Amoeblog

Film Noir Festival Returns To The Egyptian Theatre

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 31, 2010 11:15am | Post a Comment
April is just about the finest month of the year to be in Los Angeles. The weather usually remains mild with sunny days & cool nights. Rainy days and scattered showers still pop up and I tend to appreciate them much more than winter storms, as I can smell the impending triple digit heatwaves that are right around the corner. Daylight savings time has brought an extra hour to get things done, the smell of jasmine is in the air and new year resolutions have been broken so there's more room at the gym. But all of this pales in comparison to the real reason why April is so special in LA...



Oh yes, the film noir festival returns to the spectacular Egyptian Theatre for the 12th year in a row. Yes, I'll tolerate all that Hollywood Blvd. has become for this series of showings -- suburban crowds seeking companionship and/or a fight down at da clubs, the $20 parking spaces, the bluetoothed security goons shoulder checking pedestrians. I'll deal because there's always a couple of gems in the mix at this festival to make all these hassles worth while. Highlights of  the first week include William Castle & George Raft doubles, live appearances by Julie Adams & Rhonda Fleming and a brand new print of the classic Cry Danger
Egyptian Theatre

6712 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, CA
(between Las Palmas& McCadden)
(323) 466-3456

$11/$7 for members
all showings start at 7:30

Friday April 2nd- Cry Danger / Tight Spot
Saturday April 3rd- Red Light / Johnny Angel
Sunday April 4th- Hollywood Story / Undertow
Wednesday April 7th- Julie / Blueprint For Murder
Thurs April 8th- So Evil My Love / Experiment Perilous

Thom Yorke's Atoms For Peace Anticipated Nine Date US Tour Culminates At Coachella

Posted by Billyjam, March 31, 2010 10:20am | Post a Comment
"Harrowdown Hill" by Thom Yorke + (then unnamed) Atoms For Peace @ LA's Echoplex in October

When the current lineup for Radiohead front man Thom Yorke's "other band" first played last October at LA's Echoplex they didn't have an official name. People then were referring to them as "Thom Yorke and Friends" or as the "Thom Yorke and Flea side project" band. In fact, when the lineup for this year's Coachella Festival (April 16, 17, 18 in Indio CA) at which they are one of the main attractions on the Thom Yorkeclosing day, was initially announced, they were simply billed under the name ????.  Consisting of Yorke, Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea, producer Nigel Godrich on keyboards, and session percussionists Joey
Waronker
and Mauro Refosco, the group, under Yorke's orchestration, has settled on the band name Atoms For Peace. However the Coachella website currently lists the band simply as "Thom Yorke," no doubt for easier recognition & less confusion.


Thom Yorke "Atoms For Peace" (2006)


Continue reading...

The Beauty of LP Cover Art, Bob Dylan's Influential Film Clip, Reid Miles' Blue Note Cover Art, The 50 Worst Album Covers + More

Posted by Billyjam, March 29, 2010 01:37pm | Post a Comment

While recently checking out the video below by the Audio Bullys (the UK duo whose third album Higher Than The Eiffel arrives in Amoeba tomorrow) for their great 2008 single-only release "Gimme That Punk" in which they display countless classic album covers (including The Clash, The Doors, The Kinks, The Sex Pistols Jamie ReidSex Pistols) it further reminded me of why I love (and miss) LPs and their glorious 12" by 12" cover art work so much. This is why I always look forward to checking out new (and always themed) LP cover art posts here by The Gone World Amoeblogger Mr Chadwick and any record or LP cover art gallery shows like the ones at very top and lower points of this blog, courtesy of Siemon Allen Records, whose current exhibit Records (South African Edition) just ended yesterday at the Johannesburg Art Fair. 

The Audio Bullys' video reminded me of another UK musical duo's video from recent years, dan le sac VS scroobius pip's 2007 video for their hit single "Thou Shalt always Kill," in which they also flip through various classic album covers as they dismiss their respective makers as being "just a band." This music video style, utilized by both this pair and the Audio Bullys, of displaying and then tossing on the ground the LP covers that are referenced in their lyrics is directly derived from the film footage of Bob Dylan's Bringing It All Back Home album track "Subterranean Homesick Blues" in which Dylan is filmed tossing large cue cards with key words from the song's lyrics.

Continue reading...

19 Days 'Till Coachella Go Boom

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 28, 2010 11:20pm | Post a Comment

Coachella
, Coachella, Coachella. Figure if I say it enough times it’ll eventually get old but it never does. Every year it comes around the same time and every year I get equally as excited, like I'm some sort of frat boy exploring his inaugurate freedom. The thought of a mini vacay alone sounds appeasing to me; it's high time for celebration. Take that, social eruption and enough music to runneth my cup a gazillion times over, and I’m there. I’d clone myself if I could to double my pleasure, that’s just how I feel about it. We're skimming the surface here -- we haven’t even gotten to the line-up yet; the line-up this year is the cherry on top. Wanna talk goodness: It could be just another plain dusty ol’ donut or it could be a sumptuous, glistening glazed donut, but it’s still a donut, still edible, still sweet. This year it’s a mammoth jelly filled, chocolate glazed donut with sprinkles and powdered sugar on top. I’m geeked, your mom’s geeked, everybody’s geeked, it's one big geek feast. Yaaa for Coachella's line-up 2010! Bummer side note: I might not be going... don't wish to bore you with the details really, will just say 'keep you posted for now'. Ah, pooh.
 
None the matter, I'm still just stuck on stupid over the cast of characters this year. Since the beginning of the year I’ve been on this new kick: “new beginnings, first times,” taking the leap into the unknown whenever I feel so inclined. So far it's working out nicely for me, took my first trip to Thailand (awesome), twisted my thumb for the first time while trying to ride a motorbike for the first time, got my arm pits waxed for the first time (never again) and I also dyed my hair for the first time—since high school—but the color didn’t hold, so you can’t tell, no one notices. Cut the mumbo jumbo and you get whatever goes, that’s my plan for Coachella: whatever goes—if I go. No game plan, just roaming fields. Too many good acts; Gil Scott Heron could be playing in one tent, Grace Jones could be performing in the next tent, then pop one tent over to catch the end of 2 Many DJ’s set and then and then and then... Just putting it on destination: cruise control. I’ll spare you the farcical dissertation on the art of music and cut straight to my short list…Part 1:

King Khan and The Shrines – so many delectable things all in one; their 2009 album release What Is?! further proves their truly unique patter and equally unique performance caper defies categorization. Performing Sunday, April 18th. Check the antics:


Also check this video of King Khan and The Shrines performing at Amoeba Hollywood.


Mayer Hawthorne and The County
– ‘blue eyed soul’ more Stones Throw goodies. His debut album A Strange Arrangement will soon be synonymous with “greatest albums of …” lists. Performing Sunday, April 18th.


Yeasayer
– Their Sophomore album Oddblood sounds like dazzling electro/pop from New York; it’s probably the best album—in its entirety—out this year…so far, trust me. Sounds nothing like: MGMT. Performing Friday, April 16th.  To follow is an extraordinary expenditure of song and video. Dance if you know what’s good for ya.


Z-Trip
– Disc jockey zeitgeist. Performing Saturday, April 17th. Fab Five Freddy had to pick his jaw up off the floor and mop up a pile of drool after watching his set, which speaks volumes. Don’t believe the hype? Watch for yourself...


That’s it for now, folks! Stay tuned for the extended list. Till next time chew the corners off.



Four Latin Rock Releases For March 2010

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 28, 2010 10:54pm | Post a Comment

Julieta Venegas
-Otra Cosa

For someone as hugely popular as Julieta Venegas is, I find it takes her fans a good couple of weeks to discover that she has a new album out. The album artwork and the first video look like they came from the British Psychedelic Folk movement of the late sixties. No worries though, Julieta remains on Planet Julieta and there is no one who can do it better than her. So women and Indie-nerd boys rejoice, the new album is here!

Julieta Venegas - "Buen o Mal"





Bunbury
- Las Consecuencias

The former (and maybe still current) member of Heroes Del Silencio latest’s album is somewhat of a departure from the 2006’s guitar driven Hellville En Deluxe, which only available as an import in the U.S. The song “Frente A Frente” is a cover song of Spanish singer Jeanette, done slightly darker. What is cool about this song is that it includes the vocals of Miren Iza from the group,Tulsa. Her vocals mixed with Enrique Bunbury's give the song a Serge Gainsberg/Jane Birkin feel.

Bunbury - "Frente A Frente"




Jorge Drexler
-Amar La Trama

My all-time favorite Oscar moment is when Uraguyan legend Jorge Drexler won the Oscar for Best Song in 2004 for the song, "Al Otro Lado Del Río" from The Motorcycle Diaries. The unknown Drexler was not allowed to perform his own song; rather, Antonio Banderas and Carlos Santana performed a rather gaudy version of the song. I remember thinking at the time, if they could let an relativity unknown (at the time) Elliott Smith perform "Miss Misery" back in 1998, then why not Drexler? When Drexler won, his acceptance speech was him singing the song acapella. It was probably the nicest fuck you Hollywood ever got.

Jorge Drexler - "Tres Mil Millones De Latidos"




Maldita Vecindad
-Circular Colectivo

It’s hard to believe this is Maldita’s first CD in twelve years. I think I have seen them at least once a year since then. They are one of the best live bands that I have seen. The last time I saw them they tore it up opening for Alejandra Guzman. Aterciopelados and Calle 13 also played that show. I would have hated to be Guzman that night! I can see their blend of Ska, Rock, Highlife and Middle Eastern music not being for everyone, especially those who do not understand the lyrics. I have to admit -- the first time I heard them I wasn’t impressed until I saw them live. Circular Colectivo is their most cohesive release since Circo, which of course, is their classic.

Maldita Vecindad - "Y Asi Seguir"

SOUNDTRACK SERIES #4

Posted by Job O Brother, March 28, 2010 04:44pm | Post a Comment
Directions: Imagine Mr. Brother living another day, as always, with music playing. Whether it’s one of his trusty iPods, or his home stereo, or working the soundtracks section of Amoeba Music Hollywood, Mr. Brother is eating, sonically, with the mouths of his ears.

To simulate this experience, as you read the below story of a day lived, you will be given certain music clips to play. These are inserted to provide you with the same tunes Job was hearing as he was doing what you’ll be reading.

For example, while he was writing the above directions, he was listening to this:


The other day… no, not that day – the other day… yeah, that one… I was painting my collection of pigments, when a car drove past, blaring its music so loud that it felt like an earthquake. But, y’know, an earthquake that could keep a beat.


I’m all for losing one’s self in music, but I do think it’s tacky to blast your car stereo so loud that anyone within an area code can hear it. I’m not talking about regular loud – I’m talking about these people who have pimped out their auto’s sound system specifically so that they can impose their roving, one-man rave on a neighborhood at a time. What if someone’s trying to sleep? What if someone’s trying to record music? What if someone’s being held hostage by a crazy person who’s got a sword pressed to their throat and is screaming:

Perennial Melodies: Sukiyaki for the Sentimental

Posted by Kells, March 28, 2010 02:39pm | Post a Comment
A few weeks ago the vocalist Eduard Khil and his heart-swelling vocal flexes were nothing to me, but now I cannot think of a day gone by without my acknowledging the impression his song has left on my heart. For those who've yet to encounter Khil, his claim to international stardom comes of the internet meme known as "Trololololololololololo," a video clip circa 1976 that features a dapper dandy (Khil) vocalizing a song called "I Am Glad To Be Finally Returning Home" with plenty of laughing ha-hahs and hearty bellowing tro-lo-los as he gestures with casual fluidity, occasionally directing viewers to consider the paltriness of the set pieces that flank him. It is an aural and visual happy-pill dressed in sunny yellow, an upper to be taken when the spirit lags and, for about the last two weeks, it's been the very first thing I enjoy in the morning. 


As if the simple joy and outdated charm of that performance alone wasn't enough to make me fall head over feet for Eduard Khil, he has since been featured in another recent post, a Russian press interview, showing Khil sitting down to view his viral video along with several parodies of it added into the mix (including one starring recent Academy Award recipient Christoph Waltz as seen on Jimmy Kimmel Live!). Khil's delightful reactions to these parodies and subsequent video statement in which he addresses the people of the world to invent lyrics to the much beloved song (which, according to Khil, originally flaunted rather raunchy lyrics --- so naughty in fact that they were never published, but decidedly ditched the for trololo vocalization in hopes that the song stood a chance at being appreciated but for its melody). He then suggests that everyone choose a time to gather and synchronize (via the internet ) to sing their version of the song all together, in their own tongue, in the style of "We Are The World." Okay, so he doesn't mention "We Are The World," but of course he doesn't have to, the sentiment is there, especially as, according to Khil, the song is about returning home and, in his mind, the newfound popularity of his tune represents an eternal homecoming of sorts, and a happy one at that. Bravo Eduard Khil and Спасибо.

Digesting Khil's suggestion that the world set out to celebrate our affection for a singular melody, his melody, by independently crafting original lyrics to accompany a borrowed tune recalled to mind a sweet, bewitching song that I first heard many years ago in an elementary level Japanese class: Sakamoto Kyu's (坂本 九) sentimental hit "Ue wo Muite Arukou" or "I Walk With My Head Held High." Though introduced as a classroom exercise, I became one of many folks in that class who couldn't shake the lovely melancholy of such a tune, even if we couldn't understand everything Sakamoto-san crooned. Like the Russian "homecoming" song, the sentiment of acute longing and heartache expressed in Sakamoto's song, regardless of the presence of meaningful lyrics (and the potential inability to make sense of them), is clearly understood simply because of its perfectly crafted, jaunty-yet-melancholy melody. In fact, this song topped the U.S. Billboard charts for three weeks in 1963 under the title "Sukiyaki" (renamed because the execs at Capitol and HMV thought the original title too difficult to pronounce and/or remember). To date, Sakamoto Kyu's hit single has been the only song sung entirely in Japanese to ever top the charts in the states and it is the only Japanese song to ever enter the U.K. Billboard charts. Indeed, it must be all about that [sigh] sentimental melody. 

And it's that melody that has been, for better or worse, shanghaied halfway 'round the world, the old fashioned way (that is, without knowledge of its being taken until it "arrives"), as a borrowed tune dressed in several languages, most notably as the sentimental slow jam "Sukiyaki" performed in 1981 by A Taste of Honey, the disco ensemble famous for crafting the hit dance single "Boogie Oogie Oogie." All I have to say is thank heavens they resisted suggestions to turn Sakamoto's tune into a disco jam, instead opting for turning it out as a soft-focused ballad which probably has everything to do with the song becoming Honey's final number one single of their career. Unlike Eduard Khil, however, Kyu Sakamoto cared not for the Misses Honey's take on his wistful walk-a-long hit and reportedly sued Capital Records for copyright infringement, a litigious action that pantsed those who had thought the song fruit of the public domain tree, ripe for the taking, and so plucked the tune and inanely kept the altered name "Sukiyaki."

By the way, sukiyaki (a Japanese steam-pot dish) has next to nothing to do with the original lyrics of Sakamoto's song or the romantic interpretation laid down by Honey's Janice Marie Johnson, who found that English translations of "Ue wo Muite Arukou" could be viewed three ways: as a man on his way to his execution, as someone trying to be optimistic despite life's trials, or as the story of an ended love affair (of course she opted to paint the English lyrics in the waning light of a love gone bad). My favorite quote related to the ridiculousness of naming a song for a word that is short, catchy, recognizably Japanese and familiar to English speakers comes from a Newsweek columnist who reportedly likened naming Sakamoto's song "Sukiyaki" to issuing a popular tune like "Moon River" in Japan under the title "Beef Stew," a total wah-waah.

Of course there have been other takes on the popular tune, mostly covers of A Taste of Honey's "Sukiyaki" rather than further takes on Kyu Sakamoto's crooning hit, but there's certainly nothing like the real thing. Featured below are several videos, the first being a 1963 video of Sakamoto himself walking and singing "Ue wo Muite Arukou" with his head held high ("so the tears down fall from my eyes" according to the original Japanese lyrics) followed by a live performance of "Sukiyaki" by A Taste of Honey complete with the aforementioned Johnson and bandmate Hazel Payne clad in kimonos, koto accompanyment on the song, finished with a whispered "sayonara" at the end. Then we have a 1995 version of "Sukiyaki" delivered by American R&B ensemble 4 P.M. (p.s. did they gank that set from that Heavy D & the Boys video for "Now That We Found Love" or what) and then a live version of "Sukiyaki" en Español as performed by Selena on the Johnny Canales Show.










As if that wasn't enough sentimental gumbo or stew or whatever Westerners are reducing culturally enriched stock to these days, I have to address here the ultimate slice of flimsy-whimsy courtesy of the what-were-they-thinking school of sentimental panty-plaint, under-the-influence love jams: Bob Welch's "Sentimental Lady." Though the song cannot claim any worldliness or global catchiness the likes of which "Sukiyaki" can boast of, the unfathomable sappiness of the composition as a whole gives me cause to lump it in with this exploration of catchy, sentimental melodies, even if it plays the vapid fool of the group. I mean, what the heck does he mean by "fourteen joys and a will to be merry" in terms of the "sentimental, gentle wind" he sings of "blowing through" his life again? The fact that this song was originally recorded for Fleetwood Mac's 1972 album Bare Trees and then re-recorded for Welch's 1977 solo album French Kiss boggles my mind entirely, but don't get me wrong --- I love this song, if not but for its sheer docile naïvité. However, this subject might be better saved for delving in an entirely different post altogether. Enjoy!

