Amoeblog

September 30, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, September 30, 2009 11:07pm | Post a Comment



It's Autumn, Therefore We Have The Covers Record

Posted by Miss Ess, September 30, 2009 05:37pm | Post a Comment

When the air turns a tad crisp and apples hang heavy on trees, that's when it's time to put on Cat Power's The Covers Record.


I know I am not the only person in the world who listens to certain records seasonally, and The Covers Record is all about autumn.


This one is a doozy for me. It instantly takes me back to the fall of 2000, my senior year in college, when the chill fall air was thick with the ache of unrequited love. I would wander around campus lost in the clouds with my walkman on, listening to Chan Marshall's inimitable voice softly crooning along to my nebulous thoughts.


Like any good record, it always kinda felt like she was singing just to me. It's a perfect, perfect album for that kind of dreaming while walking through redwoods when the earth is beginning turning cold -- spare, smoky, comfortingly melancholy but not without moments of joy.

In those days it was impossible to imagine that someday her music would be on a De Beers commercial or involved in any of her other recent cash-flow tactics. These were special, heady times, spent listening to "Sweedeedee" with summer's muted last gasp shining down.

Noblesse Oblige: 'Offensive Nonsense' Gets Reissue

Posted by Aaron Detroit, September 30, 2009 03:00pm | Post a Comment
Thank the fates for the explosion of deluxe edition reissues! While some serve as mere cash cows for record labels with unnecessary previously-unreleased-for-a-reason vault-raping bonus tracks for nerds, many give previously overlooked gems and obscure nuggets a proper introduction to music fans. Such is the case for the limited edition deluxe reissue of the Berlin-based Noblesse Oblige’s mischievous debut album. In 2006, the then London-based duo of German singer/songwriter/producer Sebastian Lee Philipp and French singer/songwriter Valerie Renay released a small-run of their debut LP entitled Privilege Entails Responsibility, via the obscure and now-defunct UK imprint Horseglue Records. The album of nighttime grooves and tri-lingual self-proclaimed ‘Offensive Nonsense’ slowly gained a cult following via hundreds of increasingly packed European live shows and steady word-of-mouth. The band eventually moved to Berlin and began work on what would become their well received, more accessible and quite excellent sophomore LP, 2008’s In Exile via Germany’s RepoRecords. On the heels of Exile’s success, Repo is reissuing Privilege this week with ten(!) bonus tracks including two brand new forward-moving tracks and padded out with eight additional remixes.

While In Exile explores the band’s love of dreamier and filmic music (which no doubt rubbed-off on queer indie-rockers The Hidden Cameras, whom Philipp worked with on tracks for their recent lush offering, Origin: Orphan), Privilege is an inviting and darkly comic (sometimes even knowingly ridiculous) yet misanthropic and intense ride via the Goth and Waver club dance floors of yester-year. Philipp pays homage to his fellow countrymen KMFDM on “Bite Back“ and “Bitch” with big cheese-rock riffs and tongue firmly planted in cheek while somehow remaining quite serious and sincere. “Fashion Fascism” sounds like it could be a cover of Madonna’s “Burning Up” on some obscure late-80’s Wax Trax 12 inch while Philipp invokes the spirit of Leigh Bowery on “Daddy (Don’t Touch Me There).” Sadly, the Minty-commissioned Noblesse Oblige cover/remix of Bowery’s “Useless Man,” which appeared as the b-side of N.O.’s single for the bouncy “Quel Genre de Garcon,” does not appear among the bonus tracks here.

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Negatives

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 30, 2009 10:50am | Post a Comment







Check out last year's negative gallery here.


AMOEBA SF HIP-HOP & SOUL SECTIONS WITH LUIS & DR. GOLDSTEIN

Posted by Billyjam, September 30, 2009 06:00am | Post a Comment

Last week, while visiting the San Francisco Amoeba Music store, standing in the hip-hop aisle gazing at its thousands upon thousands of vinyl and CD titles I found myself drooling in awe. The seemingly endless Amoeba Music San Franciscoselection is like an encyclopedia of hip-hop, which is what I mentioned to Luis (the store's hip-hop buyer), who offered to do a quick run-through video tour (above) of Amoeba SF's truly amazing hip-hop section for those who have not recently or ever visited the Haight Street store. This section offers the most comprehensive Bay Area rap selection (including tons of DVD titles) I have ever seen -- thanks in large part to Luis, who really knows and cares about the Bay's homegrown hip-hop flava.

One aisle over from hip-hop is the soul / r&b section and it is damn good, too, with an exhaustive selection of soul from the very latest back to the classics of bygone decades. In that section I ran into Dr. Goldstein of Free Gold Watch (the nearby Haight district store that makes some of Amoeba's T-shirts and was featured on the Amoeblog last week) and knowing his love for both soul and Amoeba I asked if he would do a quick run through tour of the Amoeba SF soul section. He obliged (video below) and made the very good point, especially in these MP3 happy days, about how when you buy a CD or record you are getting an artifact -- not to mention much higher quality audio.

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INTERVIEW WITH KAREN DERE OF THE GIANT PEACH

Posted by Billyjam, September 29, 2009 08:03am | Post a Comment
In 1999 the independent East Bay hip-hop-themed online company The Giant Peach was formed by Karen Dere with planning help from Stinke, whom she had worked closely with at the Hierogyphics' company (the pioneering Oakalnd hip-hop entity that was one of the very first to embrace the Internet in the mid 1990's -- years before most people even had an email address, nevermind a fully functional online Kid Robotdistribution outlet for indie hip-hop). Working at the Hieros' company for several years coupled with the previous years' experience and expertise she culled from her time as a DJ, etc. at KALX radio, Karen had gained enough insight and knowledge to launch The Giant Peach.

Initially created as "a means for independent labels (with an emphasis on hip hop) and artists to produce their own line of garments and distribute their products to the masses" -- as its mission statement lays out -- the Giant Peach (GP) has grown by leaps and bounds over the past decade but has still pretty much stuck to its initial plan of creating a bridge between artists/labels and fans and of exhaustively carrying the clothing lines of popular design artists and collectives, and always with an emphasis on those from the Bay Area.

Currently celebrating its ten year anniversary, the GP has a store within a store this month at TRUE in the Haight (near Amoeba SF), and, I am told, this will expand into October. Last week I stopped by the GP's product-packed East Bay warehouse/offices to talk to Karen about her company and capture on video (above) some of the cool items for sale on its website. I also followed up with a text interview (below) to cover some things we didn't get to in the video version.

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Get Your Medieval Rocks Off with Helena Espvall and Masaki Batoh's Overloaded Ark

Posted by Kells, September 29, 2009 08:00am | Post a Comment
 
The last time Helena Espvall (of Espers) and Masaki Batoh (of Ghost) got together to create an album the end result resembled the kind of sound-tapestry two people of like-minded musical musings might weave over an ocean of space and time. Their first record (self-titled on Drag City) generated a quiet excitement from those of us at Amoeba familiar with the "new folk" weirdness of Espers and the psych-rock wyrdness of Ghost and seemed a sound-marriage of sorts where faded-about-the-edges Scandinavian tunes and other haunting works, both borrowed and original, mingled freely on relic-esque instruments. Nothing there suggests the kind of epic, blast-from-the-distant-past sonic onslaught of Overloaded Ark, Espvall and Batoh's second release on Drag City and the latest source of a new take on a very, very old favorite song. 

Overloaded Ark's opening track, titled "Little Blue Dragon," is a better known by the name of the merry dance it was originally composed for way back in 14th century Naples: the saltarello. It is played in a very fast triple-meter and named after its leading leap-step, in Italian, saltare. Of course, the composer credit for this song goes to the ubiquitous Anoymous who rules the bulk of any Early Music bin selections, but a version of the song, aptly titled "Saltarello," was made famous by that eclectic, neoclassical Australian band better known as Dead Can Dance (and if you've ever been to a Renaissance Faire or a Goth gathering where "dark" world music fits the rotation then I'll bet you a flagon of mead you've heard it before). Another version of the song, performed by Corvus Corax --- an outrageously outfitted German band who champion medieval music and authentic instruments, seems to share the same vein Espvall and Batoh tapped to give their "Little Blue Dragon" life. Espvall and Batoh's take on the Black Death era romp pounds out a feverish pace with traditional instrumentation at the forefront and electrified psychedelic meanderings fleshing out the background. It's really the perfect sort of aural "pants-ing" I felt I needed as a listener expecting to hear an extension of Espvall and Batoh's past works, only to be blown away with their new attitude. 



