,” you can see how alien it was from a West Coast perspective. In retrospect, some of the production credit has to go to Harold Battiste, the legendary N.O. horn player and producer.


 

Dr. John's Gumbo
 

Dr. John’s Gumbo

Chuck Prophet: San Francisco Musical Treasure

Posted by Joe Goldmark, October 27, 2015 01:29pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

San Francisco rocker Chuck Prophet cut his musical teeth in the band Green On Red before embarking Chuck Prophet, Night Surferon a solo career in the early 1990s. Since then he’s recorded a dozen of his own unique albums. Although he’s had much critical success, he still flies pretty much under the radar as far as the masses are concerned. Luckily, he’s undeterred, and keeps releasing wonderful albums. He did have some commercial success when he scored a Top 40 hit a few years ago with “Summertime Thing,” a perfect summer anthem from his album No Other Love. His latest album Night Surfer is out now on Yep Roc.

Chuck’s songs are well written and hooky, and his production is clean and interesting. His lyrics are unusual and his “blue-eyed soul” vocals are strong and distinctive. We’re fortunate to have him in the local scene when he’s not touring the world. A shout out to Stephanie Finch, Chuck’s wife, who’s been a mainstay in the band on organ and vocals.
 

"Summertime Thing" – From No Other Love


"Just To See You Smile" – From The Age Of Miracles


"No Other Love" – From No Other Love


"Wish Me Luck" – From Night Surfer


"Ford Econoline" – From Night Surfer


"Summertime Thing" - live with Daryl Hall & Mutlu plus intros from Daryl’s Place

The Rocking Freddie King

Posted by Joe Goldmark, September 15, 2015 06:30pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

You didn’t have to be named King to be a blues master…but it helped! The three kings of the blues were Freddie King, Bossa Nova BluesAlbert, B.B., and Freddie King. They were all great, but Freddie King rocked the hardest. He was also the only one to have instrumental hits. And, like the others he could also sing the heck out of the blues.

Freddie roughly had two stages to his career. While with King Records (of Freddie King, Let's Hide Awaycourse!) he started having instrumental hits in the early 1960s. Tunes like “Hideaway,” “The Stumble,” “San-Ho-Zay,” “Sen-Sa-Shun,” and “Side Tracked” put him on the map as a major guitar slinger. Then in 1967 he signed with the Atlantic subsidiary, Cotillion Records, and was able to break out of the chitlin’ circuit and into the rock world. He made a couple of interesting albums, then got his major break by signing with Shelter Records. He then made three wonderful albums, taking the blues to new and exciting places with tunes such as “Going Down,” “Palace of the King,” and “Livin’ on the Highway.”

Unfortunately, Freddie died at the young age of 42, in the prime of his career. However, he left us with some great recordings.

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Mitty Collier - Unheralded Soul #3

Posted by Joe Goldmark, July 22, 2015 07:32pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Mitty Collier Mitty Collier

Mitty Collier came from the church, had a soul career for 10 years, and went back to the church to stay in 1972. She had the deepest, sexiest voice in soul music, but she still flew under the radar. Although she had many R&B hits, she was just too gritty for Top 40 radio. Mitty’s early career was with Chess Records in Chicago, but her best work was produced by Stax soul legend William Bell for the Peachtree label in Atlanta.  

I’d Like To Change Places – (Entrance)



Share What You Got – (Peachtree)



Lovin’ On Borrowed Time – (Peachtree)



You Hurt So Good – (Peachtree)



Everybody Makes A Mistake Sometimes – (Chess)



I Had A Talk With My Man – (Chess)



That’ll Be Good Enough For Me – (Chess)



I Gotta Get Away From It All – (Chess)


 

Mystery Girl: The Most Romantic Rock Record?

Posted by Joe Goldmark, May 13, 2015 05:59pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

IMO, Mystery Girl by Roy Orbison is the most romantic rock album ever. I pitched this theory to Diane, my wife, right after “A Love So Beautiful” had played and she had a different take on it. She said, maybe not romantic, but certainly passionate. Her rational was that the song’s relationship doesn’t work out. Semantics aside, we agreed that Jeff Lynne’s gorgeous production coupled with Roy’s amazingly tortured vocals make this album a heart-grabber.

Lynne was at the height of his powers with recent productions for The Traveling Wilburys, George Harrison, and his own brilliant Armchair Theatre. He succeeds at producing luscious rock music without being overly schmaltzy. We all know Roy Orbison’s early ‘60s rock operettas, which were rivaled only by Phil Spector’s paeans in their angst-filled grandeur. However, some folks haven’t heard his later work with The Traveling Wilburys and this album, Mystery Girl. Unfortunately, Roy Orbison died right before the album was released.

Here’s what Wikipedia says about the album:

Mystery Girl is the last album recorded by Roy Orbison, posthumously released on the Virgin label in 1989. The album became a hit worldwide, reaching #5 on the US Billboard 200, and #2 on the UK Albums Chart. All the tracks were recorded in late 1988, and it was finalized for release in the weeks following Orbison's death through the collaborative efforts of several artists who were all friends and admirers. The album was named after the chorus from the track "She's a Mystery to Me," written for Orbison by U2's Bono and The Edge.

This is the tour de force:
 

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