March 26, 2010

Posted by phil blankenship, March 28, 2010 01:46pm | Post a Comment

Check Out Performances and Interviews from 2010 Coachella Artists at Amoeba! Part 1

Posted by Amoebite, March 27, 2010 04:05pm | Post a Comment

Many of the artists performing at Coachella 2010 have performed live and/or shopped at Amoeba, including John Waters, Dave Grohl, Boots Riley, Aterciopelados, Sia, Vampire Weekend and more!

Check out their instore performance videos, interviews, and What's In My Bag? features right here in Part 1, and get a little insight into these artists' inspirations, what they listen to, and their music! To see Part 2, with Steve Malkmus of Pavement, Zoe, The Soft Pack and more, go here!


Dave Grohl of Them Crooked Vultures - What's In My Bag?




John Waters - Interview



Boots Riley of Street Sweeper Social Club - What's In My Bag?

Check Out Performances and Interviews from 2010 Coachella Artists at Amoeba! Part 2

Posted by Amoebite, March 27, 2010 04:05pm | Post a Comment
Here we have part 2 in a series, with even more artists performing at Coachella this year who have stopped by Amoeba and performed, been interviewed or taken part in one of our What's in My Bag features! To see Part 1, with Boots Riley, Dave Grohl, Sia, Vampire Weekend, Girls and more, go here!

Sune Rose Wagner of The Ravonettes - What's In My Bag?




Zoe - Performance Video




Zoe - Interview



Top Hats

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 27, 2010 02:50pm | Post a Comment

Electronic New Releases 03/26/2010 - Massive Attack, Pantha Du Prince, Seth Troxler, Martyn & more...

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, March 26, 2010 12:36pm | Post a Comment


Massive Attack

Heligoland
Virgin

Massive Attack's fifth studio album finally arrives, a full seven years after its predecessor. Clusters of gloomy chords, dubby basslines, and ominous breakbeats scattered across the album suggest that they haven't lifted their musical mood. Martina Topley-Bird's contributions scale the heights of astonishment Massive Attack has achieved with previous female collaborators. Set against a panoply of disjointed acidic bleeps and slippery electronic beats, it's taken into an entirely new emotional realm. The theme: sounds haunt to the point of terror. Some of the top tracks include "Pray For Rain," "Girl I Love You," and "Paradise Circus." All in all, a brilliant album.




Pantha Du Prince

Black Noise
Rough Trade

Firmly rooted in classic techno and house music, yet also appealing to a much wider audience (as also evident by their move to Rough Trade), Pantha Du Prince's album Black Noise is his stellar new release, elevating him to a status occupied by the likes of Ricardo Villalobos, The Field, and Isolee. A delicately nuanced album with romantic compositions, and dark panoramic splendour, maintaining a sense of minimalism amidst its textural, hypnotic feel. Whether its tribal (primal and child-like) rhythms, and trance-not-trance psychedelia, Pantha Du Prince is amongst the new breed (spearheaded by artists like Animal Collective) of highly accessible yet cerebral artists whose music flows from headphones like colors bleed from rainbows. Featuring Panda Bear from Animal Collective and Tyler Pope from LCD Soundsystem.


Pawel

s/t
Dial

With Pantha Du Princes’ departure to Rough Trade, Pawel can easily claim to having released Dials' most innovative minimal album, if not topping the general list-so-far. Subtle dancefloor grooves are anchored by a melancholy ear and melodies that are clean and sparse. Classic techno synthlines, wispy electronics, and an occasional wordly feel.








Stefan Goldmann

Haven't I Seen You Before
(cassette only release!)
Tapeworm

Stefan Goldmann is the latest guest on the Tapeworm's cassette only label (previous cast has included Philip Jeck, Biosphere, and Stephen O'Malley from Sunn O)))). Goldmann's guitar is the only sound source here, cut into loops of various durations, overlapped and sequenced. In proof that tapes are not merely cool ornaments or glamorized for the sake of nostalgia, Goldmann utilizes the full and unique potential of the format, such as encouraging the listener to use their auto-reverse function to flip between alternate versions of the take. Creative and fun!





Martyn

Fabric 50
Fabric

"I did the whole mix CD live just because I thought that was more honest than doing an Ableton DJ mix. It is how I would play live – not everything on the CD is perfect, but it’s not meant to be. That goes for my DJ sets and for my music as well" - Martyn
Martyn's meteoric rise to the vanguard of all things deep, techy, funky and steppin' is entirely warranted by a series of deadly productions that surely need no introduction here. The Dutchman's DJ sets over the last 12 months have increasingly looked beyond dubstep's peripheries to the fields of synthfunk, hiphop, housed-up ruffage and broken beat electronics, as well as deep-dub aquatics: scanning the oncoming waves of percussively rooted dance music to cherry pick the very tastiest chunks of goodness. For Fabric 50 he's assorted one of the most enviable trackists around, Madd Slinky, Ben Klock, Levon Vincent and Joy Orbison to keep the curve on a brilliantly varied but controlled trajectory for the floor. It's probably going to be another six months before half of these tracks reach the shop floor, and the other other half are simply stone cold essential, so there's very little doubt as to what you gotta do here. Immense.



Thisisnotanexit

Manifesto #1
Thisisnotanexit

Thisisnotanexit has unobtrusively been carving a niche for themselves as purveyors of frequently brilliant music sharing a singular aesthetic (a kind of Balearic open-mindedness combined with a love of fearless sonic adventures... and well, post punk) that, by accident or design, has positioned the new label as a kind of fantastic covert operation waiting to be discovered. Primarily dealing in disco-post-electronic odysseys, Manifesto #1 is a compilation, but, more than that, it's a statement of intent, a list of instructions and a dossier of clues to a secret society (in the best spirit of Factory Records). So here we have it, experimental post-rave ambiance (Brain Machine, Professor Genius) alongside Eno-esque throbbing beatless minimalism (Naum Gabo, Spectral Empire), and dreamy takes on kosmiche nu-disco. One word though, describes all: Progressive.


Hot Chip

One Night Stand
Parlophone

Poised for ridiculous levels of commercial success, Hot Chip arrive at their third album, having thus far enjoyed a surprisingly huge audience and a generous critical response. At various points One Night Stand sees a more determined approach to mainstream pop music. Well, enough shameless pop to put M-People to shame, actually. Plastic sounds and orchestrally embellished electro-soul define the new super rave. Love it or hate it.








Fluxion

Perfused For Greek stalwart
Echocord

Fluxion's second album is an affirmation that he's among the elite in making killer ice-cool techno -- a great piece for the dub techno heads to add to their collections. Perfused sounds like it could have came out on Chain Reaction over ten years ago. A GOOD thing!








Ellen Allien

Watergate 05
Watergate

Ellen Allien steps up for the next installment of the Watergate series, and bonus points for popping out a real time concoction! It's nice to hear a mix with rough edges contrast to Ableton perfection. Allien's sixth (!) mixtape is lively, a florid mix with edgy electro, feathery percussion, and what makes her awesome -- her playing-in-the-dark moody flirtations. Featuring Matias Aguayo, John Tejada, Fever Ray, Uffie, and AGF.







Seth Troxler

Boogybytes Vol.5
B-Pitch

Another Detroit expat has been spotted in Berlin... and found collaborating with techno's first lady Ellen Allien. With successful joints on B-Pitch and high profile remixes in tow (Fever Ray and Hearththrob) Seth Troxler drops a mix boasting those collabed re-edits and peers in the world of funky minimal, such as Roman Flugel and Alexi Delano.








Quadron

s/t
Plug Research

Plug Research dives into the pond of electronic soul music and casts out Danish pop-wise r'n'b duo Quadron for a debut album of boogie-idm-funk synth-pop symphonics, fronted by cute femme vocals. If you like Mayer Hawthorne, Shafiq Husayn or maybe even Sa-Ra, do check this jam out!









Goldfrapp

Head First
Mute

The thinking man's electro diva has brushed aside the more aggressive retro laser-beam electro but still couldn't be further than her debut Felt Mountain. Alison Goldfrapp has again reinvented herself, though within a bubbly New Coke n Pop Rocks paradigm of the 80s... and some artsy Italo disco. This is great stuff that could give Lady Gaga a run for her money (let me say again, Alison being the thinking man's diva!) with these nimble pop-perfect arrangements. Goldfrapp Is It!






Autechre

Oversteps
Warp

Oversteps marks the tenth record from the Brits, and a reversion to the more traditional Ae method of dense and intricate studio work. This may sound horrible to some, but this album is probably Autechre's most approachable to date, with its satisfyingly warped wind-up melodies, beautifully discordant acid lines, fascinating oblique abstractions in sound structure, and its sheer baroque beauty overall. Beauty and harmony in complexity and a milestone for Autechre's very human achievement.

Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up: 03:26:10 Chart, Concerts, New Music Picks +

Posted by Billyjam, March 26, 2010 07:00am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 03:26:10

Black Eyed Peas
1) Black Eyed Peas The E.N.D. (Energy Never Dies) (Interscope)

2) Souls Of Mischief Montezuma's Revenge (Clear Label Records)

3) Slum Village Fan-Tas-Tic, Vol. 1 (Barak Records)

4) Ludacris Battle Of The Sexes (DTP Recordings/Def Jam)

5) Wu Tang Clan Wu-Tang Meet the Indie Culture, Vol. 2 (Enter The Dub Step)
(Ihiphop Distribution) 

Somehow the phenomenally popular Black Eyed Peas' (BEP) current singles-driven album The E.N.D. (Energy Never Dies) on Interscope continues to sell well everywhere, including at Amoeba Berkeley where it returns to the number one slot (based on sales) a full nine and a half months after its initial release date. The album's continual slew of hit singles of course helps the BEP stay on top, combined with such other factors as their successful ongoing world tour which arrives in California next week with two shows in LA at the Staples Center (March 29 & 30) and one show in San Jose at the HP Pavilion next Friday (April 2nd). On April 3rd they play San Diego's Sports Arena and on April 7th they play ARCO Arena in Sacramento, Additionally, on Tuesday of next week the group's tour movie The Black Eyed Peas: The E.N.D. World Tour arrives in movie theaters on 500 screens. No doubt this will only Mike Slottfurther fuel their popularity. For more BEP tour and event info click here.
 
Inti, who supplied this week's Amoeba Music Berkeley hip-hop chart, reports that a lot of older hip-hop albums never seem to go out of style with customers and that Pete Rock & CL Smooth's 1992 album Mecca And The Soul Brother is one of those classic hip-hop albums that people continue to buy as if it was a new release. As for Inti's favorite recent releases? He says he is feeling a lot of the instrumental hip-hop coming out lately including Mike Slott's Lucky 9teen that was released on the LuckyMe label three months ago.

Continue reading...

New Beverly: Peter Weller, Harry Dean Stanton & Dean Cameron IN PERSON, Z & The Battle of Algiers, Rare Alan Rudolph, Reservoir Dogs & more!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 25, 2010 08:33pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our April calendar is now online!
www.newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm



Friday & Saturday March 26 & 27

Z
1969, France / Algeria, 127 minutes
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065234/
dir. Costa-Gavras, starring Yves Montand, Irene Papas, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Jacques Perrin
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 2:25 & 7:15

Academy Award Winner Best Foreign Language Film & Best Editing plus nominated for 3 other Oscars including Best Picture & Best Director

4 Stars - "Z" is at the same time a political cry of rage and a brilliant suspense thriller. - Roger Ebert

Endless Rain LP

Posted by Amoebite, March 25, 2010 04:11pm | Post a Comment
Drop LP

My wife insists on using a sound machine to cover up the noise of my snoring, but its awful 30 second disjointed loops drive me absolutely batty. I'm hoping that this locked-groove Japanese LP I found online might make us both happy.

LP Cover rain-side
1. rain sound 10'00. 00'01''8loop

drop-side
1. drop sound a 00'01''8loop
2. drop sound b 00'01''8loop
3. drop sound c 00'01''8loop
4. drop sound d 00'01''8loop
5. drop sound e 00'01''8loop

BUY IT online from designboom.

Tommy Guerrero, Marc Capelle & Griff Williams' San Francisco Benefit Focuses On Importance Of School Music Programs

Posted by Billyjam, March 25, 2010 09:16am | Post a Comment

The benefits of school music programs are far reaching and life spanning. Beyond simply learning how to play a piano or a violin or a guitar, etc., young students of music also gain important life lessons. School music programs directly help shape character and individual abilities, as well as offer a way to help channel ideas and ideals throughout ones life. Hence, it is disheartening when, especially in these harsh economic times, the budgets for school music programs as well as other areas of the arts are typically the first to get slashed.

It was with this in mind that the three concerned individuals behind this week's fun & eclectic Soul Food No. 2 benefit for San Francisco music programs pooled their creative resources. Skateboarder and musician Tommy Guerrero, musician Marc Capelle, and artist & Gallery 16 owner/operator Griff Williams -- all vocal supporters of music in school programs -- are throwing the second in the Soul Food series of benefit shows "that present film and music together in a gallery setting to raise funds for local charities that have an obvious, honest, effective, and immediate impact on our neighborhoods," according to Williams. Following the success of their last Soul Food benefit (for the San Francisco Food Bank) they decided this time work to help support MuST (Music In Schools Today), geared to get musical instruments into SF area schools. Longtime SF artist Tommy Guererro, himself a former SF school district student, is most passionate about the need for school music programs and for their continuation. "Music is the only language that everyone understands: the great communicator," he told me when asked what he saw as the main benefits of school music programs. "Oh, and jocks don't hang out in music class...less beatings that way," he added with a laugh.

March 24, 2010

Posted by phil blankenship, March 24, 2010 08:37pm | Post a Comment



Hip-Hop History: 1991 Rap Radio, When Ice Cube, Main Source, LL Cool J, Gang Starr & Digital Underground Ruled Hip-Hop's Airwaves

Posted by Billyjam, March 23, 2010 10:59pm | Post a Comment

Back in early 1991, as witnessed by the various top ten hip-hop radio charts below from that period, the popular hip-hop of the day was a pretty darn diverse selection of the genre, especially in comparison to what counts for popular hip-hop today. Although the period technically fell under hip-hop's so-called "golden age," as typified by such chart entries below as Gang Starr, A Tribe Called Quest and Main Source, there were many other specific rap flavors also represented. These many different styles sharing the spotlight back then included feminist rap (Yo-Yo's "Dope Femininity" -- the B-Side of "Stompin To The 90s" -- is on the charts as well as tracks by female rappers Nasty and Monie Love), uplifting, feel good party rap (Digital Underground's "Same Song" featuring 2Pac), traditional battle rap (LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out"), weed themed rap (Cypress Hill, who had a head start on the "blunt era" of hip-hop by a good 18 months with this pre-album release version), new jack swing (Father MC), socially conscious rap that pushed for change and equality (Kool G Rap's "Erase Racism" and the Human Education Against Lies -- aka H.E.A.L. project), as well as the more intense Afro-centric or hardcore political rap (Paris, X-Clan, Intelligent Hoodlum, King Sun, Consolidated), and of course gangsta rap (NWA) and player rap (Too $hort). Meanwhile, Ice Cube's incredible December 1990 released EP Kill At Will, featuring such tracks as "Dead Homiez" and "Jackin for Beats," transcended one individual style, and instead melded political with hardcore and gangsta.

Kansas City Confidential & 99 River Street @ The New Beverly Wed & Thur

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 22, 2010 12:15pm | Post a Comment

This Wednesday and Thursday the New Beverly Cinema pairs up a couple of grimy noirs featuring director Phil Karlson and starring John Payne. This double is especially sweet, as 99 River St. is not on DVD and is rarely screened. Throw in roles by  Peggy Castle (I, the Jury), Evelyn Keyes (The Prowler), Nevile Brand (D.O.A.), Coleen Gray (Nightmare Alley), Jack Lambert (Kiss Me Deadly) and the cinematography of George Diskant (Beware My Lovely, On Dangerous Ground, the Racket, Narrow Margin) and you begin to see just how deep this double feature goes.

7165 West Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA  90036
(323) 938-4038

KC Confidential 7:30
99 River Street  9:30



99 River Street trailer

It's Not That Easy Being Green, or a Rock Star: The Runaways, Green Zone & Greenberg

Posted by Charles Reece, March 21, 2010 10:11pm | Post a Comment





I saw three films this weekend, each in its own way a study in the obvious. The Runaways is probably the best (a surprise to me), but in the end it wasn't as juicy as some of the better Behind the Music episodes on VH1 (e.g., Styx and Pantera). Cherie Currie starts off innocent (ignoring her rape by her twin sister's boyfriend), meets guitarist Joan Jett and their oleaginous tongued producer Kim Fowley, gets seduced by drugs and the rock and roll lifestyle, then burns out. The narrative borders on incompetence (amazingly, given the well-worn string of clichés) and leaves out most of the best stuff from the documentary Edgeplay, but as a series of videos involving teenaged sex set to good music with some saucy theorizing from Fowley, it ain't bad.