Overall the album is an enjoyable melange that combines haunted, free-roaming rhythmic jaunts (very much in the style of Ghost -- see above), dense meditative journeys by caravan (on "Overloaded Ark" and "Until Tomorrow"), sweet Swedish folk sustains revisiting the daydream feeling of their previous effort ("Vem Kan Selga"), a classically beautiful yet brief cello interlude by Espvall ("Pro Peccatis Suae Gentis / Nun Fa"), a delicate, music box-like ditty sung in French whispers ("Tourdion") and a cover of a Silvio Rodriguez tune, "Sueño Con Serpientes" played with the same ethereal, not-your-mom's-folk-record tones that made me fall instantly for Espvall and Batoh's pairings in the past. On the final track, "Sham no Umi," both artists sing a repeated refrain in Japanese-- "yoake mae no umi made" ("until the ocean before the dawn") -- while warm waves of instrumental echoes in guitars, pianos, strings and electric rays seem to embrace them. Given that so much of this record seems as though it could be filed under "heavy" in more ways that one, I love that the last note it lingers on resonates hopefully. I feel uplifted by it and ultimately it makes me want to return to side A and start the voyage all over again. I predict that this'll be the among the witchy records playing while I assemble my Hallowe'en costume this year.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 10/02/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 28, 2009 03:30pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

break sl city wasteland


Break Sl
CITY WASTELAND PART 2 12"
PHP040 

Part 2 starts with "MOVE," true-school techno. "DIRTBOMB" has a raw, bluesy house feel, and on the flip are the Detroit influenced "WEIRD DANCER" and the vinyl exclusive "TFF," which delivers intense and acid-like drum layers. Chicago galore!



Falko Brocksieper
ADOBE EP 12"
CNTX35 

The first cut is downright mysterious...deep stacked chords play with your ears. "SOUTH EAST" follows a Detroit-ish motif as a pan flute pangs the air, keeping the high ends in focus. Slicked out tech house made from the man with a keen sense of what keeps us lost in a groove.  


Featurecast 
GRANDMASTER CAST EP 12" BIBB004

Various 
INTO BATTLE EP (FEATURECAST) 12" BOMBBAT1 

Aldo Vanucci 
BSTRD BOOTS #9 12" BJX009

Aquasky 
DEEP FAT FREQUENCIES EP #1 12" PASA051

Dark Phayd-R 
MADE YOU SHACK UP 7" BP7003

Deadmau5 
GHOSTS'N'STUFF 12" MAU5020T

Dre Skull 
I WANT YOU (BOK BOK RMX) 12" BOKBOK01

Falko Brocksieper 
ADOBE EP 12" CNTX35

Playdoe 
FREEZE STEP (STARKEY REMIX) 12" RWINA003  

Various 
BEAT DIMENSIONS VOL.2 #3 12" RH10912C    



New House/Disco 12"s Coming This Weekend:


Crazy P
CAUGHT UP (STILL GOING RMX) 12"
CRAZYP004 

The dub mix from STILL GOING is a superb example of the fusion of edgy disco and house that the DFA label has become known for, while founding band member CHRIS TODD (under his HOT TODDY guise) turns out a slow deep house remix that's much in demand! 
   



Ralph Und Beedle
MADE OF STARS 12"
OH009 

ASHLEY BEEDLE & MARK RALPH release more of their Munich-Disco/Krautrock inspired 12"s, with a tasteful nod to GIORGIO MORODER. Includes the dub and main Voyager mixes. DOPE DOPE DOPE. Cosmic disco fans NEED THIS ONE!
  


6ix Toys SISTERS OF SOUL REMIX 12" FW32

A Work In Progress 
UNTITLED EP 12" YRE018

Ashley Thomas 
A TALE OF 4 REMIXES EP 12" WAH12019

Brooksy & Twisted Bitz 
MOVE 12" F015

DC La Rue 
REWORKS VOL.1-PETE HERBERT 12" DCRW01

Darius Syrossian 
10 THOUSAND BRIDGES 12" BOA006

Disco Deviance 
#10 GW EDITS-DO IT 12" DD010

Einzelkind 
CANAL MORAL 12" KINDISCH027

Emerson Todd 
MY LITTLE FRIEND 12" WCIP001

Floating Points 
VACUUM EP 12" EGLO002

Jarle Brathen 
SODER 12" FP21

Joey Negro 
CAN'T GET HIGH WITHOUT U 12" ZEDD12112

John Shananigans 
MAN W/ONE BLUE SHOE 12" CCS040

Kai Alce 
POLYESTER STATIC-C.DAMIER 12" RS019

Lord Ward 
RICH BOYS (PIC DISC) 12" LWR1001

Phoreski 
PHORESKINZ VOL.3 12" BF04

Roland Appel 
NO MEMORY 12" MOVE3

Roy Davis Jr 
WE MUST HAVE BALANCE 12" LAR128

Sleazy McQueen 
A ROUGH GUIDE TO SLEAZY MCQUEEN 12" HC015

They Came From Stars 
RABBIT SEAL.. 12" TINAE024

Todd Sparrow 
EVENING STAR 12" FCL36

Various 
DESSOUS CLASSICS RMXS VOL.3 12" DESCLASSICS03

Various 
GET DAT SAMPLER 12" BH028

Various 
SOUNDS SUPERB VOL. 5 12" CRE025 
    



New Dubstep/Jungle 12"s Coming This Weekend:



Drums Of Death
GOT YR THING 12"
GREC06

HEFTY, DUBSIDED, MAD DECENT arena house music, fixed up in rowdy fashion by STARKEY's hype dubstep remix...and given the fidget treatment by JESSE ROSE and OLIVER $. Plus a slamming future-retro CAGE & AVIARY remix that has been destroying the more discerning dancefloors.



Skream
JUST BEING ME 12"
SSDUBSTARS021

Melodic, funky, and slightly melancholy, "JUST BEING ME" is a slight departure from SKREAM's usual fare. But don't fret, hardcore dubsteppers, cuz B-side "MUDERA" is straightforward wobble madness! 
   


Aardvarck BLOOM 03 12" BLOOM03

Deadmau5 
GHOSTS'N'STUFF-SUBFOCUS RMX 12" MAU5020TX
    

ANVIL! THE STORY OF ANVIL DIRECTOR SASCHA GERVASI INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, September 28, 2009 01:37pm | Post a Comment


The wonderful summer-long Amoeba's Monday Movies @ Space15Twenty in Hollywood (the weekly free outdoor screenings of music-related films curated by Amoeba Music) ends tonight with a screening of the highly recommended Anvil! The Story of Anvil. If you have to miss the screening, the DVD of this underdog story about endearing Canadian metal band Anvil comes out next week, October 6th, on DVD, and will be available at Amoeba Music. Last Monday evening there was another Amoeba-curated screening of the film up in the Bay Area at Elis Mile High Club

I just loved this film so much since it is totally unlike your typical, run of the mill music documentary. LA Weekly summed it up pretty well when they dubbed it "Hilarious and achingly touching." In fact, it is so touching and personal, yet always respectful of its subjects, the two lifelong metalhead buddies Robb Reiner and Steve "Lips" Kudlow, that you instantly connect and feel watching it that it has to have been made by someone whom the band members really, truly trusted and felt totally comfortable around.

Not surprisingly then, Sacha Gervasi, the director of the documentary, was once a roadie for the band. And for this riveting documentary he went out on the road again with Anvil, a band who looked all set to make it big in the 80's metal world but somehow never did. He's made a film that will remind you of Spinal Tap except that it is real, and more importantly, reverential. Last week I caught up with the film's director to ask him about this refreshingly unique music documentary. 
.
Amoeblog: I love your film, including how it flows so naturally and seems to have taken on a life or direction of its own. Did the film turn out differently than maybe what you had initially expected?

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"...And the hangover goes to...!"

Posted by Job O Brother, September 28, 2009 12:59pm | Post a Comment

Hello, Earthlings! I have returned after being ill for the past week. I’m still not at 100%, but can at least sit at my computer without succumbing to vertigo and mistaking my iTunes for an episode of Battlestar Gallactica.

It’s all the fault of the 2009 Emmy Awards. Yes it is! I’ll explain…


The boyfriend and I were (again) invited to attend the HBO Emmy Award after-party. As he considered which of his designer suits to don, I sifted through the post-punk, vintage mess that is my wardrobe, desperately trying to Frankenstein something passable to wear, grateful that most people at industry parties are too self-absorbed to notice me at all.

Once we got there we took our place in line in the underground garage that served as a holding tank for men and women dressed to the nines. (Front entrance was limited to red-carpet types.) Cramped into lines of two and everyone decked-out fancy, it looked as though we were about to be slaughtered in the most glamorous concentration camp ever.

We made it in.


Now, there’s a reason why I love going to the HBO after-party. Normally, I would eschew going to industry parties in favor of getting my fingernails torn out or having bedtimes stories read to me by Carol Channing. The HBO party is an exception to this rule because it is kind of awesome.