I'm a fan of Paul Greengrass' Bloody Sunday and United 93, where, in both films, he used our real world knowledge of the moribund finale to build tragic suspense. In Green Zone, however, he and screenwriter Brian Helgeland assume that the audience has no knowledge of the past 7 years, and that all the discoveries made by Chief Miller (Matt Damon) add up to a suspense thriller. Had the film been made in 2003, it would've been brave, but instead it just plays out like a special ops version of Forest Gump in Iraq, where one guy discovers all the truth behind the war. Miller goes chasing the MacGuffin (here called Magellan, a manufactured source providing a Judith Miller-type reporter with a bunch of phony info), only to discover that the war was started on false pretenses. Spoiler alert! Evidently, there were no WMDs as promised, and thankfully this soldier reveals the whole sordid story to various media outlets via an email. As the Chief says, lie about this, and people will begin to question us when we decide to kill people again in the future. Well, he doesn't quite say that, but that's pretty much the moral of the film. Alternatively, I'd suggest the real world moral is lying works.






An old friend of mine and his ex-wife are both counselors who would talk and talk about their problems. If they didn't have a problem to begin a conversation, they'd discover one by the end. That's pretty much what it's like to sit through a Noah Baumbach movie. He reminds me of what the Grim Reaper said in The Meaning of Life: "Shut up, you American. You Americans, all you do is talk, and talk, and say 'let me tell you something' and 'I just wanna say.' Well, you're dead now, so shut up." Ben Stiller's Greenberg is sort of a less funny version of Larry David's Larry David on Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry's our modern day Socrates of the quotidian, whereas Greenberg is yet another asshole cypher through which Baumbach can demonstrate just how "poignant" his concocted miserable worldview is, symbolized (in case you don't get it) by one of those used car lot airmen flailing in the wind. And if you still don't get it, well, there's a couple of tell-all emotional speeches at the end to summarize everything that's gone on before. The film does capture some of LA culture, nevertheless: the obliterative sound of the police chopper in one scene, which is a regular occurrence around 9 pm (right when Lost begins on Tuesdays) and the SUV cutting across a pedestrian's right of way (which has, at various times, caused me to dent a car with my boot, throw a full cup of coffee into a window, or just jump onto the hood of the perp's vehicle -- vigilante justice in the New West).

(Which sees our author recovering.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 21, 2010 12:55pm | Post a Comment

Whew! Am I glad to see you! Because it means that it’s a new week, and let me tell you – I used last week until it was nothing but a grey and tattered rag. So I can’t wear last week anymore, but I can use it to clean my car.

But I don’t have a car.

Life is complicated.

Since I arrived in Hollywood five years ago, a young and vibrant crackerjack of a kid with high hopes and boundless dreams, I have used my wit and spunk to cultivate a lifestyle wherein which I spend most of my time hidden away in my spooky study, hunched over my laptop and writing scripts about young and vibrant crackerjack kids which I ceased to resemble about five years ago. It’s a circle of muthuhfuggin’ life.

As a result, I haven’t ever actually developed a circle of friends. I’ve just kind of Yoko Ono’d my way into my boyfriend’s social circle, hoping no one would notice. People from my hometown find this hard to believe.

“Job, how is it that a young and vibrant crackerjack like you hasn’t been surrounded by fawning admirers?” they collectively ask.

“Well gang,” I answer as I mix up a batch of my famous celebrities, “I’ve just been so focused on my writing career. I’ve already met the person I want to be in a relationship with for the rest of my life, so unlike my single friends I’m not driven out to socialize in order to find a mate; plus there’s something about fun and laughter and good times that gives me a tummy ache.”

But it’s 2010, the year I make contact. I’m done with being a reclusive writer. A writer, yes – I’m that by nature more than choice – but reclusive, no. While I love Virginia Woolf’s books more than I love most people, I don’t want to end up like her. I will rise from her watery grave! (metaphorically speaking) I will walk the Earth and meet it’s people! I will… well, I guess I’ll be a Virginia Woolf zombie? (metaphorically speaking)

A zombie needs a room of her own and brains if she is to write.

Ugh… I hate it when I lose control of these blogs. I’d take medication for my ADD but I always get distracted.

Anyway, last week I uncharacteristically went out for St. Patrick’s Day. Like, to a bar. Where people were.

I know, right?

And here’s the kicker: I had a great time! It turns out that fun and laughter and good times are as enjoyable as they say. Who knew? I still got a tummy ache, but that didn’t come until the next day, after consuming more beer than I had blood in my body.


Did you know if you drink too much beer you get drunk? No one tells me these things! And it gets worse: the next day you feel awful. Like… like… (I’m searching for words to describe how it feels.) Like you've been hung… over some… thing. I don’t know. Hung over something. Hung? Forget about it. It feels gross – let’s leave it at that.

I suppose I should have anticipated this would happen considering that the MC of my evening was my new friend, Señor Danger. The name’s a tip off, I suppose.

Señor Danger picked me up in his truck, which is roughly the size of the state from which he came, and we spent the next two hours looking for parking (I didn’t realize we were looking for parking until about an hour in; I just thought we were taking a really complicated route to his house).

We relaxed in his apartment, drinking some preparatory bruskis, and waited for a taxi. It was my first time at his place, so I quickly snooped his book and music collection, which is always the best way to discover who someone is. Titles like How to Win Friends and Influence People into the Back of Your Windowless Van and The Holy Bible, King’s African Riles Version, would perhaps prompt lesser people to question Señor Danger’s character, but I perceived a diamond in the rough.

No, really. There was this rough patch in his linoleum, and stuck inside it was this perfect, glittering diamond. I showed it to Señor Danger and he said I could keep it! I was so excited. He muttered something more about some curse or something: “…life around me… crumbling into ruin… monkey’s face… etc…” I was too hypnotized by the beauty of the gem to pay attention.

His music library consisted of a lot of country and Latin jazz, and that’s something to be proud of.




The taxi came, and after a classic verbal exchange with a heavily accented driver wherein which each party repeated directions – with neither driver nor passenger fully understanding the other – until everyone gave up and assumed it would all work out (which it usually does), we cruised into Boys Town. All the while the taxi radio blared…


...Which is a song that always makes me kind of sad, because they played it at my Grandma's funeral. But I digress...

We met up with a couple of Señor Danger’s pals, St. Andrew and The Nurse.

“Who names their kids these things?” I wondered to myself, until, and to my relief, I remembered that these were just pseudonyms I was making up for my blog.

After a meal of ground beef patties served on rolls of baked bread, garnished with vegetables, melted cheese and various sauces, plus a few more preparatory brews (see a pattern forming here?) we set out in search of a party.

We ended up at some cantina where beers were $1.00 each, which sounds like a great idea until about $20.00 later. Señor Danger and I were accused of being brothers on a few separate occasions (us white people all look alike), and we alternately answered that we were brothers, or that we were lovers, or on at least one awkward occasion, combined these two answers into one.

Time passed. The bars in West Hollywood seem to match the volume dials on their sound systems with their clocks, so with each passing hour the music grows louder, until about one o’clock ante meridiem, when you can feel the music more than you can hear it. Señor Danger noticed a slight trickle of blood dripping from my ear, so we decided to call it a night.

We walked back to his home in Beverly Hills, all the while discussing what was most broken about us, both emotionally and spiritually – a topic that, as a man of Swedish decent, feels as natural to me as discussing weather.


After safely seeing him home, I set out for my own abode on the Miracle Mile. It was a pretty straight-forward route; from Beverly Hills you head east on Wilshire. Even so, and even with the aid of Google maps, I managed to set forth for what would have eventually been Santa Monica, had my compassionate boyfriend not intervened with a late night car rescue. Did you know that when you’re drunk it makes you more likely to make poor decisions? No one tells me these things!

The next morning I had to go to work at Amoeba Music Hollywood. Here’s where working in a record store has a real advantage: if you show up looking hung-over, you pretty much look like everyone else. I spent the day begging my co-workers to select headache-friendly music choices, such as these:






...All of which is stuff you can find in the back room at Amoeba Music.

My search for new friends and experiences outside my home continues. If you’re interested in being rad with me, do drop me a line. (metaphorically speaking)

Celluloid Heroines - Fearless Filmmaking Females

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 20, 2010 01:28pm | Post a Comment
   

Every female director who's been nominated for an Oscar

On January 31st, The Guardian published an article titled “Why are there so few female filmmakers?” Less than a month later, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win the director’s prize at the 62nd Directors' Guild of America Awards. Then, in March, she repeated that feat at the 82ndOscars, where only three women (Lina Wertmüller, Jane Campion and Sofia Coppola) have previously even been nominated. Although membership of the Academy remains secret, it’s probably fair to assume that it’s disproportionatly male. What is known is that, when it was founded in 1927, there were 33 male members and three females (Mary Pickford, Jeanie MacPherson and Bess Meredyth) – or 8%.

    The money-makers

Although women make up a large percentage of directing students enrolled in film schools, as of 2008, they made up only 9% of Hollywood feature directors. Of the 241 films that have grossed over $100 million in the US in the last decade, only five female directors made the list, Vicky Jenson, Nancy Meyers, Catherine Hardwicke, Anne Fletcher and Phyllida Lloyd. None of them enjoy the fame or recognition of most of their counterparts who appear in front of the camera.

    

Amoeba's female directors with sections

Wicker Men (and Women)

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 19, 2010 04:15pm | Post a Comment
This collection took quite a while to gather...enjoy!

Artist Interviews at Amoeba!

Posted by Amoebite, March 19, 2010 02:40pm | Post a Comment
So many amazing artists have performed live at Amoeba over the years!

While they are at our stores we like to take some time to get to know 'em a little better by having interviews, which we capture on video because we want you to have as much access as us! Check out just sampling of the MANY great artist interviews we have on our website below! For even more interviews click here! 


David Lynch (Hollywood)

Patti Smith (Hollywood)

No Age (Hollywood)

Man Man (San Francisco)

Pete Rock (Hollywood)


Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up: 03:19:10 - Kidz In The Hall, Grieves & Budo, Z-Man, SxSW, Nujabes (RIP), Grand Invincible, Lil Wayne, Reggie Watts, NeoGeo

Posted by Billyjam, March 19, 2010 07:47am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Francisco Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 03:19:10

Decon compiliation
1) U-N-I A Love Supreme 2.0 (Traffic)

2) Ludacris Battle Of The Sexes (DTP Recordings)

3) V/A Decon Presents Never Not Fresh (Decon)

4) Kidz In The Hall Land Of Make Believe (Duck Down)

5) Grieves with Budo 88 Keys & Counting (Rhymesayers Entertainment)

Super talented SoCal duo U-N-I top this week's Amoeba Music San Francisco hip-hop chart with their recommended A Love Supreme 2.0. The record was written about in last week's Hip-Hop Round Up when it was also included on the Hollywood Amoeba's top five chart along with such other releases as Ludacris' ever popular Battle Of The Sexes on DTP/Def Jam. Number two at the San Francisco store, the album is number one in the country this week according to the latest Billboard album chart, arriving at the number one spot with a bullet. Typically a compilation is always a good bet since you get a nice variety of music and the best representation from each artist, but the new Decon Records compilation Decon Presents Never Not Fresh raises the bar quite a few notches. It is an excellent 13 track (plus "Intro" and "Outro" tracks) collection of some of the best tracks from the Decon vaults, including AceyaloneRJD2 (who appear throughout, as well as together on "All For You"), Dilated Peoples ("Spit It Clearly" with The Alchemist), Jay Electronica ("Exhibit A"), Jurassic 5 ("Ducky Boy," which was first reissued a little over a year ago by Decon on the J5 Deluxe Reissue), Skillz ("Take It Back"), Del The Funky Homosapien ("I’m Gonna Make It"), Zion I ("Ride"), and more, with tracks featuring such hip-hop talents as Casual, Chali 2na, Blackalicious, Lyrics Born, Lateef, Haiku D E’tat, Evidence, 88-Keys, and Izza Kizza. Below is the trailer for the compilation.

out this week 3/2 & 3/9...broken bells...jj...gorillaz...frightened rabbit...blueboy...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 18, 2010 04:32pm | Post a Comment
We all have those albums that we love so much that sometimes we like to keep them secret. They are our special little albums that we got crazy obsessed with 10 or 20 years ago that we think nobody else knows about. Of course, the world is much smaller than we sometimes fantasize that it is. There are tons of people just like us who like the same things that we do. Many years ago it was harder to find these people. It was sort of easier to have our secret bands that we liked...or it was at least easier to pretend that we were alone in our love of a certain band. This was before you could go to band's myspace page and see how many friends they had. Before you could read all the blogs about them. One of these bands that I was obsessed with is the great fantastic band called Blueboy. They were one of blueboy dirty magsthe greatest of the 90s British indie bands from the label Sarah Records. They were Twee, but they also had elements of shoegaze, indie pop, and Britpop. Sarah Records disappeared many years ago and most of the albums are impossible to find. However, they have slowly been reissued over the years, but it is these Blueboy albums that I have been waiting for.. I was first introduced to this band in 1996 by one of my ex-boyfriends. I was immediately fascinated and in love. I owned all three of the their albums on CD but sold them a couple of years ago. The relationship had ended and I just couldn't bring myself to listen to these albums anymore. I should have just hidden them a box somewhere to be found many years later, because once time had passed I felt the need to have this band in my life again. So of course I searched everywhere for them and I couldn't find them online anywhere. I couldn't find them in any of the Amoeba stores either. They were eventually reissued digitally and I of course ended up buying them this way, but there is something about owning the physical albums. I never really feel like I own an album if I just have it digitally. It just feels like I taped it off the radio or borrowed it from a friend. It never actually feels like my album until I own the physical CD or LP and have it sitting with the rest of my albums. These Blueboy albums were so important to me that I needed to own them. I felt like something was missing in my life without them. So I was I was still waiting for that day when they would be reissued on CD -- I didn't even care about bonus tracks or remastering. I just wanted them back in my collection.

So my dreams came true and the great El Records reissued the first two Blueboy albums a couple of weeks ago. This is now the third and hopefully last time that I have bought these albums, and they are just as amazing as I remember them. The third album, Bank of England, will be reissued very soon as well. If Wishes Were Horses is their first album from 1992 and Unisex is their second album, out in 1994. By the time I got into this band their career was almost over -- their third and final album came out in 1998. As I mentioned, the first two albums came out on Sarah Records, and the third album came out on Shinkansen Recordings, which was the label started by the guy who ran Sarah. Blueboy had two main members, Keith Girdler and Paul Stewart. Other band members came and went, including Harvey Williams and Gemma Townlet. Keith was diagnosed with cancer in 2004 and passed away in 2007. It for sure gives the music an extra layer of sadness. Blueboy is sort of like the twee Carpenters in that regard. Even though the songs might be about butterflies and lollipops you can't help but feel a sadness and tragedy beneath all that. Harvey Williams also played in The Field Mice and Trembling Blue Stars. Gemma Townlet played in Trembling Blue Stars.

These albums are seriously amazing. Keith Girdler has one of those unmistakable voices that you just don't find every day. It is British, of course, but it somehow has the ability to be both tragic and happy. At times the band sounds like a mellow Smiths, or a more sincere version of the Lightning Seeds. Sort of like a combination of Heavenly and The Smiths. I have still never heard a band quite like them. I really like their first album, but Unisex is the album that I fell in love with. From the moment the violins start it just takes me back to the first time I fell in love with this album. I know there are many out there who were touched by this band but I am happy that these albums are back so a whole new generation can find this band as well. It was also easy for this band to pass you by. They were never as popular as Belle & Sebastian or The Cardigans, but bands like Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Jens Lekman, Voxtrot, Radio Dept., and Camera Obscura have all been heavily influenced by Blueboy. I feel like almost all of the bands I like have something in common with Blueboy. It is twee pop at its best. This band also made it easy for gay boys to fall in love with these albums. Like The Smiths, the songs are often sexually ambiguous. Both of these reissues come with great bonus tracks. Unisex includes "River," "Nimbus," "Hit," "Dirty Mags," "Loony Tunes," and "Toulouse." If Wishes Were Horses includes "Clearer," "Alison," "Popkiss," "Chelsea Guitar," "Fearon," "Meet Johnny Rave," "Elle," "Air France," "Try Happiness," "A Gentle Sigh," and "Stephanie." You can also find these albums for sale on the Amoeba website under the new Buyer's Picks section, so check them out here.

jj no 3
The long awaited first domestic album by JJ also came out this month. I have been hearing great things about this band for almost a year now but it was almost impossible to find the album JJ no. 2 anywhere. Well, don't you worry, that album will soon be put out domestically by our friends at Secretly Canadian. They just released the band's second full length album JJ no. 3. JJ is still really mysterious to me...I don't really know much about them, but I love this new album. They are from Sweden -- another band to add to the long list of bands that I love from Sweden. They are playing soon at the Echo so I will be checking them out there. They are sort of indie pop's version of Sade. Totally mellow and easy to get lost in. They also remind me of a mellow Sting song. I know that Sting combined with Sade sounds horrible, so maybe forget I mentioned that! But I have been listening to their album over and over again. Love it. Check it out for yourself.


The debut album by Broken Bells also came out on 3/9. Broken Bells is James Mercer from the Shins and producer Dangermouse. I had honestly gotten a bit sick of The Shins! They are great and all but I think I just listened to them a bit too much. It sometimes happens to me with even the best albums. I tend to overplay certain things until I am sick of them, so I was glad to see James Mercer going in a slightly different direction. We both needed a change. The new album is just as good as you want it to be. My favorite track on the album right now is "Mongrel Heart," but here is the first single for you to listen to.



also out 3/2...






Hands by Little Boots












Endless Falls by Loscil












Songs of the Sarah Silverman Show












Hidden by These New Puritans







also out 3/9...






Are the Roaring Night by Besnard Lakes












Beat the Devil's Tattoo by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club












Bundles by Bundles












Winter of Mixed Drinks by Frightened Rabbit












Sufi & a Killer by Gonjasufi












Plastic Beach by The Gorillaz












Valleys of Neptune by Jimi Hendrix
 











Tomorrow, in a Year by the Knife












Sisterworld by The Liars












Quarantine the Past by Pavement












Monitor by Titus Andronicus












Last Place You'll Look by We Were Promised Jetpacks



This Week At The New Bev: Adam Green, Lust for Life, Rock Hudson & Doris Day, Phil Karlson & John Payne film noirs, the Grindhouse Film Fest, Pumpkinhead & MORE!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 18, 2010 03:27pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our March / April calendar is now online!
www.newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Thursday March 18

Two Directed by Adam Green!

The New Beverly Cinema presents "An Evening With Adam Green." Join us for a double feature kicking off with FROZEN in glorious 35mm and featuring special cast appearances and a brief Q&A to follow. After that, it's COFFEE & DONUTS, Green's infamous $400 budget first feature film from 1999. This will be the first time COFFEE & DONUTS will be shown publicly in a theater, so for those fans who have been trying to find a way to find it over the past decade... don't miss this exclusive chance! This event will also include some of Green's favorite short films from over the years and, of course, plenty of stories from Green himself.


Frozen
2010, USA, 94 minutes
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt1323045/
written & directed by Adam Green
starring Emma Bell, Shawn Ashmore, Kevin Zegers
7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Alex Chilton Dead at 59

Posted by Whitmore, March 17, 2010 11:30pm | Post a Comment


Alex Chilton (December 28, 1950 - March 17, 2010).
Legendary music icon known for his work in the 1960’s with the chart topping Box Tops and his ground breaking band Big Star is dead from an apparent heart attack in a New Orleans hospital. He was 59.

Alex Chilton Dies At 59. Big Star's Anticipated SxSW Appearance This Saturday Now May Become A Tribute To The Influential Artist

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2010 11:09pm | Post a Comment
alex chilton
Highly influential American singer-guitarist Alex Chilton, best known for his membership in the groups The Box Tops and Big Star, as well as his solo work, died earlier today (3/17) in a New Orleans hospital reportedly the result of heart problems. He was 59.

Chilton was only sixteen when he found himself with the number one pop hit in the country in 1967 with the Box Tops'  hit single “The Letter.” By the end of the decade the group had broken up and Chilton (whom the Replacements wrote a song about, which is known to a new generation from being playable in Rock Band 2) went on to form the influential (albeit never commercially big) power-pop group Big Star.

The group was to be one of the biggest attractions at this year’s SXSW music festival, happening in Austin, Texas this week. The reunited  Big Star (who played the Fillmore in SF three years ago) was scheduled to play this Saturday (3/20) night.  Earlier that day both Big Star drummer Jody Stephens and Big Star bassist Andy Hummel (who are already in Austin tonight) were booked to appear on a SxSW music panel (Chilton was not booked on the same panel) all about Big Star and their influence. According to a few sources down in Austin tonight, Chilton's bandmates are considering going ahead with the panel, only now it will become a tribute to the late great Alex Chilton. And as for exactly what will happen in place of the scheduled Big Star concert late Saturday night, it is still uncertain but many are already speculating that it will become a big scale tribute concert with many surprise guests performing in honor of the man.

Big Star "Thirteen" from the 1972 LP #1 Record (Ardent/Stax)

Irish Hip-Hop Overview

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2010 10:28pm | Post a Comment
Rob Kelly
Like many countries outside of the birthplace of hip-hop, the true beginnings of Irish hip-hop took hold a decade + after its birth Stateside. Today the European country boasts a healthy, albeit still somewhat underground, hip-hop scene with many talented MCs, DJs, b-boys, and graffiti artists.

In the latter half of the eighties several Irish artists embraced hip-hop, including Sinead O'Conner, who teamed up in 1988 with MC Lyte on the single remix of the track "I Want Your (Hands On Me)." Some years later in the early 1990's O'Conner would collaborate with the political UK based group Marxman, which included two Irish born members, on the song "Ship Ahoy." There were also many scratch DJs (including DJ Mek) and b-boys starting out in the late 80's, a time when hip-hop began to make inroads on Irish music.

Many longtime Irish hip-hop heads cite the late eighties and specifically the occasions when Schoolly D and Public Enemy each played gigs in the Irish capital as pivotal moments in hip-hop taking hold in the Emerald Isle -- kind of like how those in the UK a decade earlier went to see the Sex Pistols in concert and were so directly influenced that they then went out and formed their own punk groups. "That Public Enemy concert at McGonagles changed my life," old school Dublin hip-hop diehard Laz-E, a DJ and former b-boy, told me, adding that many others at that same 1988 PE concert were directly influenced, especially by Chuck D and company. But it took a few years before a real hip-hop scene with a distinctive Irish flavor while also staying true to hip-hop's Bronx roots would properly eScary Eiremerge in Ireland.

March 17, 2010

Posted by phil blankenship, March 17, 2010 10:24pm | Post a Comment

Vagabonds of the Western World

Posted by Kells, March 17, 2010 05:21pm | Post a Comment
Happy St. Patrick's Day, everyone! While you suck down a shamrock shake or a Guinness float (it's a little toastier than usual here in San Francisco at present) or sip on some whiskey from the jar-o today, please remember to raise your glass and toast the greatest rock band to ever come out of Ireland; this one's for Thin Lizzy!


What can I say about Thin Lizzy that hasn't already been said? To quote Peter May, "when Thin Lizzy first hit the pubs in Dublin in 1970 they were quickly heralded as the best band since Van Morrison's Them." With a long list of classic/ hard rock radio hits like "The Boys are Back in Town," "Whiskey in the Jar," "Jailbreak," and the Bob Seger penned "Rosalie," Thin Lizzy and their particular brand of vagabond rocker timelessness stands forever poised to span the annals of rock 'n' roll legend despite the early death of founding frontman and bassist Phil Lynott at the age of thirty-six. Revered by longhairs young and old and frequently lovingly covered by the likes of Iron Maiden, Motorhead and Metallica, there is no evidence that the adoration rockers around the world feel for Lynott and the many skilled members of his skinny Lizzy throughout the years will ever fade away. 

This Friday night, March 19th, at Amoeba Music San Francisco, I'll be spinning nothing but Thin Lizzy in tribute to the world's greatest Irish rock band. I'll be focusing on the more Irish influenced Lizzy jams and other choice deep cuts like the title track from Thin Lizzy's third album, Vagabonds of the Western World (a favorite of mine and one that sadly, along with several other Lizzy releases, never gets any play in the store -- an oversight I seek to remedy). Got a request? Come on down and lay it on me -- especially if it's something you think I don't have. I'm more than a fan, baby, I'm cruisin in the Lizzy mobile!

Also, if you've never checked out any live footage of Thin Lizzy (like the fabulous Live and Dangerous DVD) here is a little nugget of unreleased amazingness that really needs to be locked down, remastered and shipped out (to my house, immediately)! After scouring the shelves at Amoeba and sifting through countless vidoes on dem innernets, this is a clip that I believe deserves top billing as Lizzy at their brightest and very best, live in Sydney, Australia 1978. Enjoy:

The Vinyl Confidential, 3.3 – The Odd Order of Oblong Boxes

Posted by Whitmore, March 17, 2010 04:55pm | Post a Comment
“It was one of those evenings when the sky came down for its close-up, gray and dingy, wrapping itself around every megasized Hollywood billboard. The fog blanketed the windows of Amoeba like a broke down record geek trying to sneak out a satchel of stolen platters under his coat, and every time some honey lurched for the front door, he’d think “is now the time to dash for the exit while security talks up the sweet thing who just walked in from the rain?”
 
Meanwhile down in the used 45 section, in the middle of the dozens of colorful boxes filled with musty records, some with enough gray, dingy dust thrown in to make you choke, two employees with barely two bits of sense between them were arguing over what was the better Dee Dee Warwick single, “You're No Good” or “I'm Gonna Make You Love Me.” That is, until a cool pair of legs in an outfit too short for the weather walked past us. Casually folded around her waist, a studded belt whispered sweet nothings to the black satin skirt she wore, she was young but her expression said she knew her stuff. Her muck boots looked like two skinned Siamese cats, suddenly a chorus of “Cat Scratch Fever” bopped into my head. Our employee conversation evaporated instantly.
 
Glancing about the shelves for a moment, in a matter of fact manner she said she needed to score some good Northern Soul ... if we had any. “You’ve come to the right place.” I pointed to the appropriate oblong box. She gave another box a swift shove out of the way as she reached into one marked Soul, quickly grabbing a record in a plain white sleeve on the old Blue Rock label. Staring at her new find for a split second, her lips tipped with a wicked grin, she snarled, “You’re both completely wrong.” As she sauntered away, she flashed us the single "We're Doing Fine," Dee Dee Warwick, 1965. She was right, absolutely right. And just before I decided I could only afford a wet evening alone, her hips waved back, certifying, "see you later fools.”

New Electronic/House 12" at Amoeba Hollywood: Kirk Degiorgio, Donato Dozzy, Chymera, Lindstrom, Idjut Boys & More..

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, March 17, 2010 04:21pm | Post a Comment

KIRK DEGIORGIO
Membrane 12"
Planet E

"1990 was the decade Kirk established healthy roots with the network trio of Detroit producers: Derrick May, Juan Atkins and Kevin Saunderson. In preparation for Kirk's most influential journey to the US, he collaborated demos with Ed Handley and Andy Turner under the collective The Black Dog. During his inspirational visit to Detroit, Kirk took notice of the affordable studio setups he observed at Transmat, Metroplex and KMS. Consequently Kirk sold his entire record collection upon his return to London and invested in an Atari, Akai S950 sampler, a broken TB303 and a Roland R8 drum machine. To complete his Detroit-inspired studio, the last pieces were actually loaned from Derrick -- including a Kawai K3 and the infamous DX100. Fast forward to the more present time and Kirk has released purist techno EPs for an EMI subsidiary New Religion. For the same label he has collaborated with Dan Keeling under the name Critical Phase and together with Alex Bond has also coordinated the joint ART-New Religion compilation The Electric Institute. On this compilation Kirk shocked purists with the techno breaks track 'Whatever Happened To The Cosmic Kid,' which was co-written with Dan Keeling and Chris Martin of Coldplay. Kirk's revolutionary pulse has been recognized and is credited with being the first known professional DJ to use Ableton Live alongside vinyl for his DJ sets. A tour of Japan 2002 saw him use Live exclusively which he has now done ever since in venues worldwide. Kirk paved the way for the current popularity of laptop DJing."




DONATO DOZZY & PETER VAN HOESEN
Talis/Into The Red 12"
Curle

The second Curle offering of 2010 features the first collaboration between Donato Dozzy, with his unique hypnotic sound that you can hear on his releases for labels such as Orange Groove, Elettronica Romana and Aquaplano, and Brussels' own Peter Van Hoesen. The B-side features a dancefloor destroyer from Matt O'Brien, who you may know from his Off-Key Industries imprint.








NICK HOPPNER
Brush Me Down EP 12"
Ostgut

Nick Höppner presents 3 excursions for Ostgut Ton, plus a remix by Lee Jones. Almost entirely constructed from field recordings taken within the walls of Berghain, "Brush Me Down" is a textural, energetic jam. Jones' remix is a fragmented jazz interpretation that brings together club, dub and 2step. "Umbrella Pitch" unfolds like a sinister drama, with a warm and exultant theme slowly emerging. "Dancing On The Head Of A Pin" is a super-concentrated symphony that bubbles and floats along in its own celestial realm.







CHYMERA
RUMOURS OF MY DEMISE EP 12"
Komplex Deep

Great release of the deep house label that keeps on building. Already acclaimed track by those lucky enough to have received the promos! Includes the original version as well as a MASTER H remix. Definitely lurking toward the old school masters Ron & Chez.










HAKIM MURPHY & INBUM CHO

Nothing 12"
Nowar

A beautiful organic trip into deep grooves & lullaby melodies on a steady deep house rhythm. It's an armchair staring-at-the-night house essential! On remix duty is Dubbyman, adding strings and echoing vocals to come up with a sexy & deep house gem. Sleeve looks tight, too. (NOWAR)











KOTEY EXTRA BAND & BOTTIN

Hot Ring 12"
Bear Funk

STEVIE KOTEY & BOTTIN team up for the chunky discoid romper "HOT RING," a track full of stabs, rolling bass, tight drums, & spaced out synths. BOTTIN gives his "EXPRESSO DUB," a more stripped down version especially made for dancers & FERNANDO's remix cuts through like a polyester crease!








ANDY VAZ

Shadow City 12"
Yore

The a-side's "Y THEME" gets deeply moving with a funky house pulse before stroking the fire with speaking voices before the groove gets intense. "SHADOW CITY" opts for a deeper and more serenading vibe that gets slinky at the 3 min mark. "MUMBAI DWELLER" is pure tribal house funk!











LINDSTROM

Baby Can't Stop EP Part 2 12"
Smalltown Supersound

LINDSTROM's "BABY CAN'T STOP" returns for part 2 with the help of vocalist CHRISTABELLE and 2 remixes by some of today's new disco dons. PRINS THOMAS provides a groovy number with an upbeat horn section while UK legends THE IDJUT BOYS do what they do on the flip for maximum dancefloor boogie.








DOLLY LA PARTON
It's Just A Thing/Cornbread, Fish & Collard Greens 12"
Bemysheep

"Are you ready? Bemysheep is back stronger than ever, with the same old mission: to reconvert dance classics into actual dance-floor techno and house killers. And who is the best in doing that? Dolly La Parton, no doubt about it. Alex Under is the man behind Dolly La Parton and what he delivers is just pure dancemania: original, raw and groovy, both tracks included in this release are pure slices of music madness. 'It's Just A Thing' blends jazz improvisation with techno euphoria while 'Cornbread, Fish & Collard Greens' may be the deepest, blackest and funkiest dance track of 2010, a ritual of rhythm invention and futuristic manipulation. 20% of the profits will be destined for growth and preservation of Spanish sheep cattle. Take us seriously and welcome home... the party just started." Housed in a silkscreened tote bag that will have everyone at the party talking. BMS



AUDISION - Surface To Surface Remix Part 1 12"

MAETRIK - Underrate Dis EP 12"

CHRIS LIEBING VS. GREEN VELVET - Auf Und Ab Und Kinda High (Dustin Zahn Mix)/Arctica 10"

REZKAR - Above The Clouds 12" (RB 021EP)

VA - DIAL 2010 (1) 12"

VA - Spectral Document Pt. 2 12"

BILLY SHANE - Runner 12"

STEPHEN BROWN/CLUB LONELY - Universal Consciousness 2.0 12"

VILLALOBOS/CLEVER & SMART - 808 The Bassqueen/Flitadelic 12"

MARC DEPULSE - Twintig 12"

GREG GOW: Pilgrimage EP 12"

MIRKO LOKO: SEVENTYNINE-CARL CRAIG 12"

MRK 1: THE ELECTRICIAN 12”

IN FLAGRANTI: EX EX EX D12"

LV & UNTOLD: BEACON (MT. KIMBIE RMX) 12”

TEK-ONE: BROKEN STRING 12"

MOCK & TOOF: FAREWELL TO WENDO 12"

Flossin' Season - Leprechaun Movies, Music, &c

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 17, 2010 12:30pm | Post a Comment

Everyone knows a couple of things about leprechauns (aka lurachmain, lurican, leprechawn, lepracaun, leprechaun, lubberkin and lurgadhan). They’re small, tricky gingers that, if caught, will show you the money. One theory about the word’s origin is that it comes from luacharma'n (or luchorpán), the Irish word for “pygmy.” Another theory is that the word is derived from leath bhrogan, meaning “shoemaker.” Not as many people know but leprechauns usually find employment as cobblers or shoemakers. Presumably they make and repair the shoes of other faerie folk and Tuatha Dé Danann, because how else could they make money off each other if they all practice the same trade? And leprechauns make money. If you lay your eyes on one, don’t look away or they’ll vanish.

Although the Irish believe that leprechauns emigrated from the island of Fir Bolg, they’ve nonetheless become one of the most common stereotypical images of Eire, along with that Romano-British Englishman, Sanctus Patricius, whose saint day is (of course) today.

Remembering Tammi Terrell, Who Died 40 Years Ago Today

Posted by Whitmore, March 16, 2010 08:11pm | Post a Comment

40 years ago today
, Thomasina Winifred Montgomery, better known as Tammi Terrell, died of a brain tumor just a month short of her 25th birthday. She was one of that incredible crop of 1960’s soul diva’s who knew how to seduce or belt out a song. Today she is best remembered for her Motown duets with Marvin Gaye with singles like “Ain't No Mountain High Enough”, “Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing”, “Your Precious Love” and “You're All I Need to Get By.”
 