First off, the design is always impressive. Every year is themed. This year's theme was less obvious but no less magical. If I had to guess, it was some kind of meshing of the gardens of the Queen of Hearts from Alice’s Adventures Through the Looking Glass, the country of Japan, and vampires. The boyfriend noted that, since True Blood is one of HBO’s successes right now, the latter element makes sense.


As heavily made-up maidens danced with parasols on raised stages to harp and tabla transcriptions of chart-topping 80’s pop songs (Baroque renditions of Bon Jovi, anyone?) the boyfriend and I made our way through the mazes of Godiva chocolate bars and Blackberry-hypnotized publicists to the cocktails.

Which is where our story takes a turn for the worse.

The boyfriend opted to try the specially crafted house cocktail for the night, which was some – and please excuse me but there really is no better word for it – faggy concoction of fruit liqueurs and vodka which ended up tasting like Kool-Aid flavored with batteries, while I played it safe (oh, irony) and ordered a dirty martini.

Next we got in line for the food buffet where I jockeyed for rare slices of filet mignon against Sally Field who, turns out, is quite adept with a steel fork.

Our plates piled high, the boyfriend and I found an empty table near the temporary fountain where the plus-ones of celebrities like to smoke reefers.

Having been naively seduced into selecting food simply because it advertised “…with shaved truffles,” I tried tiny bites of many dishes, sadly learning that no amount of thinly-sliced Tuber melanosporum can save a scallop that’s been sitting on a hot-plate since 1994. What can I say? I’m the most adventurous foodie I know and am willing to give anything a shot, but there’s a reason why puréed broccoli laced with butterscotch and stuffed into candied shrimp with caper and unseeded-cotton sauce is rarely served.

As a result of the conceptually intriguing but ultimately unpalatable food, I ate next to nothing while continuing on with my second dirty martini of the evening, finding new appreciation for the delicious simplicity of a green olive.

You can see where this is going, right?

The boyfriend and I went on a walkabout, thrilling in brushing against a gorgeous and scowling Shirley MacLaine, or laughing with our friend Clark, who was a deer-in-headlights, being some eight yards from his celebrity crush, Sigourney Weaver, or appreciating David Cross giving the right-away to whomever in the thick people traffic as he held two drinks, dressed less for the Emmys and more for Tuesday night poker with the guys.

Amidst all this celebrity sighting, I made occasional stops at any of the plentiful open bars to order a new dirty martini until, without realizing it, I had consumed five of them.



Now, if you were to take the amount of booze in five martinis and put it into one glass and told me to drink it, I’d tell you you’re out of your [word that makes baby Jesus cry] mind, but apparently if you split that same alcohol into five separate, cone-shaped bowls placed upon stems above flat bases – hey, ho, let’s go!

I don’t remember leaving the party. I don’t remember getting home. I don’t remember carrying my cat around the house and showing him the tops of doors and explaining to the boyfriend, “He likes to see the tops of doors!” I don’t remember insisting on watching a documentary on Harriet Tubman, only to pass out on the sofa five minutes into it. I don’t remember the boyfriend having to literally push me up the stairs while I complained “Push harder! Faster!” I don’t remember sitting in front of the toilet and listening to Boudewijn de Groot


…and I don’t remember filling the toilet with slightly digested, dirty martinis with shaved truffles. I don’t remember being tucked into bed by my patient boyfriend and I don’t remember my last words being a whiny complaint that “people don’t use puppets to their full advantage… puppets could be so cool…!”

I don’t remember these things, but they happened, and I heard all about them the next afternoon when I woke-up.


Having obliterated my immune system with a flood of dry vermouth, it’s unsurprising that I caught a cold. And let me tell you kids, having a cold in the middle of an L.A. heat-wave is a stupid and gross affair. It’s not easy when your stomach wants chicken soup and all you can manage is a Diet Coke. I even called in sick that Thursday, so those of you who came to Amoeba Music Hollywood that day, hoping for helpful suggestions on which soundtracks would be best for your step-daughter’s bat mitzvah, I apologize.

It had been 15 years since I drank so much I puked, when my dear friend Sadie looked after me and made sure I didn’t die like Jimi Hendrix, a kindness for which I thanked her by drunkenly punching her face as she laid me to bed. (I will be apologizing to Sadie for the rest of my life for that.) Hopefully it will be at least that much time before I re-learn how un-sexy a thing it is to get alcohol poisoning.

Anyway, that’s the sordid truth behind my failure to blog the last week. But I’m back, I’m sober, and ready for more Amoeblog. Thank the gods.

Amoeba Hollywood's World Music Charts For September

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, September 28, 2009 12:24am | Post a Comment

1. Os Mutantes - Haih Or Amortecedor
2. Rodrigo Y Gabriela - 11:11
3. V/A - Panama! Vol.2
4. Nelly Furtado - Mi Plan
5. V/A - A Orillas Del Magdalena -- Coastal Cumbias From Colombia's Discos Fuentes (LP)
6. Mario Ortiz All Star Band - Mario Ortiz All Star Band Tributo 45 Aniversario
7. V/A - Black Rio Vol.2
8. V/A - Psicofasicos De Bolivia
9. V/A - Sound Of Wonder!
10. Ruben Blades - Cantares del Subdesarrollo

Fueled by a great instore performance, Os Mutantes' latest release, Haih Or Amortecedor tops Amoeba Hollywood’s World Music chart for September. Hot on its heels, though, was the latest by another group of former Amoeba instore performers, Rodrigo Y Gabriela. 11:11, Rod y Gaby’s new release, comes with a DVD of live performances and even some instructional footage for the up and coming Flamenco guitarist in you. Nelly Furtado's first all Spanish album, Mi Plan, is starting to pick up some steam as well, coming in at number four.

At number five is a vinyl only release from the Domino Sound label out of New Orleans entitled A Orillas Del Magdalena -- Coastal Cumbias From Colombia's Discos Fuentes. Domino Sounds goes a bit deeper in this compilation than Soundways' excellent Colombia! compilation (both labels licensed tracks from the Discos Fuentes catalog), adding personal favorites by the likes of Andres Landero and Nafer Duran. I highly recommend this LP for anyone who wants to know where the true roots of Cumbia come from.

Now that the new edition of Amoeba’s Music We Like guide is out, I expect to see some past releases making their way back to our top sellers list. In fact, the Panama! Vol. 2 compilation is a direct beneficiary of the Amoeba guide, moving back up to the number three slot. Don’t forget to pick up a copy of Music We Like, a guide to the Amoeba staff's favorite music and movies over the last six months. It’s free at every one of our stores, or you can read a short list of reviews online by going to Amoeba.com.

There were some surprises on the chart. Amoeba Hollywood shoppers once again went gaga over older South American rock music! The Psicofasicos De Bolivia compilation features 60’s garage and Psychedelic Rock mastered from the original seven-inch vinyl. Some may complain about the mastering, but hey, they don’t call it garage rock for nothing! Also, many Salsa music websites gave glowing reviews to the Mario Ortiz All Star Band, which had Salseros out in droves to get this new release. Salseros haven’t been this excited over a release since La Excelencia’s Mi Tumbao Social, which came out earlier this year.

Finally, at number ten is the latest by Ruben Blades. Earlier this month I got to speak with Ruben Blades about his album when he came into the store. Ruben decided to release his latest album, Cantares del Subdesarrollo, independently, after years of working with major labels. He spoke to me about the release and how proud he was of it. I have to say it’s a great album. It’s not for the dancers, but it is what you expect from Ruben Blades, lyrically rich and full of stories in a Cuban Son form. It is his first release in several years.

Still, what impressed me the most about him is that he was out in retail and hustling, asking staff what he could do to help sell the album -- this coming from a man who once ran for President of Panama (he lost), then was the Minister of Tourism of Panama from 2004-2009. He holds law degrees from the University of Panama and Harvard Law School. He has sold millions of albums worldwide and has won several Grammies, not to mention his a brief acting career! I know many local bands that just sit around waiting for opportunities to come to them. Ruben Blades could rest on his laurels, but there he was, asking me questions about how to sell his new album, which is what local bands should be asking me. Then again, this is the same man who left his career as a lawyer in Panama to work in the mailroom at Fania Records so he could be in the mix of the Salsa world. You've got to hand it to Ruben. In a world full of pretenders, he is the real deal!

The Tarantino Solution 3: Inglourious Basterds (2009), A Moral Defense

Posted by Charles Reece, September 27, 2009 11:06pm | Post a Comment
Page 2


Aryan Some Differences

While its propaganda might seem dated, Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin presents a critical alternative to heroism as traditionally depicted in most films, collective instead of individualistic. Along with a wishfullfilling counterfactual approach to history and a five act structure, Inglourious Basterds shares a similar approach to the heroic act, closer to the first 20 or so minutes of Saving Private Ryan than its remaining hour and a half. (I note that two early supporters of Eisenstein's film, who helped bring it to world attention, were Goebbels and -- as Tarantino has it -- his Hollywood role model, David O. Selznick.) Eisenstein's two most prominent characters, the sailors Vakulinchuk and Matyshenko, serve more as inspirational catalysts for the inchoate revolutionary spirit than a John Wayne (or even Tom Hanks) type who dominates narrative destiny through his will. As Bill Nichols suggests in his analysis of the film (in the book Film Analysis), the idea of a revolution begins to widen across each act:

One of Eisenstein's great achievements as a filmmaker is that he provided a model for a cinema of groups, crowds, and masses rather than individuals. In Battleship Potemkin he does so by telling the story of three distinct examples of political awakening over the course of five acts. [...] Each awakening broadens the political scope of the film, from the revolt of one ship's crew through the rising up of one town to the rebellion of the entire fleet. -- p. 163-4

Indeed, as he points out, Vakulinchuk dies in the second act and Matyshenko doesn't reappear until the fifth -- hardly the kind of heroism as charismatic leadership favored by a Leni Reifenstahl or George Lucas (the latter's well-known appropriation from the former receives a nice spoof here). No matter how seemingly innocuous the fantasy (from the Golden Age Superman, despite his defense of labor, to Star Wars), there's always a whiff of authoritarianism that accompanies this great man portrayal of heroism -- that a change for the betterment of all comes solely from the determination of a few. That is, follow those so privileged by God, genetics (Aryan, Kryptonian) or midi-chlorians, not morality per se.


Eli Roth satirizes this authoritarian subtext in his film within a film, Nation's Pride. Made by Goebbels (the diegetic one, not ours), the film depicts one lone private, Frederick Zoller, fighting off the nameless hordes with nothing but sheer will and an endless supply of ammo. He even manages to plant one in the eye of Eisenstein's peasant in montage (see above), only it's an American soldier and the intended audience of Nazis is expected to identify with the person doing the slaughtering, not the slaughtered -- an Audie Murphy film injected with Schwarzenegger's steroids. That he manages to rub out exactly 300 Americans evokes Zack Snyder's chiseled fable of fascistic glory where the same number of Spartans kill thousands of others much darker than themselves. All of which is reminiscent of the young Germanic Arminius kicking the Roman Varus' ass in the Teutoburg Forest back in the year of 9 A.D., an event that would become one of the founding myths of German nationalism. By Zoller's making an explicit analogy between himself and Sergeant York -- the titular sharpshooter in Howard Hawks' film played by Gary Cooper, an actor who shared the Nazis' hatred of pinkos -- it should become pretty clear that Inglourious Basterds has quite a bit to say, not only about other films, but about the transcontinental and trans-ideological appeal of this Triumph of the Will-styled heroism.


The deification of the heroic individual isn't so bad as long as he's doing the right thing. The problem, of course, is when he's the ideological correlate of the Other, as in Roth's propaganda film. But, even there, it's a problem with a clear solution: eliminate those who are foolish enough to follow false idols, namely your enemy. More difficult to suss out is one's own idolatrous identification with Horatio Alger's brand of determination. My Brecht is showing, but it's by getting the audience to identify with the hero rather than his actions that ideology can most easily slip in, as it discourages a critical distance from the narrative subject. Because of the reverence with which we tend to hold the abstract hero, it's a short slippery slope to a Holocaust film made with the best of intentions, yet which ultimately focuses our attention more on the moral awakening of the Aryan protagonist than the long, hard work of all the oppressed Jews who made his awakening and subsequent virtuous actions possible. I wouldn't say Schindler's List is immoral, but it does show how the Great Man approach tends to give credit to the charismatic at the expense of what was in reality a collective act. Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan demonstrates the difference in enunciation when he starts with collective action:


Only to settle into the more classical hero identification:


From a sacrifice en masse to another story of guys on a mission that revolves around the character arc of a leader who's a little more important than the rest. Well, who doesn't like guys on a mission? Spielberg gives a pretty good example, even though the ending makes my teeth ache and the generic storyline is a real let down after the best war scene in cinematic history. I bring it up by way of contrast with Tarantino's own take on the subgenre. Tarantino is too big a fan of Hawks' transparent style to ever be a full-fledged Brechtian, but he's imbibed a whole lot of Jean-Luc Godard. That is to say his style isn't the more classically oriented Spielberg's. Inglourious Basterds' long scenes of dialog require identification for the tension and comedy to work. However, when he anachronistically uses disco-era font to introduce Hugo Stiglitz or plays Bowie's "Cat People" over Shosanna's preparation for her big night with the Nazis, he creates some Brechtian critical distance. Most important is the way he de-centers the typical heroic narrative.

    

What some friends and critics found disappointing, I thought the film's strongest virtue, namely that the Basterds aren't in the film near as much as the title suggests. Unless, as in the posters above, all the anti-Nazis are included as de facto members. But that's not who you expect; you expect the guys not introduced until Chapter 2, Stiglitz and:


By the way, whatever happened to these two?


The Basterds proper only occur in 3 of the Chapters, taking a back seat in the 4th to the British film critic turned spy, Lt. Archie Hicox, and the German movie actress, Bridget von Hammersmark -- the latter being the one who devises the plan, Operation Kino, to assassinate the Nazi high command.


Given that the other major assassination plot is hatched by Shosanna independently of the titular heroes, Tarantino proves himself once again to be -- perhaps second only to Russ Meyer (an Eisensteinian, I might add) and Andrea Dworkin -- America's foremost emasculating feminist. 

       

The real kicker is the ironic success of these two plans, which is nothing less than a critique of heroic identification as it's so often implemented in war films and propaganda (virile and manly, the Nazis would say). Resulting from a violent mishap at the tavern where Hammersmark meets Hickox and the Basterds, Landa comes to discover Operation Kino. He strangles the actress, kidnaps the dashing, blue-eyed leader of the Basterds, Lt. Aldo Raine, but leaves the two Basterds with bombs strapped to their legs at the theater with all the Nazis. Sensing that his team is about lose the war irrespective of Operation Kino, Landa appeals to the Americans' utilitarian ethos by cutting a deal: he'll let the bombs go off, thereby ending the war a little sooner, if he gets to live out the rest of his life as a war hero on Nantucket Island, instead of the war criminal that he is. Thus the Clark Gable/Gary Cooper hero role played by the movie's big star, Brad Pitt, is morally reduced to sitting on the sidelines, brokering a deal with the narrative's most evil Nazi. Not quite "hooray for our boys."


Stick around for the startling conclusion ...

Budget transmissions from the heart of the New Hairy! Skygreen Leopards' Jehovah Surrender

Posted by Mark Beaver, September 26, 2009 06:45pm | Post a Comment

I know that many out there have found that any "milk of human kindness" that they may have had on reserve for all things "freak folk" has long soured. Granted, Devendra Banhart, the Jewelled Antler Collective and those that traipse along under similar standards are an inconsistent lot, and that may be part of the whole modus operandi. I mean, doesn't exactitude of key and clear direction and purpose of lyric and melody just end up being a stone drag...man?

I hear all of that criticism, and I get it. I picked up the recently issued 4CD Jewelled Antler Library box, and amongst all that dusty immediacy, birdsong and flecks of deep inspiration, there was some serious dreadfulness.

All that said, Skygreen Leopards, featuring JAC founders Glenn Donaldson (also of Blithe Sons and Thuja) and Donovan Quinn, have held to their own modus of trippy, immediate, flawed songs partially recorded in the open air and likely in one take. Just six songs here, none of them clocking in over four minutes, but all of it strangely, dreamily compelling. The vocals are troubled, the grooves are lazy and lethargic, but I will take it over anything by Bevis Frond in a hot minute, because it's all of a piece. Everything refers to everything else, the vocals are sung like the guitar is strummed like the drums are brushed...as if it's all good, Brother Bear, and it's ok to just sway in place and turn your face, flower-like, towards the sun.

It's not a piss-take, folks. These guys believe their hype and I know that there are those who might read this, pick up this little nugget and absolutely hate me for it, but I think that this is one of those creepy, honestly misguided gems that 20 years down the road is going to blow people's minds like rediscovered wierdo gems from the 70's like:

Ed Askew's
Little Eyes (1971):
or Bobby Brown's Enlightening Beam of Axonda (1972).




Hispanic Heritage Month - Latinos in American Cinema

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 26, 2009 01:51pm | Post a Comment

Aside from a brief fetish for Latin Lovers in the silent era, roles for Hispanics and Latinos in American silent film were few, far between and generally quite minor. In the sound era, images of Hispanics and Latinos in Hollywood began to increase in number, although Latino characters were at first usually portrayed by non-Latinos in brownface whilst real Latinos were frequently used as all-purpose ethnic types.