Born in Philadelphia in 1945, as a teenager Tammi Terrell recorded for the Scepter/Wand label, releasing two solo discs under the name Tammy Montgomery. Both singles released in 1961, “If You See Bill,” and “Voice of Experience,” failed to chart. At about the same time, she also did session work doing backup vocals for the legendary Shirelles. In 1963 she was discovered by James Brown and joined his Revue. While under contract with Brown, Tammi released one single on his Try Me label, “I Cried.” At the time it was rumored that Terrell and Brown were romantically involved, something that didn’t quite fly with her parents, leading to her quick departure; she was replaced by Anna King. Next she signed with Checker Records' label, releasing one single, “If I Would Marry You.” Unfortunately her string of unsuccessful releases continued. In 1965 she signed with Motown, Barry Gordy changed her name to Tammi Terrell, and there she finally scored a couple of Top 30 singles on the R&B charts with 1966’s "I Can't Believe You Love Me" and "Come on and See Me." But it was when she was paired up with Marvin Gaye in 1967 that success finally came, fast and furious, with five top three R&B charting singles in just over a year. But all her success was short lived. On October 14, 1967, while in concert at Ogden Hall at the Hampton Institute in Hampton, Virginia, she collapsed on stage in Gaye's arms. She was rushed to the hospital, where she was later diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. She had complained of severe migraine headaches for some time.
 
For years now stories have circulated that Tammi was the victim of a physically abusive boyfriend who had not only thrown her down a flight of stairs, but had also hit her over the head with a steel chair. But no actual allegations were ever proved. Terrell would undergo eight separate operations over the next three years for cancer; suffering from memory loss, numbness and weakness, blindness, she become far too sick to work. Eventually she was confined to a wheelchair and her weight dropped to under 85 lbs.
 
Tammi Terrell died on March 16th, 1970. She’s buried in Mount Lawn Cemetery in Philadelphia.
 
Marvin Gaye was devastated by her death. He took a long hiatus from live performances. And in his period of self-isolation, amidst his depression he re-evaluated his whole concept of what music might say. The result was the classic 1971 album What's Going On, a meditative, low key work which dealt, in part, with Tammi Terrell's death and issues of the world around him -- injustice, suffering and hatred.



The Employee Interview Part XXIV: Erin

Posted by Miss Ess, March 16, 2010 04:50pm | Post a Comment
Erin
Rock Floor Person Extraordinaire
2.5 yrs employment


Miss Ess: First, let's talk about something we both love: the new Joanna Newsom record. Tell me, what is it that makes it so fantastic for you, and what are your favorite tracks?


Erin: Okay, so I am really into the new Joanna Newsom record [Have One on Me] for a number of reasons. I was obsessed, totally in love with her last album, Ys, but that album was very structured, very rigid compared to this one. It was definitely a song cycle, whereas this one is a little more free form. She's loosened up quite a bit and her singing has improved. The things I love about her are still the same -- her love of words, her incredibly poetic turns of phrase -- but she has relaxed a little in a way that I'm enjoying. Some of the songs on here, like "Good Intentions Paving Company" and especially "Baby Birch," are some of the best she's ever written, I think. She's really only getting better. 

ME: What else is turning on your record player these days?

Erin: I've also been listening to Greg Gardner's comp In A Cloud -- all really great local artists. My favorite track on here is the Paula Fraser one. And the first Giant Sand record -- Valley of Rain. 

Films and Video Games

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 16, 2010 12:34pm | Post a Comment

With Tron – Legacy, the sequel to a movie about video games, scheduled to open in theaters this coming December and Tron – Evolution, a video game based on a sequel of a movie about a video game scheduled for release in November, now seems like a perfect time to look at the Ouroboros-like nature of film and video games and film.

     

In the early 1980s, Hollywood still sometimes made films that weren’t re-makes, adaptations or sequels and before there were movies adapted from video and computer games, there were movies about video and computer games. Tron (1982) was the granddaddy of them all. The Wizard (1989), WarGames (1983), Joysticks (1983), Cloak and Dagger (1984) and The Last Starfighter (1984) soon followed. 

In a culture where toys (Rubik the Amazing Cube anyone?) and sugar cereal are fleshed out into serialized children’s narratives (Cap'n Crunch - available on DVD), it was perhaps inevitable that video games would be adapted into cartoons. About the only thing memorable from Saturday Supercade (with segments including Donkey Kong, Frogger, Q*Bert, Donkey Kong Jr, Pitfall Harry, Space Ace and Kangaroo) was the excellent theme song. I have little memory of Pac-Man (1984) but was a big fan of Pole Position (1984), a show that really fleshed out the narrative of the game, which just featured a race car… racing. A couple of years later, the first film based on a video game appeared – in Japan - Super Mario Bros. - Peach-Hime Kyushutsu Dai Sakusen! (1986).

Iggy & Stooges Among Those To Be Inducted Into Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame Tonight

Posted by Billyjam, March 15, 2010 03:25pm | Post a Comment
stooges fun house
As predictable as the negative reactions to most published year end "best of" music lists (typically cries of "Hey, how come so-and-so is not on the list?)," so too are the flood of negative reactions to the annual Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, which is especially understandable since only a handful of artists make it each year. With just five new artists chosen from thousands upon thousands of acts from the past several decades of music, an outcry is totally understandable.  But rather than whine and moan about who is not on the list, I prefer to celebrate the music of those who did make it on the list this year.

Happening this evening, this year's induction is being broadcast at 8:30pm on Fuse TV. The lucky five inductees include Iggy Pop's seminal punk act The Stooges, Genesis, The Hollies, ABBA, and Jimmy Cliff -- all of whom are featured in the video clips below. Included there are a live Iggy and the Stooges clip from 1970 performing both "TV Eye" and "1970" live with an entertaining TV announcer doing a play by play of Iggy's on and off stage antics, ABBA's 1977 video for their hit "Take A Chance On Me," The Hollies doing their mid sixties hit "Bus Stop" live, Genesis live from 1973 when Phil Collins was still on the drums and vocalist Peter Gabriel was still with the group, and Jimmy Cliff from the soundtrack to the film The Harder They Come

Tonight's TV broadcast will also feature performances from Chris Isaak, Faith Hill, Adam Levine, and many others. More info here.

Hair Penitent: Shampoo (1975)

Posted by Charles Reece, March 14, 2010 10:33pm | Post a Comment
 

Peter Biskind's new book, Star: How Warren Beatty Seduced America, is an enjoyably salacious tale of the intersection between star power, the death of the 60s and auteurship. During the editing of Reds (1981), Beatty's team took to calling him Masturbeatty due to his obsessive-compulsive tendencies that resulted in an estimated 3 million feet of film (which shifted even Stanley Kubrick to Ed Wood's one-take side of the production curve). He made Gene Hackman do over 80 takes for one line, and then required his editors to consider the nuances of each delivery to divine the best interpretation. Editing took about a year and a half. That is to say, Beatty wasn't fond of the accidental and liked to be in complete control, which sums up his personal relations, as well:

"Two people cannot both live for one person[.] Warren didn't want me to act. He wanted me to be with him all the time[.] When Barbara Walters asked him about all the women in his life, he said, 'Well, they always broke up with me, I never broke up with them.' While I was watching the interview, I was holding m stomach laughing so hard [I fell] on the floor. That certainly is the strategy that works for some men. But you can't go with a hundred different women and a hundred different women reject you, over and over again, when you're such a wonderful person." -- Michelle Phillips

Probably the most notorious Lothario of the 60s and 70s, Beatty's line of sexual conquests rivals his spools of film footage (Biskind estimates over 12,000, not including hand- and/or blowjobs). Like his politics, his sexual preferences were rather staid, but the power trip wasn't all that far off from what Pasolini depicted in Salò. He'd point, and one of his handlers would fetch. "Masturbeatty" is right -- who needs one's own hand when others are willing to do it for you? And like most cads, he was possessive of the women (at least the ones who stayed with him for more than 5 minutes), narcissistically requiring a level of devotion that he never expected of himself ('serial monogamy' was his euphemism for it). He was the embodiment of what many feminists defined as "free love," another excuse for male domination.


"Even the promiscuous feel pain." -- Warren Beatty

Thus, Shampoo's George Roundy, who exploits his job as a hairdresser to bed as many women in Beverly Hills as humanly possible, was his response to feminist critics, an auteurist critique/apologia of his own proclivities. Hal Ashby is the director, but by all accounts his was a for-hire position with producer/star/co-writer Beatty being control, and who pretty much willed the film into existence. The script began as a Robert Towne project, but it was Beatty who added the political critique as, I suspect, a way of distancing himself from the character of George. Unlike the star, who had recently spent a year and half in a failed attempt to get George McGovern elected president, George is apolitical and single (or simple) mindedly devoted to one thing, getting laid. In keeping with the tendency of the most overrated decade in American cinema, Shampoo begins as a well-worn genre structure -- in this case, the screwball comedy -- and begins to sag under the weight of all the ideological allegory being dumped into it. The result is that it sacrifices genre expectations (laughs) for lugubrious self-importance. But, just like Taxi Driver and Apocalypse Now, what a fascinating mess it is. (I sometimes think Kindergarten Cop is one of the last films created in the spirit of the 70s, with its beginning as a light-hearted comedy about Schwarzenegger as a cop going undercover in a kindergarten and ending in a bloodbath at the school.)

      

George loves sex so much that he can't stop himself from fucking Felicia (Lee Grant), the wife of Lester (Jack Warden), a potential investor for a hair salon that he's trying to open. Likewise, he can't stop fucking Lester's mistress, Jackie (Julie Christie), nor can he resist an offer from Lester's daughter, Lorna (Carrie Fisher). Lester doesn't suspect anything, because he assumes all male hairdressers are gay. The only woman who appears to have a job is George's young actress girlfriend, Jill (Goldie Hawn), which hardly helps his counter-argument to feminism. Of the four actresses, he had just gotten over a long-term relationship with Christie (although they continued to have intermittent sex), screwed Hawn on occasion, and offered to end 17-year old Fisher's virginity repeatedly during the shoot. So, there's a lot of Beatty in this role. Rather than just let the film be a frothy sex romp with a series of comedic mishaps, he had to prove just how serious he was. George had to end up miserable (just like all the major protagonists in the decade), realizing what he'd sacrificed for his hedonism. For the same reason, the televisions are always on to remind the viewer that the story is set in '68, as Nixon (who was ending his career due to the Watergate Scandal as the film was being made) is becoming the president. They're all playing as the country burns.
 
  

Beatty learned his craft under some of the more politically controversial figures in the film business -- Elia Kazan being the most infamous. What's interesting about Shampoo is the defensive posturing as critique that Kazan practiced in attempting to justify the naming of names during the Hollywood blacklisting days. As Beatty said of his mentor, everyone was a victim. Yeah, okay, but some of these victims were able to continue making movies while others could not. Similarly, when George decides that Jackie is more than a means to an end -- is his one true love -- only to realize it's too late, he's shown to be a victim of sexual liberation. Against feminist charges of misogyny, George is the pawn of aggressive wealthy women, as one who fucks only for pleasure, not to get something else out of it (money or cultural capital). However, by focusing audience identification on George, making the tragic-comedic arc about him, the film tends to ignore the effects this vacuous milieu has on the women in his life. Jackie, who's supposed to be a free spirit (much like Christie was claimed to be), finally gives up on George to go off with the just separated Lester, who's been paying her way as his mistress. We're left to feel bad for George, but at least he's his own man, whereas her choice is reduced to which philanderer promises more financial security. So as to lessen any sympathies the audience might have for Jill's suffering, she's given -- using a classic conceit for the third wheel in romantic comedies -- another love interest. Undeterred, we can get back to George's misery and, by extension, Beatty's.

Retro World Music Vinyl Releases For 2010

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 14, 2010 09:20pm | Post a Comment
It's great to see so many people buying World Music vinyl. Our World Music LP section went from a little portion at the end of the section to an afterthought at the end of Rock Vinyl, and now has its own row at the beginning of the World Music section. Not only can you get many of our new releases on vinyl, but you can also snatch up plenty of used gems, vinyl only releases and many items that were never issued on CD. Of the Top 40 World Music sellers in February, several were vinyl releases. 
Here are some of our latest releases that you may want to check out for yourself. Everything from World Psychedelic to Afrobeat to French Crooners and Afro-Colombian jams...

V/A-Black Man’s Cry
This is a 4X10 inch collection of Fela Kuti cover songs from Caribbean, American, African and Colombian artists. Check out Cumbia Moderna De Soledad's version of "Shacalao" It's way too hot!

V/A- ATENSHION! - Varefleshion 1967-1976
Spanish Psyche, only 500 made! Some garage and some post-Santana jams, all solid.

Las Grecas-Gypsy Rock
Proto Gypsy/Psyche rock band from early 70’s. A must have!

V/A- Nigeria Special Vol 2 -- Modern Highlife, Afro Sounds, & Nigerial Blues 1970 to 1976
A 3-LP set that contains three more songs than the CD version. A mixed bag of Nigerian sounds from the 70's.

V/A-Nigeria Afrobeat Special-The New Explosive Sound in 1970s Nigeria
Also a 3-LP set which has five more tracks than the CD version. Hot Afrobeat from the country that originated it.

V/A-Diggin' Down Argentina
Argentina is known all over Latin America for producing the best rock music. This collection of little known garage rock gems from the late 60's/early 70's would have even the biggest Argentine Rock fan scratching their heads trying to figure out who these artists are. Severe deep cuts on one LP.

V/A-Brazilian Guitar Fuzz Bananas-Tropicalista Psychedelic Masterpieces 1967 to 1976
Lot of fuzz of Psyche. The Tropicalia movement makes me think of Hippies smoking pot on the beach. This album makes me think of dirty hippies doing speed and acid in a sweaty bar somewhere in Rio De Janeiro. Dirty and grimy guitar based jams! 

Serge Gainsbourg-Vol 2 -- 7 EP Box Set 1963 to 1968 (7 x 7 inch set)
If you are a Serge geek, you need to get this! Includes "Bonnie And Clyde,"  "Comic Strip" and "Bubble Gum" (with Brigitte Bardot), "Marilu" and other pre-Melody Nelson gems.

V/A- Thai Beat A Go Go Vol 2-Groovy 60's Sounds From The Land of Smiles
V/A-Thai Beat A Go Go Vol 1-Wild Rockin' 60's Sounds From The Land Of Smiles
Both LPs are chock full of kitchy pop, boogaloo, funk and rock done by Thai bands during the 60's. Limited edition, as all Subliminal Frequencies releases are.

Coming soon:

V/A- Si Para Usted The Funky Beats Of Revolutionary Cuba  Vol. 1 & 2
Classic Cuban musicians that went experimental and funky during the late sixties/early 70’s.

V/A- Afrosound Of Colombia
This is Vampisoul's attempt at the Discos Fuentes catalog and it's the hottest yet! Do not sleep on this one, it's going to be a burner! This comp is less Cumbia and more Afro-Colombian. My personal favorite track is "Cumbia De Sal" done by Cumbia En Moog...that's right, a Moog Cumbia track from 1979...it's too much!


(In which we learn the true story of St. Patrick.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 14, 2010 06:52pm | Post a Comment

Rad.

I’ve only just returned from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) where I spent the morning with my pal, Señor Danger. I was eager to visit one of their current exhibits, American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765–1915, because it showcases one of my favorite works, Watson and the Shark, by hunky bad boy John Singleton Copley.

I’ll be honest: there was a moment when Señor Danger and I silently tried to work out a plan where we could sneak the painting out under my jacket or something, but my jacket isn’t 35 feet wide, so we opted to just stand there and marvel at it a bit.

The exhibit is fantastic, and anyone who can should check it out. I realize that most people don’t live in Los Angeles, but still, make an effort. As an added incentive, anyone who travels to the LACMA from more than 100 miles away gets a free Colt Model 1873 Single Action Army revolver autographed by Mary Pickford!*

This Wednesday is Saint Patrick’s Day. It’s also the birthday of Nat “King” Cole, John Wayne Gacy, Seneca St. James, Emperor Shijō, and Nalii DeLap. What do all these people have in common? Uh, their birthdays are all on St. Patrick’s Day – are you paying attention or what?


For many of us, St. Patrick’s Day is a mildly amusing 24 hours, most commonly marked by drinking beer the color of anti-freeze and getting to pinch and touch fellow co-workers without being sued for sexual harassment. But this day means more – so much more. So very much more. More. Much.

Much.

The history behind St. Patrick’s Day is rich, and vital to understanding the psyche of the Irish, for whom March 17 is a national holiday. (I don't have anything to substantiate this claim of Irish psychology, but that's okay because... of... um... OH WOW LOOK!!!)


(Taken from his Grindr profile)

Almost nothing factual is known about St. Patrick. Thankfully, this has never stopped the Catholic Church from deifying, believing and creating rules and tradition based upon someone. What we do know is that he was born into a wealthy, Romano-British family whose pottery collection was the envy of every patrician across the Isles.

One day, while dressing up like corned beef & cabbage, he was kidnapped by a gang of hungry Irishmen who shipped him to Mayo, Ireland. While working part-time as a slave, Patrick had a dream in which God told him he should escape his imprisonment. (It’s interesting to note that Patrick didn’t  come up with this idea on his own. I mean, really – you needed Divine Intervention for that? Do you think Jesus also descended from Heaven and advised Patrick to eat food using his mouth and not his elbows? Or to never stick harpoons into his eyes? There’s certain common sense concepts for which we shouldn’t have to rely on mystic visions to comprehend. But I digress…)

Patrick followed God’s suggestion and escaped back to Britain. He eventually got a job being a bishop (which was good – provided full health and dental) and spent his time saving souls from an eternal damnation of hellfire and collecting thimbles.


"God appeared to me and said I should never try to kiss these."

In 432 AD (the same year that saw the death of everyone’s favorite emperor, 赫連定 - boo hoo!) Bishop Patrick returned to Ireland to convert its people to Christianity and maybe grab a tour of the Guinness Brewery. While he wasn’t the most successful of all the early Missionaries, he was the only one that could crack his knuckles two different ways.