 
          Ramon Novarro and Lupe Velez (as Navaho) in Laughing Boy                                Leo Carrillo and Duncan Renaldo

1930s-
In the first decade of sound, there weren't many roles for Hispanics or Latinos aside from in popular, long-running series like Zorro, The Cisco Kid and The Mexican Spitfire series, the latter a vehicle for Lupe Velez. Pedro Armendáriz mostly starred in Mexican films; when cast in American ones, he invariably had to exaggerate his accent sufficiently. Throughout the '30s and the following decade, Arizona-born Chris Pin-Martin appeared in almost eighty films, invariably as a heavily-accented, broken English-speaking Mexican in small roles and as sidekicks, like Pancho in the Cisco Kid movies and as Gordito in the Zorro series. The Zorro franchise, begun in the 20s, continued to be popular throughout the era. The Cisco Kid series dated back to the teens. In them, unlike with Zorro, Hispanic actors like Leo Carrillo, Duncan Ronaldo and Cesar Romero were usually cast in the lead. Hispanic actress Rita Hayworth (born Margarita Cansino) was initially billed as Rita Cansino in a series of unrelated B-movies. In them, she usually played a variation on the fiery Mexican maiden in need of an honorable Anglo's protection and love.

Continue reading...

BERKELEY VIDEO & FILM FESTIVAL - DAN K HARVEST INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, September 26, 2009 10:50am | Post a Comment

This weekend the Berkeley Video & Film Festival is happening at the Landmark Shattuck Cinemas with a concentration on short films/videos typically of about ten minutes in length. At opening night last night of the eighteen year old festival, Dan K Harvest was at the downtown Berkeley cinema and got to view a dozen of these shorts. "It was invigorating, with lots of dark, foreboding, futuristic doomsday themed films Dan K. Harvestand a lot of relationship commentary," he said. In addition to about 15 local productions, there are also many entries from around the US and overseas, including challenging new independent cinema from Italy, Cuba, Germany, Venezuela, and Great Britain.
 
"There was even a film by a 12 year old that was fascinating," said Harvest. Today, the second and final day of the fest, at 6:30pm, Dan K will be featured in the ten minute Escapin' From Oakland. Earlier this week, while still at the Interbike Convention in Las Vegas, I caught up with the longtime Oakland renaissance man, whose illustrious career has included being a rap recording artist, a BMX bike champ, and almost a reality TV star, among many other things (a few years back he was featured in an East Bay Express cover story), to ask him about the festival, the film, and himself. Never one stuck for words, Dan K responded in detail via his iPhone.


Amoeblog: What would you say is your greatest accomplishment in life?

Continue reading...

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP 09:25:09 (VIDEO VERSION)

Posted by Billyjam, September 25, 2009 07:01pm | Post a Comment


Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Weekly Top Ten c/o Luis: 09:25:09
brother ali

1) Brother Ali Us (Rhymesayers)

2) Andy Allo UnFresh (Allo Records)

3)  Peanut Butter Wolf 45 Live (Stones Throw)

4) John Forte StyleFREEThe EP (Theory 7)

5) V/A Definitive Jux Presents 4 (Def Jux)

6) Blue Scholars Bayani Redux (Duck Down)

7) Trick Daddy Finally Famous: Born a Thug, Still a Thug (Dunk Ryder Records)

8) Lil Boosie Superbad:lil boosie The Return of Boosie Bad Azz (Asylum Records)

9) Cage Movies for the Blind (High Times Records)

10) Beastie Boys Hello Nasty (Capitol)

Super special thanks to the ever knowledgable Luis @ the hip-hop department of Amoeba Music San Francisco for always being so down to supply the Amoeblog with up to the moment news on what's popping at the SF store, new music- wise. For the second week in a row Luis has provided us with a Top Ten due to the wealth of releases (both new and reissues) dropping recently. Above you can see the chart in video and text forms, while below are a series of videos by several of the artists in this latest Top Ten chart.

Continue reading...

Where The Action Is! Los Angeles Nuggets Release Party

Posted by Amoebite, September 25, 2009 05:41pm | Post a Comment
We celebrated the release of Rhino's new box set Los Angeles Nuggets: Where the Action Is! with an in-store performance and signing at Amoeba Hollywood on September 22, 2009 featuring a number of the acts from the box set, including: Jackie DeShannon, Keith Allison, Danny Hutton, The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, The Standells, and P.F. Sloan! Compilation co-producer Andrew Sandoval was also there, spinning garage, sunshine pop, and singer-songwriter gems from the box set.

PF Sloan


Prolific LA songwriter (and performer in his own right) P.F. Sloan delivers his box set inclusion "Halloween Mary"...Sloan had his biggest hits with "Secret Agent Man" by Johnny Rivers and "Eve of Destruction" by Barry McGuire...his backing band included locals the Wondermints.




Wondermints Guitar








Wondermints guitarist wields his minty fresh axe.

Fantastic Baggys



P.F. Sloan (2nd left) penned hundreds of songs and performed in many guises...this album, put together with longtime associate Steve Barri (2nd right) is an amazing simulation of circa '64 Beach Boys...the song "Surfin' Craze" was featured in an episode of the Flintstones. 

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This Week at the New Bev September 25 - October 3

Posted by phil blankenship, September 25, 2009 10:54am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our full October calendar is online at
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday September 25 & 26

Recently made prints of Louis Malle classics

Au Revoir Les Enfants

1987, France / West Germany, 104 minutes
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0092593/
dir. Louis Malle, starring Gaspard Manesse, Raphael Fejtö, Francine Racette, Stanislas Carré de Malberg
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 2:15 & 7:00, Watch The Trailer!

Call Me

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 23, 2009 09:40pm | Post a Comment







 
 

FREE GOLD WATCH'S MATT & DR. GOLDSTEIN'S AMOEBLOG INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, September 23, 2009 05:45pm | Post a Comment
                                  Free Gold Watch's Matt & Dr Goldstein's Amoeblog interview

If you attended this year's wonderful East Bay Express Best of the East Bay Party at the Oakland Museum of California last month and stopped by the series of Amoeba MusiFree Gold Watchc info & merch booths, you would have no doubt seen the crew from Free Gold Watch busy operating their manual hand-operated silkscreening press, making various Amoeba Music T-shirts right there on the spot. It was a cool set up and all the more impressive considering that it was the first time that the guys from the San Francisco clothing design company had ever taken the large machine out of their hand-operated press. Free Gold Watch custom make other folks' designs on T-shirts, sweatshirts, baby size outfits and more, in addition to creating their own designs.
 
I had heard a bit about Free Gold Watch here and there, including from the folks over at the Giant Peach, who distribute some of their designs but I really didn't know too much about this up-and-coming Bay Area company, so, impressed by their work and also by what cool, down-to-earth, genuinely nice people they are, I decided to follow up and find out a little bit more about this Free Gold Watch.

New Nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Posted by Whitmore, September 23, 2009 03:51pm | Post a Comment

Twelve nominees
were announced this morning for induction onto the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame located in Cleveland, Ohio. Among this year's possible entrants are first time nominees KISS, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Genesis, the Hollies, LL Cool J and Jimmy Cliff; they join returning candidates ABBA, the Chantels, Darlene Love, Laura Nyro, the Stooges and Donna Summer.

Five of the 12
nominees will be chosen for induction from ballots cast by more than 500 music industry voters. An announcement of the inductees is expected sometime in January. The annual event will take place March 15, 2010 at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City and a huge celebration is expected for this, the Hall's 25th Annual Induction Ceremony.
 
Coming this Oct. 29-30 at New York's Madison Square Garden, the Hall of Fame is celebrating its 25th anniversary with an astounding concert and lineup, which includes Bruce Springsteen, Simon & Garfunkel, Stevie Wonder, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Friends, Eric Clapton, Aretha Franklin, Metallica and U2. More artists are expected to be named for this two night shindig. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is also releasing a nine-DVD boxed set, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Live, and the publication of a book, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: The First 25 Years.

Elephant Appreciation Day

Posted by Whitmore, September 22, 2009 07:40pm | Post a Comment

Here we are again, celebrating yet another odd and perhaps, on the surface, ridiculous holiday that most people don't even know exists. September 22 is Elephant Appreciation Day. I know it sounds like an internet hoax but it's a real holiday, more or less.

Back in 1996, September 22 was declared Elephant Appreciation Day by Mission Media, a graphics and publishing firm who got the day included in Chase's Calendar of Events, making the holiday, I guess, official. Mission Media says elephants deserve a day of their own because they are the largest land mammal of our era and are undeservedly threatened with extinction. Sounds good to me, I’m just a bit surprised they didn’t pick a more endangered species like the Alabama Cave Shrimp, the Camiguin Forest Mouse or the Ethiopian Banana Frog. How about the Asian Small-clawed Otter Appreciation Day?
 