Patrick used the shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity, assigning one leaf each to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. (This is the origin of our association with shamrocks and St. Patrick’s.) One day, when teaching this very lesson, he unwittingly used a rare, four-leaf clover, which resulted in their being one leaf extra. When the crowd of pagans listening to him asked what the extra leaf represented, Patrick, on the spot, blurted out that it represented his Aunt Gina.

“How is she an equal to God?” the crowd asked.

“Well,” Patrick fumbled, “She’s sweet and... just... she makes real good scones.”

The crowd was displeased with this answer and insisted that their local baker, Dáirine Cétchathach, made the best scones ever – they even had a bit of jelly in the middle “which ye wouldst find most yummy” – prompting those gathered to begin worshipping at the bakery, where the Eucharist was administered on disposable paper doilies with a sprinkling of powdered sugar meant to symbolize the suffering of Our Lord on the Cross, and cappuccinos were sipped to represent His Blood (sugar cubes Transubstantiated into Jesus’ body were optional).

Patrick flew into a rage and threw the four-leaf clover to the ground.

“This turn of events is most unlucky!” he cried to his secretary, a hearing impaired man who quickly made note of this.

Years later, everything that’s happened so far in history took place and that’s how we came to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day now.


And that's the true history behind St. Patrick's Day (except for the untrue parts). Yippee.


*Offer not valid to children under 4 years of age, the sight impaired, pregnant women, or anyone else at all.

Beds

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 13, 2010 12:00pm | Post a Comment
OK, I cheated and added a couple of chairs and even a Captain in his PJ's because I felt that they added a little flavor to the collection.

Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up: 03:12:10: Ludacris, U-N-I, Women's History Month, Lil Wayne In Rikers, Rated Z Radio Out of LV

Posted by Billyjam, March 12, 2010 09:40am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Hollywood Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 03:12:10

Ludacris
1) Ludacris Battle Of The Sexes (DTP Recordings)

2) Madlib Medicine Show No. 2, Flight To Brazil (Stones Throw)

3) U-N-I A Love Supreme 2.0 (Traffic)

4) Black Eyed Peas The E.N.D. (Interscope)

5) Strong Arm Steady In Search of Stoney Jackson (Stones Throw)

Ludacris is back and back on top with this week's number one album at Amoeba Music Hollywood. Battle of the Sexes on DTP (Disturbing Tha Peace via Def Jam), which is the ATL based rapper's seventh studio album, tackles the timeless, universal theme of the difference between the two sexes. Taking over a year to record, the album features guests spots from the likes of Flo Rida, Ne-Yo, Nicki Minaj, Trey Songz, Lil' Kim, Eve, Monica, and Trina. A little reminiscent of his fun early work, this album, featuring the already successful club banger single "How Low" (see video below), is likely to be one of Luda's most successful releases to date. Great tracks include "Everybody Drunk" featuring Lil' Scrappy and "Party No Mo" featuring Gucci Mane. The battle of the sexes, the relationship between men and women, and the double standards that sometimes occur, are squarely addressed on such album tracks as "Hey Ho" feat. Lil' Kim, "I Know You Got A Man" feat. Flo Rida, "B.O.T.S. Radio" feat. Shawna and Lil' Fate, and "I Do It All Night" feat. Shawna. And on the 15 track album's entertaining, Neptunes-produced closing track "Sexting," the rapper talks about Tiger Woods' marital woes and the issue of sex addiction.

DJ Zita Interview About Queendom: Fly Ladies Reppin The 4 Elements Of Hip Hop At La Pena Saturday, March 13th

Posted by Billyjam, March 12, 2010 07:38am | Post a Comment

In celebration of Women's History Month, tireless Bay Area artist DJ Zita of B.A.S.S./Bay Area Sistah Sound, in conjunction with La Pena, has organized the first in an annual all female artist hip-hop showcase that pays tribute to each of the genre's four elements: MC'ing, DJ'ing, breaking, and graffiti. Artists scheduled to appear include DJ Pam the Funkstress, Conscious Daughters, Deeandroid & Celskiii, Josie Stingray, Aima The Dreamer, Tendaroni Crew, Bodirock Culture, De La Femme, Slide, Dime, and Lucha E.S.P.

Titled Queendom: Fly Ladies Reppin The 4 Elements Of Hip Hop, this all ages show, which takes place at La Pena in Berkeley at 9pm tomorrow (Sat 3/13), is also a benefit for A Safe Place, which provides invaluable domestic violence services for women. Admission is just $10 and $8 for students. They are even giving out goodie bags at the show.

DJ Zita, along with Pam the Funkstress (of The Coup fame, who spun at Amoeba Berkeley's Record Store Day two years ago), will soon be celebrating the two year anniversary of their ever popular, female-run SF party Everlasting Bass. I was aware that DJ Zita had wanted to do an event like Queendom for some time, so yesterday I caught up with the hard working promoter/DJ, who will also be spinning at tomorrow's event, to ask her a bit more about this exciting new annual hip-hop women's event.

Amoeblog:
How did the idea for this event come about?

This Week At The New Beverly: March 12 - 18

Posted by phil blankenship, March 11, 2010 08:02pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our March / April calendar is now online!
www.newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday - Wednesday March 12 - 17


Exclusive LA Run of the NEW 35mm Print!

House
1977, Japan, 88 minutes
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0076162/
dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, starring Kimiko Ikegami, Kumiko Ohba, Yôko Minamida, Ai Matsubara, Miki Jinbo, Masayo Miyako
Watch The Trailer!

How to describe Nobuhiko Obayahshi's 1977 movie House? As a psychedelic ghost tale? A stream-of-consciousness bedtime story? An episode of Scooby Doo as directed by Dario Argento? Any of the above will do for this hallucinatory head trip about a schoolgirl who travels with six classmates to her ailing aunt's creaky country home, only to come face to face with evil spirits, bloodthirsty pianos, and a demonic housecat. Too absurd to be genuinely terrifying, yet too nightmarish to be merely comic, House seems like it was beamed to Earth from another planet. Or perhaps the mind of a child: the director fashioned the script after the eccentric musings of his eleven-year-old daughter, then employed all the tricks in his analog arsenal (mattes, animation, and collage) to make them a visually astonishing, raucous reality. Never before released in the United States, and a bona fide cult classic in the making, House is one of the most exciting genre discoveries in years.

Idiomatic Improv Rock Night In Oakland Friday with Shudder, Lost Planet, & the Ava Mendoza Quartet

Posted by Billyjam, March 11, 2010 02:07pm | Post a Comment
Ava Mendoza
Improvised rock music that doesn't adhere to any rules or normal rock music expectations (beyond whatever the musicians themselves feel like making at that moment) can be experienced tomorrow night (Friday, March 12th) firsthand at the Idiomatic Improv Rock night at 21 Grand in Oakland, CA. Shudder, Lost Planet, and The Ava Mendoza Quartet are all playing live in an all ages, affordable night of entertainment.

The opening act Shudder, who is substituting for rock band PG13, is described as "less idiomatic" than the other two bands, but most intriguing, nonetheless, with a lineup that includes the two reed players Phillip Greenlief and Kyle Bruckmann, guest guitarist John Shiurba, and electronic instrumentation by Lance Grabmiller. They are expected to start playing sometime shortly after the 8pm showtime.

At 9pm Lost Planet, who "improvises compositions using a vocabulary of idioms," will take to the stage. Their line-up includes (Amoeba) Marc Weinstein on drums, shoehorse emergingDavid Slusser on sax, keys & electronics, Len Paterson and Steve Clarke on guitars, and all four artists sharing bass duties. Lost Planets' members have been playing together for 27 years now under various names. In the early 1990's they achieved brief notoriety as Pluto, with the 1994 CD Shoehorse Emerging (Rastascan).

Keep on Music New Wave and '80s Reunion Party - The Vietnamese New Wave Revival

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 9, 2010 07:19pm | Post a Comment



Last November, Keep on Music threw a New Wave + ‘80s Reunion at Bleu in Westminster. This isn’t new wave in the sense that a lot of people use the term, but rather a mix of Italo, Eurodisco and other ‘80s dance music that notably found considerable popularity with Asian-Americans in the 1980s. I was only turned onto the scene four years ago, by Ngoc Nguyen, who is a Vietnamese New Wave super fan (especially of Sandra).

Flash forward to the present and near future: March 27th. On that day, Keep On Music’s having a second New Wave + ‘80s Reunion at the Can Asian Entertainment Bar in Garden Grove. Unlike last time, I won’t miss this one and neither should you! Luckily for us newbs and the uninitiated, some key figures of the new wave scene graciously agreed to sit down with me and answer some questions about the Asian/Vietnamese new wave scene for Eric's Blog

Little Boots Celebrates Stateside Release Of Her Debut Album Hands At Amoeba San Francisco Today

Posted by Billyjam, March 9, 2010 09:50am | Post a Comment
Little Boots - "Earthquake" (from the album Hands)

little boots

Blackpool, England artist Little Boots, who will be making a special in-store appearance and signing copies of her acclaimed brand new debut at Amoeba Music, San Francisco today at 6pm (Tuesday, March 9th), is a most promising electropop artist with a somewhat familiar yet new & unique sound. Already a star in her homeland, where her singles-heavy debut album Hands was released nine long months ago, this former member of Dead Disco saw her Warner Elektra album finally released Stateside last Tuesday (3/2).

Little Boots' sound is new while simultaneously rooted in electronic pop's past, with that past including the not too distant 1980's techno pop of such artists as Gary Numan / Tubeway Army and The Human League. Fittingly, Philip Oakley from the Human League appears on the early eighties sounding album track "Symmetry" -- a track that Amoeblogger Brad cites as one of the dozen track album's best songs. Traces of Kraftwerk surface in the fat synth opening of "Stuck On Repeat," a song that, once it kicks in, is somewhat reminiscent of Kylie Minogue.

.
Little Boots - "Symmetry" (feat. Philip Oakley)

Predictable but unfair comparisons will, and have already been made to Lady GaGa,Little Boots with whom Little Boots unarguably shares a knack for crafting a catchy dance pop tune with global appeal. Little Boots wore a GaGa-ish costume in concert in New York on last Tuesday at the Highline Ballroom that included a gold lame face mask. This penchant for highly dramatic clothing certainly doesn't help in distinguishing her from the omnipresent GaGa, but the UK artist born Victoria Christina Hesketh is different in sound.

Happy Birthday Gábor Szabó!!

Posted by Whitmore, March 8, 2010 09:22pm | Post a Comment
 
According to legend -- and we always print the myth around here -- while growing up in Budapest, the Hungarian born jazz legend Gabor Szabo was inspired to pick up the guitar after seeing a Roy Rogers singing cowboy feature. He started playing at about fourteen and at the age of twenty, on the eve of the anti-Communist uprising, he and his family escaped the Iron Curtain for sun saturated California.
 
After attending Berklee College (1958-60), he joined Chico Hamilton’s celebrated quintet featuring Charles Lloyd. Gabor Szabo would develop into one of the most original guitarists to emerge in the 1960s, crafting a singular and distinctive sound. From about 1966 on he would lead his own bands (that year alone he released four albums including the stellar Spellbinder and Jazz Raga -- with one of the coolest looking album covers ever printed!). Unlike most every jazz guitarist of the day, Szabo almost always played an acoustic guitar, specifically a Martin Dreadnought guitar, usually the D-45 or the D-285. I suspect Szabo, for the most part, was never taken as seriously as he would have liked in the jazz world, what with his mixing of jazz, commercial rock and pop, folk, Hungarian and gypsy music, it just didn’t fit the program. But Gabor Szabo was always the iconoclast. You can still hear his influence on modern guitarists today.
 
Szabo’s career was relatively brief. He died just short of his 46th birthday back in Budapest in 1982 from liver and kidney disease while on a visit there. Today would have been his 74th birthday. Happy birthday Gabor Szabo!





New Batch Of Collectible LPs Hit Amoeba Hollywood!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 8, 2010 09:31am | Post a Comment
We've recently done a huge overhaul of our walls so there's tons of fresh top shelf LPs. Jazz, 20th Century/Avant Garde, Indie, Punk, 60's Rock, Psych, Prog, World, Folk, Metal, Goth and more! All of the LPs pictured are either up for sale now or will hit the walls soon.

Oscars 2010 Results: meh.

Posted by Charles Reece, March 7, 2010 08:14pm | Post a Comment

58% Correct

The results were worse than I had predicted (Avatar for cinematography! Precious for best adapted screenplay!). Blue is for my predictions, red for what I got wrong:

Leading Actor


Jeff Bridges, Crazy Heart

Cinematography

Barry Ackroyd, The Hurt Locker  


Mauro Fiore, Avatar

Foreign Language Film

Ajami (Israel)


El Secreto de Sus Ojos (Argentina)

Sound Editing

Christopher Boyes and Gwendolyn Yates Whittle, Avatar    


Paul N.J. Ottosson, The Hurt Locker

Supporting Actor


Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds

Costume Design

Sparklehorse's Mark Linkous Commits Suicide

Posted by Billyjam, March 7, 2010 04:13pm | Post a Comment
mark linkous
Mark Linkous
of renowned alt rock act Sparklehorse committed suicide today (3/7) according to a statement from his family to Rolling Stone that was also published today on Sparklehorse's website. In the prepared statement Linkous' family said of the Virginia born singer/songwriter, "It is with great sadness that we share the news that our dear friend and family member Mark Linkous took his own life today. We are thankful for his time with us and will hold him forever in our hearts. May his journey be peaceful, happy and free. There's a heaven and there's a star for you."

According to another report by the New York Times, Linkous, who was 47, shot himself in the heart outside of a friend's home in Knoxville, Tenn and died instantly. Linkous famously "died' once before back in 1996, the year after Sparklehorse (which was basically a one man band) released the acclaimed debut Vivadixiesubmarinetransmissionplot when he was on tour supporting Radiohead. He then technically "died" for two minutes after ingesting a deadly mix of antidepressants and Valium. He was lucky to come back to life but was left in a wheelchair for six months before he finally recovered.

As Sparklehorse Linkous went on to release three more albums, including Good Morning Spider (1999), It's A Wonderful Life (2001), & Dreamt for Light Years in the Belly of a Mountain (2006). Reportedly Linkous was busy finishing up Sparklehorse album number five, a collaboration with Danger Mouse, to have been released this summer on Anti.

(In which we bid a tearful goodbye.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 7, 2010 01:06pm | Post a Comment
Today marks the final shift of one of my most favorite Amoebites of all time, the glamorous and enigmatic “Smithy.”


Dearly departed Smithy (artist's depiction)

Smithy is not her real name, though it is one of her nicknames, and that’s about as close to “the facts” as most of us are likely to get. Smithy shrouds herself in mystery, and even if all her acquaintances pooled their knowledge of her past, it would scarcely be enough information to provide a decent Wikipedia entry, to say nothing of a biography. I keep the snippets of personal detail that I’ve acquired in the past four years of working with her like a jealous secret; a precious baseball card that I never remove from its protective plastic.

I don’t even know what she’s going to be doing after she leaves Amoeba Music Hollywood. For all I know she’s gotten a job lion taming, apprenticing to a witch doctor, or going deep undercover for the CIA in Beijing. All seem possible; all would hold some amount of appeal for her.


See: Craigslist > job opportunties

One thing we, her co-workers, have been privy to is what she’s keen on in music and film. Even someone as secretive as Smithy has dorked out with the best of us music store geeks when the conversation’s turned to our product. This blog entry will be a brief exposé of some of Smithy’s pop culture paramours. In considering them, we may perhaps glean a little insight into this unknown soldier, but even if not, we’ll still get to hear some perfectly ginchy tunes.

First, and perhaps most importantly, we must present the character Maria from West Side Story as portrayed by Natalie Wood. In her, we find not only a woman who rather closely resembles Smithy physically, but emotes in perfect balance, a youthful effervescence, a pining for romance requited, a profound sense of familial duty, an awareness of the potential cruelty of life, a Latin American heritage, and a penchant for being surrounded by hella gay dudes. That Stephen Sondheim, her favorite composer of musical theatre, had a hand in creating the musical is important. That the story takes its cues from Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet bespeaks Smithy’s being an Anglophile. It’s really spot-on as a cinematic metaphor for our beloved subject.


The following is a sampling of the music that Smithy would often play while working at Amoeba. I always looked forward to her selections as being an extension of my own…






















…With this one exception. While I value extreme minimalism in classical music in theory, and certainly accept it as a valid form of art, I can happily work retail without having to hear this:


I might get into trouble for revealing this, but I wanna explore Smithy’s celebrity crushes. Personally, the men of cinema that make me swoon are pretty classic and predictable: John Gavin, Rock Hudson, Vince Edwards – these are the guys that’ll be invited to my orgy in the afterlife (along with you, dear reader, whose beauty surpasses all others).


See: Craigslist > m4m

Smithy’s taste in men runs, well… How shall I put this? She and I will never fight over a man – that’s for sure. Skinny, poised, old fashioned, and maybe a hint of doom – these are attributes that seem to make her giddy. I once jokingly told her that the best place for her to find a date would be in a tuberculosis ward in a hospital. She nodded thoughtfully, taking this more as sound advice than the biting funny I intended.