So of course one of the first questions posed to me when I mentioned this over breakfast, “how do you celebrate Elephant Appreciation Day?” Take a trip to the zoo, look at the elephants? Drink Carlsberg Elephant malt liquor? Plan ahead and take an African safari on Elephant Appreciation Day? What can children do to celebrate? For the most part, I haven’t a clue.
 
But for the kids, I suggest baking a cake in the shape of an elephant, or if you parents are short on time make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich cut out to look like an elephant. Maybe have the kids draw or paint elephant pictures and look up interesting elephant facts. Did you know, for example, elephants can live for up to 70 years? They walk about 4 mph but can run for short distances up to about 30 mph. Elephants are able to swim for long distances. They spend about 16 hours a day eating, consuming almost 500 pounds of food per day. Elephant's eyes are small and their eyesight is poor but they have the largest brains in the animal kingdom. One more thing, adult African elephants, the ones with the big ears, weigh about 15,400 pounds, whereas the Adult Indian elephants, small ears, weigh a mere 11,000 pounds.

Of course the elephant is the symbol of the Republican Party. Not my thing, needless to say. Of course, this is the point I often write some snarky tea-bagging remark, but these are dangerous times, too dangerous for tea. So here are some delicious cocktails to help save the day, and perhaps our nation, on this holiday.

Pink Elephant Cocktail
 
Ingredients
1 part white cranberry juice
1 part berry vodka
1/2 part raspberry liqueur (recommended: Chambord)
1/2 part Limoncello
 
Directions: Fill a shaker full of ice, add all ingredients. Shake well and pour into chilled martini glasses, sit and relax.
 
Elephant Lips
 
1 1/2 oz. Dark Rum
1/2 oz. Creme de Banana
1/2 oz. Lemon Juice
 
In a shaker half-filled with ice cubes, combine all of the ingredients. Shake well. Strain into a cocktail glass. Repeat as often as necessary.
 
As for a snack:
Fried Elephant Garlic Chips
 
6 cups canola oil, for deep frying
1 cup very thinly sliced elephant garlic cloves (about 1/8-inch slivers)
4 rosemary branches
Salt
 
For the Fried Garlic: In a heavy 2-quart pot, heat the oil to 350 degrees F over medium heat. Carefully skewer some of the sliced garlic onto the rosemary skewers. Carefully add the garlic-rosemary skewers to the hot oil and fry until golden brown and crisp, about 45 seconds. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Season with salt to taste. Pour another cocktail.

The Big Pink and A Place To Bury Strangers Heart Feedback

Posted by Aaron Detroit, September 22, 2009 05:00pm | Post a Comment
If the gentlemen of London’s The Big Pink and New York’s A Place To Bury Strangers are to have their way this fall – you will have a serious case of tinnitus by Winter Solstice via their dark-veined noise-pop. Both bands love the volume loud, worship at the alters of 80’s Gloom-Pop and early-‘90’s Shoegaze, and both have new releases out in the next month. While both bands paint with Kevin Shields’s and Daniel Ash’s brush-strokes each band shades their canvas quite differently and uniquely.

The Big Pink signed to cult-label 4AD this year. The team-up couldn’t have been a better fit as the duo’s tunes could slide in nicely in a playlist alongside tracks from the label’s 80’s and 90’s roster of ethereal and gothic-leaning releases. They also share with their predecessors a keen eye and love
for packaging their music -– a dying art form for sure --adding dimensions to the music and an additional keyhole into the universe the band has created within their sound. The band’s pre-4AD releases of dead-sexy lo-fi electro vs. feedback bliss-outs were accompanied by homoerotic and ethereal sleeve artwork by Dennis Cooper (The duo also borrowed the title for their song “Frisk” from Cooper). The band’s newly polished, less-amorphous and refined sound (courtesy of major league mixing-czar Rich Costey) featured on their debut LP, A Brief History of Love, is issued with a murky, blurred and slightly unsettling cover photo of a bare-chested woman - insinuating and helping inject a similarly subversive sexual tone of their indie releases into the hazy pools of stoned reverb and romantic wistful grooves of the new album.

There has been some debate amongst critics and fans about the band’s credibility and authenticity due to the band’s big-time connections; Singer Robbie Furze is a former paramour of Lily Allen and spent time playing guitar for Digital Hardcore Founder, Alec Empire. Milo Cordell (who plays everything Furze doesn’t) comes from a music biz family. Cordell’s Father is Producer Denny Cordell, most famous for producing Moody Blues’s first album and Procol Harum’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale.” Also, prior to establishing The Big Pink, Cordell founded the label Merok Records, which released some of the earliest rumblings by hipster magnates Klaxons and Crystal Castles. Ultimately, the band delivers fully on the promise of their stellar pre-album singles and one would be best served to ignore the members’ pedigree and associations for one true, full spin of the LP, a wonderfully rewarding listening experience, especially for fans of the “classic” 4AD-era.


Brooklynites A Place To Bury Strangers’ approach to their Shoegaze-y Pop Psychedelia is much more aggressive, in-the-red and less doped-out than Big Pink’s turn. APTBS release an outstanding follow up to their most excellent self-titled debut next month. Exploding Head, their first full-length for Mute, has a justified title as it is a taut set of 10 high-strung sonic assaults and dripping-wet-in-a-cave songs in just under 43 minutes. The band can shift seamlessly between intense “You Made Me Realise”-esque moments to murky JAMC slink and jangly New Order-informed pop. The track “Everything Always Goes Wrong” creates a sinister and menacing atmosphere that evokes a lo-fi but melodic Death Rock or Black Metal song played by a fired-up Spacemen 3, all before serving up a bouncing Cure bass line for the title track. APTBS also share the “whole-package” approach with Big Pink; Exploding Head’s cover art looks like a pixilated aerial scan of terra firma busting apart. The minimal image’s suggestion plays well with the ear-scorch of the band’s relentless attack. Unlike The Big Pink, there is no controversy about the APTBS’s legitimacy. Mainman Oliver Ackerman spent time in a Virginia-based neo-Shoegazer band called Skywave
with a small but loyal cult-following (whose other members went on to form the similarly noisy and wonderful Ceremony) and spends his down-time from APTBS selling his increasingly successful line of hand-wired effects pedals, Death By Audio.


The Big Pink’s A Brief History of Love is in stores today (9/22) and A Place To Bury Strangers’ Expoding Head follows in two weeks on October 6th. Be Sure to pop in to Amoeba Hollywood for the limited vinyl edition of Brief History which boasts a bonus colored 12” featuring the Gang Gang Dance remix of Big Pink’s gorgeous single, “Velvet.” These will likely go fast!


Amoeba Hollywood’s Goth/Industrial Section Featured New Releases Week of 9/22:


Spectre -
10 Pezzi Facili (Ten Easy Tunes) CD [Old Europa Cafe] .
The second solo album from Marcello Fraioli, vocalist and guitarist for cult ritual/folk outfit  AIN SOPH. Minimal orchestrations of prog , folk, new wave, Italian cabaret, and poetry collide on this tight set. Includes one Ain Soph reinterpretation plus cool covers of Franco Battiato's "Magick Shop," Francesco Guccini's "L'Avvelenata", as well as John Barry's "The Persuaders." Recommended.

Habitat -
Code Grey CD [Self-Released]
A higly recommended, extremely limited release of 100(!) copies by L.A. dark and esoteric noisemeisters/soundscapists, Habitat. Fans of Coil and Cyclobe should jump at this gorgeous sophomore release from one of Los Angeles's most promising and unique acts!


In Next Week, Amoeba Hollywood:

The long-awaited archival release from the seminal beginnings of Throbbing Gristle members Genisis P-Orridge and Cosey Fanni Tutti will FINALLY be in stock by next week!

Clan Of Xymox -Emily CDEP [Metropolis]
The classic dark-wave band celebrates its 25th anniversary with this CDEP featuring an exclusive B-Side and remixes of the the group's club hit "Emily" culled from their 2009 comeback album In Love We Trust.


Still Fresh...


Psyclon Nine - We The Fallen CD [Metropolis] The Aggro-Electro act returns its darkest, most aggressive album to date. EVIL!

My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult - Death Threat CD [Sleazebox]
Still dark n' sleazy after all these years! Thrill Kill Kult's 13th studio release!

6Comm - Like Stukas Angels Fall: Retrospect 1984 -1990 CD [Kenaz]
Re-recorded album of classic tracks featuring songs from the early 6Comm period and also a few tracks from his previous work in Death in June. Electro - Folk - Classical - Martial - Experimental -- 16 great songs, including new versions of "Torture Garden" and "Carousel" with new vocal sections. Nice gold foil blocked Digipak!

Jessie Evans - Is It Fire? LIMITED LP/CD [Fantomette]
Former Subtonix/The Vanishing/Autonervous member finally goes solo. Features appearances by Budgie (Siouxsie & The Banshees, The Creatures) and Toby Dammit (Swans, Iggy Pop).


Joseph Zito Double Tonight (Tues) @ The Cinefamily

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 22, 2009 01:00am | Post a Comment
The Infamous director Joseph  Zito is hosting a double feature of two of his best films tonight! Many people know him from directing Chuck Norris in the legendary films Missing In Action & Invasion USA, but he also turned out some really tough grindhouse stuff. I put his Bloodrage up there with Forced Entry, but that's just the kind of guy I am. Sorry kiddies, I'm not showing clips from either of those classicks. However, The Prowler is up there on the greatest slasher films of all time list, and Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter is often cited as the best in that series, so fans of the genre need to make the effort to get down to the Silent Movie Theatre tonight! Having just watched Lawrence Tierney strut his stuff in Born To Kill (1947), I'm very curious to see The Prowler again, as I had no idea who he was back in the 90's when I saw it on bootleg VHS.


The Prowler
Trailer

 

Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter Trailer


Invasion USA Trailer


A menacing Lawrence Tierney in Born To Kill

Guiding Light 1937 – 2009

Posted by Whitmore, September 21, 2009 08:45pm | Post a Comment

The longest-running drama in US broadcast history, Guiding Light, has wrapped it up after 15,762 episodes and an incredible 72-year run. This past Friday, September 18th CBS aired the final episode. Because of its high production costs and falling ratings, it was decided last April to pull the plug. Though there was a huge outcry over the decision, viewership over the last year was still down to about 40 percent of the audience it captured a decade ago. CBS plans to replace the soap opera on October 5 with yet another, newer version of Let's Make a Deal, hosted by Wayne Brady. That sounds like a winning idea!
 
According to what I heard by the water cooler this afternoon, the daytime Soap icon went out big and tearful, with most of the characters gathering for the perfect picnic on the perfect day. Meanwhile back in the town of Springfield, in front of the old light house, the incessantly on-again-off-again romance between Reva and Josh met Fate one more time, one last time, where finally, once again, they reconfirmed their love for each other. This time -- it was best of times, music filled the air tenderly as a beautifully slow moving, gauzy camera shot gazed over the lovers driving off into the sunset in Josh's pick-up truck, no doubt destined for bliss and wedding bells and living happily ever after in the foggy Neverland of cancellation.
 
Some fans complained the ending was rushed. Other fans are still in denial, thinking this must be an elaborate and misplaced April Fools joke, a publicity stunt. Some are saying CBS is crazy, out of their minds, that CBS and their collective heads are up their collective asses, and though it’s great Reva and Josh are finally together again, what about Jeffery, nobody mentioned Jeffrey, what happened, is he still alive, where’s Jeffrey?
 
Nonetheless, millions of devout fans are having to bid adieu to those wonderfully dysfunctional Spaulding and the Lewis families and the seemingly infinite number of marriages, scandals, divorces, affairs, remarriages, re-divorces, the missing, the found, the dead, the back-from-the-dead, little white lies, big bad lies, secrets, shames, gossip, cheats and scoundrels, lusty scoundrels and cheats, the innocent, love gone bad, gone mad, temptations, taboos, mind boggling miracles and mind bending seductions, steamy and sexy story lines heating up kitchen tables and kaffeeklatsches across this star spangled land of ours where old and young hearts skip beats in odd polyrhythmic patterns.
 
Created during the Depression, The Guiding Light debuted January 25, 1937 as a 15-minute program on NBC radio. It was the original soap opera; being owned by Procter & Gamble, most advertisements spotlighted P&G’s line of products like Ivory, Tide, Mr. Clean, Cascade, Zest and Crest toothpaste. The Guiding Light first moved to the CBS radio in 1947 and later premiered on the same television network on June 30, 1952. No American Television show has come this close to spanning the entire history of the medium.
 
So as we fade to black, stay tuned for the award winning drama The Edge of Night, next over most of these CBS stations. This program was recorded.”



New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 09/25/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 21, 2009 01:10pm | Post a Comment


New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming This Weekend:

Itamar Sagi
SELIO EP 12" 
BAO020
 
 
 

"SELIO" is an uplifting and punching slab of techno, with a really fat beat and ITAMAR's trademark chord stabs. On the flip is "SERIES 1," a paced down and trippy number. Very atmospheric in the mood, but with a bouncy groove.
     

Mod.civil
GHOST EP 12" 
RC018

Raw synth line & chord driven dub techno house (?) by the mysterious MOD.CIVIL project (ORNAMENTS). If you like that dark, dubby sound (LEVON VINCENT, FACHWERK, MIKE DEHNART), this is totally for you. Also includes an "acapella" GHOST tool, perfect for building the tension.    


Jon Kennedy 14 (WHITE VINYL w/DROP) DLP ORG12010

Chrissy Murderbot ST DLP SLEAZE002LP

Chromeo I CAN'T TELL YOU WHY 7" K7247S

DJ Vadim THAT LITE 12" BBE146SLP

Jimmy Edgar FUNKTION EP-SETH TROXLER 12" IT004

Krazy Baldhead THE B SUITE DLP BEC5772499

Liquid Liquid LIQUID LIQUID DLP MW078LP

Make The Girl Dance BABY BABY BABY 12" ROY12

Moby MISTAKE REMIXES 12" BEC5772579              

Peter Kruder COMPOST BLACK LABEL #50 12" COMP334

Relocate DOT DOT DASH (BURAKA SOM SISTEMA REMIX) 12” BR003

Rob DODECALOGUE VOL.1 12" INSROB01

Various COSMIC EXCURSIONS DLP COSMIC1704
     



New House/Disco 12"s Coming This Weekend:

KDMS 
NEVER STOP BELIEVING 12" 
GOMMADT003  


KATHY DIAMOND and MAXIMILIAN SKIB are THE KDMS, and their vocal disco sound is absolutely killer. This single features the original plus two more remixes from NYC's legendary DJ NICKY SIANO (STUDIO 54, PARADISE GARAGE). Flawless production! AEROPLANE, DANIEL WANG are huge fans.    

 

Motorcitysoul

VIVID-ROMAN FLUGEL RMX 12" 
SIMPLE0942

Trademark cut. Resonant evolving chords, organic percussion, wild pitch fx & loops combine for utter devastation. ROMAN FLUGEL drops a loopy groove that locks you in, and the heavy dub included practically steals the show. APPLEBLIM, MILTON JACKSON, CHATEAU FLIGHT all are rockin this joint.
    


Alexkid CELI DUB EP 12" REKIDS043

Andre Crom & Luca Doobie ATTICA EP 12" FR124

Pure-P BABY BE WITHOUT YOU 12" GAMM052

Abyss COMPOST BLACK LABEL #53 12" COMP332

Al Usher LULLABY FOR ROBERT-P.THOMAS 12" INT0092

Alice Orpheus MY LADY EP 12" KDD003

Atmosfear WOLF MUSIC EP-GREYMATTER 12" WOLFEP001

Black Disco ABEL'S EP 12" BD005

Boddhi Satva ON POINT 12" SM014

DJ Gant Man JUKE DAT GIRL 12" FGR019

Filippo Moscatello PAGLIAGGIO RMXS 12" MOOD077

Ghost Town CONTACT & COUNTDOWN 12" GT003

Glimpse & M.Eyerer SOUTHERN SOUL 12" 046BUZZ

Hoodfellas CHEERS TO THE BAD GUY 12" SCM007

Horse Meat Disco EP #3 12" HMD003

Jacob Korn I LIKE THE SUN-P.THOMAS 12" RB017

Los Charlys Orchestra NUEVO DISCO EP 12" IMAGENES005

Rasmus Faber ARE YOU READY PART 2 12" FP016

Ray Mang TATTOO ME 12" REG011

Ricky L. SIMPLE AND NASTY 12" R009

Scope THIS RHYTHM 12" NRK152             

Seulo NEVER AGAIN 12" ALIVE013

Steve Bug SWALLOWED TOO MUCH BASS 12" PFR106

Subjects MIRAGE EP 12" BHB003
     



New Dubstep/Jungle 12"s Coming This Weekend:
d1
D1
DUBSTEP WARZ 12" 
DFVINYL001

Both tracks here appeared on the dubstep DVD documentary DUB FILES. D1's "DUBSTEP WARZ" is a deep, slow mo, haunting bass number. While gets in yer face with "GET YOUR COCK OUT," a manic, hyper party dubstep cut not for the feint of heart!    


The Heavy
HOW YOU LIKE ME NOW? - JOKER REMIX 12"
COUNT026

Sounding like a JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE track shoved thru a purple dubstep meat grinder in Bristol, JOKER's remix is slinky, sleazy, and funky. On the flip are a remix and a dub from SOLO, who takes the cut deep into conga-heavy, tech-house territory.
    