Here’s some eye candy for you, Smithy…




I’ve been sick with a head cold for a week now, and as a result, I have missed (rather cruelly) Smithy’s last week at Amoeba Music Hollywood, in lieu of sneezing, coughing, and watching way too much Chelsea Lately. I never got to awkwardly tell her, amidst the aisles of shoppers, how much I will miss her, how much she lit-up the jazz room where we resided, how happy I am for her that she’s moving on to bigger and better things, and how bloody awful this turn of events is for me. Los Angeles is a mean place to shop for friends, and she was the best value I’d yet found. She's designer label, all the way. Tonight I will toast her with a glass of our cocktail, Campari and soda with a twist.


Te amo, la Rosa Negro! El toro! El toro! El toro está en usted!


California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Chinatown

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 6, 2010 06:00pm | Post a Comment
FORGET ABOUT IT, JAKE


Rooftops of Chinatown



Cathay Manor (where I've wanted to party since moving to Los Angeles
A quiet street in Chinatown


Chinatown (洛杉磯唐人街) is Los Angeles neighborhood located just north of downtown. To vote for other neighborhoods, click here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here. To vote for Los Angeles County communities, click here.



Another Vinyl Confidential, 3.2 – The Odd Order of Oblong Boxes

Posted by Whitmore, March 6, 2010 01:32pm | Post a Comment
Cipher encoding/decoding, this is diddly squat, goose eggs, nothingness, zip, zilch -- kick it in the teeth, silence has passed on into legend for chrissakes, long may it live. Silence is as dead as a dodo. Noise reigns, its grip addles nothing except humanity, piece of mind and the marrow of a sun drenched life poolside, contemplating the big things: skin, the uniquely opposable thumb, nose hair and genitalia ... hooting, honking, howling, screeching, braying, farting, booming, crashing, whistling, whizzing, shrilling, hissing, warbling, gabbling, grunting and grinding augments the day as the noisy, nosey void advances like ashen weeds. Silence no longer had anything to prove so expired quietly, idealistically, never to be heard from again.                                          

The freaks come out at night - Bounce Queen Big Freedia visits L.A. and the sissies' strange path to the spotlight

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 5, 2010 06:00pm | Post a Comment
Tashi Condelee takes the stage whilst Big Freedia does her thang

Wednesday night I was mulling my options about what exciting way to spend my evening. Since my brother won't let me come to his house to play Battlefield 2 - Bad Company, I was weighing whether or not to go to the Support Your Local Actresses event (which I'd said I would but suddenly wasn't feeling), watch Departures or The Isle, or have a low-key game night. My friend Karen Lee offered a solitary vote for game night, but after another friend, Anne Kelson, offhandedly said, "There's some Nola thing going on at El Cid," I received a sudden jolt of energy. Of course I was intrigued. She told me someone named Big Freedia was performing. My Lenten abstinence of booze was thrown out the window (again).


             Big Freedia and Katey Red                             A fan modeling what may quite possibly be the sissiest shirt ever

Big Freedia (née Freddie Ross) is a New Orleans rapper from off Josephine in the 3rd Ward. About fifteen years ago, Freddie hooked up with a Melpomene resident and fellow Walter L Cohen student who called herself Katey Red. Freddie was a cheerleader and Katey a baton twirler. The two began rapping together as duo, Big Freddy and K-Reddy. Katey Red signed to Take Fo' and was the first openly gay rapper on the bounce scene. Big Freddy became Big Freedia and performed backup vocals and danced as part of Katey's posse. In 2000, Neil Strauss's article, "A Most Unlikely Star," appeared in The New York Times.


Despite the media exposure and the national popularity of New Orleans' Cash Money and No Limit, by 2005, bounce and its sissy off-shoot seemed like they were never really going to move beyond New Orleans in a big way. After Katrina displaced thousands of New Orleanians, the expatriates' beloved music seemingly began to crossover in Houston, where many had settled. I watched from afar with excitement and glee when Latino Houston musician Chingo Bling hooked up with 5th Ward Weebie and morphed Hotboy Ronald's bounce hit "Walk like Ronald" into "Walk like Cleto," but when, as Eric P. Poptone, I DJed what was falsely billed as a Katrina benefit (all the benefits went to the bar), I was angrily berated by a particular hipster-wannabe for, although undeniably "keeping it real," supposedly playing music that "no one is feeling" -- this despite grinning and grinding going on with the more down-to-earth visitors to the dance floor.


A couple of years later I wrote, "Sissy Rap - tell me what a sissy know" about the sissy scene for Eric's Blog. In August 2008, Sissy's premier historian, Alison Fensterstock wrote "Sissy Strut" and afterward offered me some helpful corrections and additional info. In September, XLR8R followed suit with "Sissy Bounce" which included a fashion spread. That year, Ben Ellman of New Orleanian hippie funk jam band Galactic collaboed with Katey Red. When Galactic went on tour, they took Freedia with them. Galactic's 2010 album was heavily indebted to the bounce and sissy scene, featuring contributions from Cheeky Blakk, Katey Red, Sissy Nobby and of course, Big Freedia. In 2009, the "mother-daughter" pair Big Freedia and Sissy Nobby performed in notoriously cutting edge Williamsburg, Brooklyn. There, a mere eighteen years after TT Tucker & DJ Irv cut the first bounce record, the trendsetting crowd was on board.



What, in this internet age, took so long? Are audiences finally tired of mainstream hip-hop spending the last twenty years mired in a cesspool of self-seriousness, stupidity-valorizing thug posturing and hideous, de-humanizing uniform of style-less, over-sized clothes? Did the miserable, newbie, proselytizing backpackers finally grow tired of delivering the same boring sermon about the elements of hip-hop to a crowd old enough to remember Dana Dane and Whodini?

Rusty Lazer - a man who knows his music

Naturally, after performing in the East Coast's most famous scenester enclave, Big Freedia and DJ Rusty Lazer came to Sunset Junction, a 500 foot stone's throw from Silver Lake, Williamburg's supposed West Coast franchise. I had heard a few mentions about how bounce was the latest "hipster" accessory but I was still surprised and delighted by the size and energy of the crowd. Rusty Lazer, from what I recall, played classics, including songs by the likes of Jubilee, Juvenile, Magnolia Shorty. To my surprise, someone called out a request for Josephine Johnny. My reserve worn down via gin and dancing, I randomly approached strangers curious about how they'd come to bounce. As a response, I was more than once treated to an unnecessary historical lecture about brown beats and triggaman by Sierra Nevada-drinking beardos. Others were just curious. A few didn't seem like they knew. Whatever, even if Queen Diva isn't likely on heavy rotation back at their cribs, almost everyone seemed to really enjoy themselves and it was refreshing to see a crowd largely made up of white Angelenos for once not standing stock still with their arms folded.



If you missed it, one of the next stops for Big Freedia a d Rusty Lazer is a bounce showcase at SXSW, where they're scheduled to play a bounce showcase with Jube, PNC, Ms. Tee, Magnolia Shorty, Katey Red and Vockah Redu. Anyone want to carpool?

 

Interview with Rock Photographer Alissa Anderson - Part 2

Posted by Miss Ess, March 5, 2010 03:13pm | Post a Comment

Here we continue the interview with San Francisco's own rock photographer Alissa Anderson! In this edition, aside from more chatting about Alissa's favorite moments in her artistic career, check out photos (some exclusive!) of artists including Joanna Newsom, Vashti Bunyan, Vetiver, CocoRosie, David Byrne, SIlver Jews, Beach House, Bert Jansch, Meg Baird, Devendra Banhart, Donovan, Little Wings and more! Please see Part 1 to catch up!





Joanna Newsom and Neal Morgan - Big Sur - March 28, 2009

Miss Ess: How did you come to photograph the Joanna Newsom show in Big Sur?

You were the only photographer allowed.

Alissa Anderson: I planned on taking pictures from the moment I found out about the show since I knew it was going to be such an intimate and historic occasion. I have shot Jo many times over the years, from her very first shows at the Hemlock, and I hadn’t seen her play in a long time. I’ve shot many times at the Fernwood so I knew what the situation would be like. I brought my Hasselblad and just shot a roll from my seat in the front. I didn’t want to be too distracting for Joanna or the band and it was extremely crowded; I was pretty squished up against the stage! Ironically, my favorite shot ended up being the one of her tuning.

New Electronic/House 12" at Amoeba Hollywood: Innervisions, Cadenza, Robag Wruhme, The Revenge and more...

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, March 5, 2010 12:56pm | Post a Comment


HENRIK SCHWARZ/AME/DIXON

A Critical Mass Live EP 12"
Innervisions

As a result of 2009's "A Critical Mass" tour, Innervisions release two tracks recreated from the recorded live material. The A-side is based on the former Henrik Schwarz hit "Chicago." This new, eerie, bleepy techno version has a touch of early M-Plant production and was recorded during the Flow Festival in Helsinki in August 2009. "Berlin-Karlsruhe Express" is an aquatic Drexciyan house inferno by Henrik Schwarz/Âme/Dixon, and was the highlight of every live show.









ROBAG WRUHME

Dreiklangkrapriolen 12"
Musik Krause (MKR 031)

Robag Wruhme returns toting three nuggets which are somewhere between gentle hardcore with a weakness for horns, and a warm coolness. Dark, complex and almost avant garde. For all intents and purposes, a Lindenberg with Kafka-esque posing on a steamer, turned in the direction of the Ziller Valley. All three have a frugal consumption of a mere 4 liters per 100km, and there is still a healthy acceleration here that is lively and quick.








MARCEL DETTMANN

Dettmann Remixed 12"
Ostgut (OSTGUT 033EP)

In anticipation of Marcel Dettmann's debut full-length, Ostgut Ton presents a remix package of four original tracks, courtesy of Norman Nodge and Wincent Kunth. From the very first bar of Norman Nodge's remix of "Shift," an urgent, pumping charge of fizzing electricity is let loose, letting the arrangement simply flow. More raw energy powers also are throughout his remix of "Unrest." Taking a recognizably metallic Dettmann-forged synth pattern, Nodge's frenetic yet respectfully withheld structure guides you sure and steady through the smokescreen.

Listen to Unrest (Norman Nodge Remix):


LULA CIRCUS
Blumenholz 12"
Acker (ACKER 017EP)

"To sound the bell for the slowly but constantly sprouting spring also in a musical respect, the crew from Acker called for support from the Mediterranean sceneries of Italy: The two operators of the Lula Circus have already pricked up the ears of lovers of flamboyant tech house tunes with their recent releases on Resopal. Matching the season, they are now back to send up the temperatures on dance floors again. 'Waiting For The Sun' to come impatiently, this tracks frisks along on a bouncy bass and prompts dreamy spring fever with breezy- warm panpipe sounds. After that, 'Tears And Ice' makes quite clear where it goes to already during the first bars: Straight ahead! Beyond whipping hi hats and cutting snare impacts, slowly but constantly a piano loop clears its path to the surface. Later on the smoky and outrageously casual rap of a lady adds on and prepares a really explosive departure. The panpipes from the A-side make a perfect meal for Mr. Mollono.bass and so the euphony, in which he launches himself into a remix on the other side of this vinyl, can clearly be heard. Besides his typical, extensive percussion repertoire, also his hypnotic style is unmistakable. Finally the 'Lipstick Gang' comes around in a crunchy and reduced manner, this time it's the rhythmically emphasized voice of a male lending this track a distinct easiness." Acker



MIRKO LOKO

Seventynine Remixes 12"
Cadenza (CADENZA 045EP)

Cadenza presents a special remix package of tracks from Mirko Loko's Seventynine, featuring Carl Craig and Ricardo Villalobos. Craig's remix of "Love Harmonic" stretches to nearly 12 minutes and, following a long, gradual build-up of rolling congas, trademark C2 sawtooth drones slice through a haze of strings. Villalobos' remix of "Takhtok" places the chanting children's choir of the original at center stage, framing them with a velvety curtain of fuzzy synthesizers and shirred, crumpled beats. This is Ricardo at his amniotic best.

Listen to Carl Craig's Love Harmonic remix:








MARCELLO NAPOLETANO

Chicago-Detroit-New York 12"
Quintessential (QUINTESSE 011EP)

Marcello Napoletano has made his name on the circuit: his first 12" and his awesome album on Mathematics show his love of analog instruments and old school house. These 4 tracks reference his early influences and his much-loved sound: Chicago - Detroit - New York! Quintessentials tracks are raw, but they have soul, and that's why Napoletano fits in with this label 100%.









THE REVENGE

Looking up to You 12"
Motor City Drum Ensemble (MCDE1204)

THE REVENGE loops a popular sample into a slow burner that maintains disco vibes while being a heads down house track. GROOVEMAN SPOT on the flip, offering a more trippy version with filters over the main synth & shuffled snares to skip along to.













MARK PRITCHARD

Elephant Dub 12"
Deep Medi MEDI025

This music veteran (JEDI KNIGHTS, HARMONIC 313, GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS, RELOAD, TROUBLEMAN) drops a thudding, dub heavy anthem in the making, while B-side "HEAVY AS STONE" utilizes a beautiful, soulful female vocal over a lush, abstract track pushing future garage sounds forward.

Listen to Elephant Dub:








TENSNAKE 

Coma 12"
Permanent Vacation (PERMVAC049)

This sampler incl. three exclusive tracks taken from the cd comp: "IF THIS IS HOUSE I WANT MY MONEY BACK," Burners "COMA CAT," "NEED YOUR LOVIN," and "GET IT RIGHT" are all on this house meets disco record. Plus a remix from 6TH BOROUGH PROJECT (CRAIG SMITH & THE REVENGE).

Listen to Coma:







GLIMPSE

If I Was Your Girl 12"
Crosstown Rebels (CRM 057EP)

Crosstown Rebels presents a taste of the sublime debut album from Glimpse. Spiced up with warm, luscious pads and delirious vocals, "If I Was Your Girl" reinvigorates Glimpse's current sound while skillfully imprinting his endearing signature. The original version will only see the light of day on the album, while this EP brings an alternative "Glimpse Beats" mix to the table. Simon Baker reworks the track into a melodic, piano-laden affair, with stabbing epic chords.






ELLEN ALLIEN - Pump 12" (BPC 209EP)

VA: MARCO RESSMANN - Remixed 12" (UY 031EP)

BOYS NOIZE - Transmission RMX Pt. 1 12" (BNR 041ER)

HUGO & MARCIN CZUBALA - Zoo Comunale 12" (MOBILEE 062EP)

ANJA SCHNEIDER - iThought 12" (MOBILEE 063EP)

MOTORCITYSOUL - Deliver Me Remixed 12" (SIMPLE 1046EP)

POPULETTE - Mommy/Daddy 12"

CHRISTIAN MARTIN - Ghosts 12”

ARCHITEQ - GREEN & GOLD DLP TIRK048LP

BEATSY COLLINS - RAY CHARLES RE-EDIT 7" DP007

JINDER - YOUTH BLOOD 12" TBRAD001

KOTEY EXTRA BAND & BOTTIN - HOT RING 12" BFK044

SORCERER - CHEMISE 12" TIRK057

BADAWAI - EL TOPO & DSTRY ALL PRFTS RMX 12" INDEX001

THE BUG - RUN (FEAT FLOWDAN) 12" SWAMP004

ERDEERSCHNITZEL - 4 MONTHS 12" STRIKE1

I.F.M - YES WE ARE EP 12" DPC028

SEAN BROSNAN - SATJAM 12" NEEDW003

M.R.E.A.M = Madlib Rules Everything Around Me + GURU, Graffiti, Weezy, etc. - Amoeba Music Hip-Hop Weekly Round Up: 03:05:10.

Posted by Billyjam, March 5, 2010 07:07am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 03:05:10

Madlib
1) Freeway & Jake One The Stimulus Package (Rhymesayers Entertainment)

2) The Last Electro Acoustic Space Jazz Percussion Ensemble Miles Away (Stones Throw)

3) Madlib Medicine Show #2, Flight To Brazil (Stones Throw)

4) Madlib Medicine Show #1, Before The Verdict featuring Guilty Simpson (Stones Throw)

5) Strong Arm Steady In Search of Stoney Jackson (Stones Throw)

Once again, the ever prolific Madlib and his ubiquitous label Stones Throw dominate the latest Amoeba Music Weekly Hio-Hop Chart. This week the hardworking producer/DJ/MC (born Otis Jackson, Jr.) is behind four of the five chart entries at the Berkeley Amoeba store (every chart entry but Freeway & Jake One's The Stimulus Package). Both the premiere edition of Madlib's ambitious twelve part, once-a-month, 2010 Madlib Medicine Show CD series and the second installment made the list. This series, which is actually through Stones Throw on Madlib's own imprint, Madlib Invazion, is being released approximately every four weeks, with the odd numbers in the series being original productions by Madlib and the even numbers being mixtapes. The first part featured Guilty Simpson and acted as a kind of prequel to his anticipated upcoming release, while the recently released second part, Madlib Medicine Show No. 2: Flight to Brazil, is a one hour, twenty-minute Madlib mix of three or four decades of Brazilian funk, psychedelic, prog-rock and jazz. The CD comes with an eight page Madlibbooklet which the folks at Stones Throw describe as "containing anonymous liner notes that we have yet to make complete sense of." This is a CD only release. Meanwhile, Strong Arm Steady's In Search of Stoney Jackson, which has been selling well at each Amoeba store since it was recently released, is another Madlib production, with guest appearances joining the SoCal act including Talib Kweli, J-Rocc, Guilty Simpson, Little Brother’s Phonte, Fashawn and Planet Asia. This is one of those albums that will restore your faith in hip-hop if it had ever faltered.

This Week At The New Beverly: Werner Herzog, Keith Coogan, Alfred Hitchcock & more!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 4, 2010 08:05pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our March calendar is now online!
www.newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday March 5 & 6


A double bill of Werner Herzog's newest films

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call - New Orleans
2009, USA, 122 minutes
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt1095217/
dir. Werner Herzog, starring Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes, Val Kilmer, Fairuza Balk, Xzibit, Tom Bower, Jennifer Coolidge, Brad Dourif
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:20 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Interview with Rock Photographer Alissa Anderson - Part 1

Posted by Miss Ess, March 4, 2010 05:40pm | Post a Comment


Devendra Banhart - Benicassim Festival - 2005

Alissa Anderson is one fabulous rock photographer! She has dedicated herself to chronicling the likes of Vetiver, Devendra Banhart, Joanna Newsom, Neil and Pegi Young, Michael Hurley, Vashti Bunyan, Papercuts, Conor Oberst, Espers, Lavender Diamond, CocoRosie, Tussle, Citay, and bunches of other musicians currently making the scene, taking candid live shots, as well as promotional stills and also shooting multiple album covers . She has born witness both here in San Francisco and across the world to one of the most vibrant and exciting music scenes ever, and has documented it all for our visual pleasure. I recently interviewed Alissa to learn more about her work, what inspires her, and her peak artistic moments. Because there are so many photos (some exclusive!) in this interview, there will be two parts. Part Two is right here!

In Part One, we discuss Alissa's beginnings as a photographer, her inspirations, and also the goings-on behind perhaps her most famous photo thus far: the cover for Devendra Banhart's Cripple Crow, plus much more! Read on!


Alissa Anderson - Northampton, MA - March 2001

Out this week 2/16 & 2/23...Xiu Xiu...Joanna Newsom...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 4, 2010 01:09pm | Post a Comment
It seems like Jamie Stewart had been putting out a new album every year... I am not complaining though! I love this man. But it is hard to keep up with everything he does. If he isn't releasing a brand new album then he is probably releasing a live album, a remix album, a collaboration of some sort, or an EP, or single, or 7". Sade should be ashamed of herself! How long did it take her to make her new album? 10 years. Xiu Xiu was just getting its start when the last Sade album came out. During those nearly 10 years, Xiu Xiu had released about 10 albums and 10 7"s. He has also put out a remix album, a couple of singles and EPs and a couple collaboration albums. Additionally, he took it one step further last year when he released a 12 disc/12 month music subscription service limited to only 50 super fans. The amazing thing about Jamie Stewart, the man behind Xiu Xiu, is that everything he puts out is good. I still have not been let down. Each new album and single is as good and brilliant as the last. He keeps putting out weird and experimental albums that are also somehow extremely accessible. Xiu Xiu is sort of like the experimental version of Morrissey. Just as dramatic and catchy. Just as well written and brilliant. I first became a fan of Xiu Xiu about 8 years ago when I had first moved to Los Angeles. I saw them for the first time at the Smell and was immediately a fan for life. I had never seen anything like Xiu Xiu and still haven't. He took all the things that I loved about pop music and new wave music, punk, indie rock and classical and glitch electronica and mixed them all up together. I was impressed and wanted more. Luckily for me, Jamie Stewart and Xiu Xiu have been very busy.

I was a big fan of the last Xiu Xiu album, Women As Lovers, but the new album, Dear God, I Hate Myself, is just as good. It just gets better the more that I listen to it. The stand out tracks for me are "This Too Shall Pass Away" and "Chocolate Makes You Happy." There are always a couple of songs on each album that I get obsessed with. Xiu Xiu is not for everyone, and I really don't think he wants to make albums for everybody. Xiu Xiu is an acquired taste for sure. He is dramatic and much of the music is experimental. Many genres are mixed up xiu xiu dear god i hate myselftogether to make the brilliance of Xiu Xiu, but at the same time he makes totally accessible pop music. It is the perfect combination for me. I like my pop music a bit experimental and weird and I like my experimental music more on the accessible side. I still want to be able to sing along. Xiu Xiu is also one of those bands where you want to try and figure out their lyrics to the songs. Some of the songs are not so obvious at first -- you actually have to sit down and do some research and read the lyrics. It is sort of like a scavenger hunt, finding the lyrics and then trying to figure out what they mean. Xiu Xiu has not failed me yet. I love this album just like the last. Can't wait for the next one. Maybe he can take on a box set of songs like The Magnetic Fields. I would love to hear Jamie Stewart's 69 songs about love or hate or anything!


Zak Wilson Discusses Guitar Pick Collecting And The New Amoeba Music Guitar Pick

Posted by Billyjam, March 4, 2010 07:15am | Post a Comment

The new, cool looking line of Amoeba Music guitar picks may be priced at just 50 cents per pick, but in the world of guitar pick collecting some avid collectors will pay many times that amount for a heavily desired pick. As reported by the Pick Collecting Quarterly about a month ago, one guitar pick collecting fanatic forked over $1063 in an eBay auction for a Kiss (circa 1974) black on white Ace Frehley / Pastore Music guitar pick. Yes, as any serious guitar player will tell you, guitar pick collecting can become AC/DCas much of an obsession as guitar playing itself.

Guitar picks, which are a type of plectrum designed for use on a guitar but often used to play other string instruments too, such as mandolin or banjo, come in all kinds of shapes, styles, and are made from numerous types of materials including plastic, rubber, felt, glass, tortoiseshell, and stone, and can range in price accordingly. Although picks have been around for centuries (early ones been made out of bone, shell, wood, metal, amber and other materials), it wasn't until the 1920's that they were mass produced. A relatively more recent phenomenon is the customized pick. Traditionally made by rock bands, with Rick Nelson of Cheap Trick been one of the first to famously toss out dozens of them during concerts, more recently entities such as Microsoft, MTV, Verizon, and Budweiser, have all emblazoned their names on guitar Metallica guitar pickpicks. Right now there are thousands upon thousands of customized guitar picks out there with legions of avid collectors following them.

Farewell to our Friend and Co-worker Lee Gordon

Posted by Amoebite, March 3, 2010 05:35pm | Post a Comment
Lee Gordon
1966 - 2010

Lee Gordon

A memorial service for Lee will be held at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery Chapel
on Sunday March 7, 2010 at 1pm.
____________________________________

We lost a good friend and a good man yesterday and we are all sad.

We will miss you, Lee.
Lee Gordon
The break room stories, your ENDLESS well of music knowledge and passion, your genuinely warm spirit and kindness that you brought every day.

We were lucky to have the time we had with you.

SO glad you and Joe came and celebrated this last FAT Tuesday with us. You left us with the echoes of Ernie K. Doe, Lee Dorsey, and the Meters...and your smile.

Lee Gordon---you were a man of many layers. From the ASTOUNDING performance as IGGY on the Amoebapalooza stage, to the warmth and kindness you showed all of us every day, to the customers who would wait two hours or more for you to start your shift---simply because "there's no one like Lee...." Most certainly there wasn't and there never will be.

Lee GordonLee Gordon

Here's to you....Lee Gordon. "Time to flip the record over...."

Vinyl Confidential, 3.1 – The Odd Order of Oblong Boxes

Posted by Whitmore, March 3, 2010 05:05pm | Post a Comment
It’s been a while since I’ve posted any art work from the ol’ 45 room, AKA Vinyl Shangri-La. So this month I’ll be spotlighting some of our finer art brut escapades, high jinks, larks, monkeyshines, roguery, romps, shenanigans and simple low art sagacity.
 
“Art used to be a game of nuts in May, children would go gathering words that had a final ring, then they would exude, shout out the verse, and dress it up in dolls' bootees, and the verse became a queen in order to die a little, and the queen became a sardine, and the children ran hither and yon, unseen.” Tristan Tzara
 
The Elvis collection, Elvis 1.0 and Elvis the Sequel ...

Amoeba Hollywood World Music Best Sellers For February 2010

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 3, 2010 04:21pm | Post a Comment

1. Charlotte Gainsbourg-IRM
2. Charlotte Gainsbourg-IRM (LP version)
3. Huun Huur Tu/ Carmen Rizzo - Eternal
4. Dengue Fever Presents: Electric Cambodia
5. Tinariwen - Imidiwan: Companions
6. Basseko KouyateI Speak Fula
7. V/A - Pomegranates (LP version)
8. Ali Faurka Toure/Toumani Diabete - Ali & Toumani
9. Mulatu Astatke - New York-Addis-London
10. Shakira - She Wolf

So far 2010 has been shaping up to be the year of the women. Amoeba’s three biggest releases this year have been from the likes of Sade, Joanna Newsom, and Charlotte Gainsbourg. Ms. Gainsbourg tops the Amoeba Hollywood World Music chart once again in February and shows no signs of slowing down. The LP version of IRM also landed the second spot. At number three was Huun Huur Tu from Tuva, who had an amazing instore performance back on February 7th (Super Bowl Sunday). I managed to catch Huun Huur Tu once again a few weeks later opening for Tinariwen at Royce Hall at UCLA. The two groups combined were three and a half hours of musical bliss. I hope that perhaps both these groups would consider going on the road together. Tinariwen’s Imidiwan: Companions was at number five in the charts, up a few notches from last month.

Two compilations that came out last month both featured a music scene that was thriving during a modernization era that ended with entry of a new regime. Pomegranates (number seven) was compiled by our own Amoeba Hollywood’s Mahssa Taghinia (whose mix CD Oyun Havasi! Volume 1 is still one of Amoeba Hollywood’s best sellers). Pomegranates is a collection of pop music from Iran before the Ayatollah Khomeini. It is a blend of Persian and Western culture that culminated in some of the best sixties and seventies pop, rock and psyche. Most of this music was lost for a period of time, as Khomeini banned the broadcasting of any music other than martial or religious on Iranian radio and television in July 1979. It’s a great collection of songs sung in Farsi about love, sex and longing that most of the world has never heard outside of Iran.

Electric Cambodia (number four) is a collection of Cambodian rock from the sixties and early seventies. The members of Dengue Fever put this compilation together from their collection of rare Cambodian cassettes. During the period most of this music was recorded, Cambodia was going through major modernization, which brought on an artistic renaissance that not only included music, but architecture, art and cinema. This period ended when the Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia in 1975. It was noted that most of the musicians included in this collection were killed during this period in the cleansing of Cambodia’s intellectuals and western sympathizers. However, the cassettes of the music from that era continued to be copied and their music lived on.

At number six is Basseko Kouyate's brilliant I Speak Fula.  The Malian musician will be performing at Amoeba Hollywood on Sunday March 21st at 7 pm. I would advise you not to miss it. Basseko Kouyate plays the Ngoni, which sounds like a mix of the banjo, guitar and Kora. To top it off, he jams on his instrument. Although I love the album, it will be his live show that will impress you. So don’t miss out!

Notice there aren't many Latin music releases in the top ten? That's because all the biggies are coming out in March. More on that later.

Dr. Seuss meets Philip K. Dick.

Posted by Whitmore, March 2, 2010 09:06pm | Post a Comment
Not only is March 2nd the 106th Birthday of Dr. Seuss but it is also the anniversary of the death of Philip K. Dick, who died in 1982. So why not combine the two? And that is what we have here below. Yes, this is a simple minded and profoundly idiotic, ill conceived attempt to combine almost every title written by a couple of the greatest writers of the 20th century, and why? I don't know. This is how I spend my days, blathering and dicking around, no wonder I get headaches ... anyway enjoy Dr. Seuss meets Philip K. Dick.
 
Gather yourselves together
Whether puttering about in a small land
Or playing hunches in bunches
With Yertle the Turtle and the Game-Players of Titan,
The eye in the sky playing Cat's Quizzer
And the Ganymede takeover shivers and cries,
While banging and clanging
The Vulcan's hammer is dangling, above
Daisy-Head Mayzie standing by.
Turning the wheel, Mary and the Giant,
No doubt slyly defiant,
Churns the broken bubble
Where the butter battle boils and toils into trouble.
The Seven Lady Godivas rides on beyond the Zebras
As for the man in the high castle,
He’s allergic and wheezes.
A streaking goat from the street speaks
“Do androids dream of electric sheep?”
And to think that I saw it all on Mulberry Street.
I hope I shall arrive here soon
To run a circus or a zoo
Say boo to the clans of the Alphane Moon 
Next door to Solla Sollew.
Oh, the places you'll go! And how! But will you please go now,
I know the crack in space lies beyond the Wub and that is how
The five hundred hats rub ol’Bartholomew Cubbins
In his stubby bathtub scrubbin’,
The eye of the Sibyl, liberal fun sizzles with a zap gun, stunning the sun,
And since the divine invasion has begun, I have but a question, just one.
Oh, say can you say wet pet, dry pet, your pet, my pet
The world Jones made is only a sublet
“But look how we got along after the bomb,”
he gets the tones of Jones, but once alone
“Flow my tears,” the Policeman said to the ducks in the pond,
“Say hey to the Lorax and Nick and the Glimmung,
And Bartholomew and the Oobleck.”
Tick tock never stops in a counter-clock world where the dark haired girl
Hops on Pop, and dances with the fox in socks on a little black box.
The Father-Thing sings, a great day for up!
And the cosmic puppets read with their eyes shut,
Did I ever tell you how lucky you are by the light of the stars?
I Can! You’re as variable as the Golden Man
Or Humpty Dumpty living in Oakland, with a folding fan,
Dining and wining on green eggs and ham, unteleport the man,
Or undo the minority report of Sam I am.
We can remember it, every bit of it
For you, Philip K. Dick and you Dr. Seuss
From wholesale robots, and androids with flutes
And Wockets in a pocket! And Grinch in Santa suits
Mechanical oddities and Dr. Futurity winning the solar lottery
Radio free Albemuth, valis, our friends from frolix, frolicking in the mix
 
The ABC’s of Dr. S and Mr. D
A is for A Scanner Darkly but only partly
B is for Birthdays to you and he, me and we
C is for a certain Cat in a hat, that’s a fact,
And D is for the Maze of Death, and quite a test,
A handful of darkness, oh what a mess, but you're only old once,
So let’s do lunch, bunches of lunches, munching,
Maybe even twice or thrice if you’re nice at night, okay!
Hey! We’ll throw a fishing pole into the cool,
of McElligot's Pool with Marvin K. Mooneys 
And Dr. Bloodmoney, who can moo, can you?
Here by the pool is where Horton heard a Who
We can wish for one fish, or two fish,
Lessons and confessions of a crap artist
How he pulled out a red fish, blue fish by the fist full,
And foolishly a ship full, filling a Martian time-slip and King's Stilts lists too,
Oh! The thinks you can think at will
Ubik and Sneetches and Thidwick, Big-Hearted Mooses
The thrill of the three stigmata of Palmer Eldritches
The man whose teeth were all exactly alike
He liked to ride bikes and race tikes on trikes
I can lick thirty tigers today he’d say
And why not, let’s yell hooray today for it's Diffendoofer’s Day.
Now wait for last year time out of joint, a rhyme about zoinks,
And a preserving machine’s mean and lean is moist and broke
Oh the short life of a bloke, Mister Brown he spoke
Who says he’s going down like a boat,
Oh well, what the hell, here’s to you and the days of Perky Pat
When he sat like a Cat in the Hat.
But wait on that, he and we will be back.

Korean film festival of Los Angeles - KOFFLA 2010

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 2, 2010 02:20pm | Post a Comment


I’m kind of embarrassed to admit it, but up until three months ago, the only Korean films and dramas I’d seen were 녹색 의자 (Green Chair), 미녀는 괴로워 (200 Pound Beauty) and 소울메이트 (Soulmate). I’d been given a grip of dramas by the good folks at MBC but I’d dutifully passed them along to my own soulmate’s mom, who’s a raging Korean drama addict.

Interview With Rob Swift About New Album The Architect (Ipecac)

Posted by Billyjam, March 1, 2010 11:45pm | Post a Comment
Rob Swift
Released last Tuesday, The Architect by DJ/producer Rob Swift (X-Men, X-Ecutioners, Ill Insanity) has been selling well at Amoeba Music. At the San Francisco store it charted at number three last week on the latest Top Five Chart. Put out by Mike Patton on his Ipecac Recordings, The Architect is the latest in a string of solo releases from the prolific turntable artist, who for this latest release constructed and modeled the album like a classical music composition.

In fact, The Architect is an ambitious project, even for an artist like Swift, who has made a career out of pushing the envelope with his innovative turntable-as-instrument recordings. The Architect, which he dedicated to his former X-Ecutioners band-mate Roc Raida, who died last year, is an excellent recording that raises the bar on turntablist/scratch albums.

I recently caught up with Rob Swift to ask him about the new album and how it came into being. "In June of 2008 I was in my bathroom shaving and my girlfriend, her name is Tess, walked into the bathroom and was like, 'I want you to listen to something. So she set up her iPod and little speakers and played a piece by Chopin for me. I forget what piece it was but I remember being blown away and been really touched and moved by this music I was listening to," he recalled. "So I finished shaving and came out of the bathroom and I was like, Tess you gotta play me more of that music. What is it? And she started to explain to me about classical music. And the funny thing is that all of us have been exposed to classical music at one time or another, whether in a movie or at Macy's in an elevator, or if you're watching commercials. So as much exposure as I have had to the genre of classical music, I don't think my mind and my heart was ready to accept it. But for some reason on that day in my bathroom, my heart was ready to embrace this genre."

Happy 200th Birthday Frédéric François Chopin

Posted by Whitmore, March 1, 2010 10:54pm | Post a Comment