Akira Kiteshi BOOM N POW 12" ACRE014

Alborosie KINGSTON TOWN - BASSNECTAR REMIX 12" MS01

Bassnectar ART OF REVOLUTION 12"  AM001      

Jaybird WORK DAT BOX 12" KRKN010

Marlow BANDWAGON JUNGLIST 12" BOKA021

Pinch & Distance TERMINATE 12" DLS002

Quest LAST DAYS 12" MEDI021

Various HYPERDUB 5.1 EP 12" HDB023         
 Various HYPERDUB 5.2 EP 12" HDB024         
 

PRINCE PAUL'S 1999 PRINCE AMONG THIEVES IS A SLEPT-ON GEM

Posted by Billyjam, September 21, 2009 08:20am | Post a Comment

As with all projects he undertakes, the ever-creative Prince Paul did an amazing job on the above short movie which was "written, produced, arranged, scored & hustled" by the producer. He first came to fame prince paul a prince among thievesin the 80's / early 90's as a member of Stetsasonic, and a producer for both 3rd Bass' debut and most notably De La Soul's debut, plus their two subsequent albums. Since then he has collaborated with a myriad of artists, including Dan the Automator on the concept project The Handsome Boy Modeling School.

The film clip above was all part of the high concept album of the same name which tells the story of an aspiring young emcee named Tariq who has to get money to record his demo tape before a meeting with RZA of the Wu-Tang Clan. The tale unfolds as Tariq and his friend True (played by rapper Big Sha) hustle drugs and encounter a police ambush, incarceration, and a deadly showdown.

Prince Among Thieves (the artist's second solo record) didn't get nearly the level of attention it deserved when it came out ten years ago. It features Kool Keith, Del La Soul, Big Daddy Kane, Chubb Rock, Sadat X, Xzibit, Everlast, and others, and is well worth seeking out on CD, vinyl, VHS or DVD.

The Tarantino Solution 2: Inglourious Basterds (2009), A Moral Defense

Posted by Charles Reece, September 20, 2009 11:11pm | Post a Comment
Page 1  (Again, BEWARE SPOILERS!)

I’m waiting for any of the enthusiasts for Inglourious Basterds to come up with some guidance about what grown-up things this movie has to say to us about World War 2 or the Holocaust — or maybe just what it has to say about other movies with the same subject matter. Or, if they think that what Tarantino is saying is adolescent but still deserving of our respect and attention, what that teenage intelligence consists of. Or implies. Or inspires. Or contributes to our culture. -- Jonathan Rosenbaum, again


Certainly, there's a difference between Bonhoeffer taking no pleasure in his decision and the viewer's finding entertainment in Shosanna's, namely that between real world events and their aesthetic use. Since Mendelsohn and Rosenbaum are film critics, I'm guessing they aren't of the "art after Auschwitz is barbaric" persuasion, so their problem is with the film's message, its delivery and reception. The Jewish devised cinematic hell to which the Nazis become condemned might even be seen as tragic if you're sympathetic to their goals. As the administer and representative of the Volk's will, Col. Landa's murdering Shosanna's family sets into motion the wheels of fate that is their (the Nazi's, if not exactly Lando's) destruction. From the Greeks to Shakespeare, tragedies, we should recall, were (and still are) performed for pleasure, or what might be called entertainment. The world of art would be a lot less interesting if it came with the book of answers that Rosenbaum demands of Inglourious Basterds. How about a quote from Vladimir Nabokov?

I presume there exist readers who find titillating the display of mural words in those hopelessly banal and enormous novels which are typed out by the thumbs of tense mediocrities and called "powerful" and "stark" by the reviewing hack. There are gentle souls who would pronounce Lolita meaningless because it does not teach them anything. I am neither a reader nor a writer of didactic fiction, [...] Lolita has no moral in tow. For me a work of fiction exists only insofar as it affords me what I shall bluntly call aesthetic bliss, that is a sense of being somehow, somewhere, connected with other states of being where art [...] is the norm. -- from "On a Book Entitled Lolita"

Now, Rosenbaum is one of our best film critics, not some "reviewing hack," and Tarantino ain't exactly Nabokov, but everything else fits the bill. This former's criticisms, this time around, don't amount to much more than pandering moralism, and the latter, like Nabokov, is more interested in staying true to the story he's telling than whatever it might say about the real world. But this doesn't mean that his story has nothing relevant to say about whatever Rosenbaum is referring to with "our culture." The film isn't mere entertainment, or what some fanboy defense might call "just a movie," but rather a sort of parody in Nabokov's sense when he said, "satire teaches a lesson, parody is a game."


Hitler and Joseph Goebbels were admirers of Fritz Lang's Metropolis, likely hearing echos of their own call for the restoration of a soul to the dehumanizing technocracy of modernity ("the mediator between the brain and hands must be the heart!"). However, humanity, like violence, depends on the details. They didn't see an analogy of the oppressed workers at the bottom of Lang's pseudo-utopia -- who kept it running for the pleasure of the bourgeoisie and rich -- to the Nazis' use of Jewish slave labor in factories like Mittelwork where the V-2 bomb was manufactured. As Col. Landa spells out to the farmer in Chapter 1, the Jews were seen as racially other, not deserving of the moral obligation that obtains to one's neighbors in the ethnic Lebenstraum (living space). For a similar reason, American kids aren't expected to look in abhorrence at singing grapes being used to sell their own execution or anthropomorphic squirrel-operated machinery in The Flintstones. Ignoring such human traits is fine in fantasy, but not when someone tries to supplant the real with the fantastic. And, as Landa argues, the Jews weren't seen even as the equivalent of squirrels (much less the happily working and talking kind), but rats. It's this kind of rationalization that makes the bureaucratization of evil possible.

So when Tarantino parodies the burning in Lang's Nazi-favored film with Shosanna's own version, there's more going on than geeky appropriation. At the moment in Goebbel's Nation's Pride when Pvt. Zoller (the Nazi "Sergeant York") asks, "who wants to send a message to Germany?," Shosanna's image cuts in to answer that she does, commanding Marcel standing behind the screen to set fire to the film stock. The real Shosanna is already dead, killed in the projection booth by the real Zoller as she was showing a bit of compassion for the not-quite-dead wouldbe rapist, having just shot him in the back. The last bit of human compassion having been drilled out her in grieving slow motion (one of the few nods to Enzo Castellari's Inglorious Bastards), the only thing left is a mechanically reproduced image to be shown only once in a particular place, creating an aura of terror for this particular group of "art" lovers.


In Metropolis, it is the mechanical Maria who is put to the stake, having tricked the workers into destroying the machines that would keep the city functioning. I'm not going to summarize the serpentine plot of Lang's film (read it here if you dare), so suffice it to say the means-end utopia was brought down by a robot simulation of one of the oppressed (Maria) that was the bypodruct of the city ruler's faulty/inhumane ratiocinations. (That is, Fredersen, the ruler, gained possession of Hel, the love of the inventor Rotwang, eventually using her up -- she died during childbirth -- which led to Rotwang making the robot as a replacement, but it had its own demonic plans that involved taking the form of Maria.) Thus, Shosanna (and maybe Tarantino) saw the analogy that Goebbels and Hitler didn't. Define another's humanity out of your ratio-moral system and the only interaction left possible is with the robotic husk. Shosanna's moral choice in such an immoral situation was, like Bonhoffer's, to point the demonic reproduction to which she had been reduced back at the Nazis and let it take its course.

Page 3

Remembering Steve Goodman

Posted by Whitmore, September 20, 2009 06:42pm | Post a Comment

I’m not from Chicago, but I like Chicago, and though I’m a true blue, life long LA Dodgers fan, I’ve always had a soft spot for the Chicago Cubs: Wrigley Field, Hippo Vaughn, Three-Finger Mordecai Brown (who really only had three fingers on his right hand, but two them sported World Series rings), Riggs Stephenson, Ron Santo, ‘Mr. Cubs’ Ernie Banks, Billy Williams, Fergie Jenkins, Milt Pappas, Ryne Sandberg, Jack Brickhouse and Harry Caray and on and on ... these have been some tough years for Cubs fans. It's been one hundred and one years and counting since their last World Series victory.

Anyway, today, September 20th, marks the 25th anniversary of the death of one of the biggest Cubs fans ever to cheer amid the hallowed ivy covered walls of Wrigley Field, singer-songwriter Steve Goodman. Born and raised in Chicago, he never had much success as a solo recording artist, though his albums constantly received critical acclaim; he found far greater accolades as a songwriter. Some folks say he wrote the greatest Country and Western song ever recorded, and it says so right there in the song. “You Never Even Call Me By My Name” was the biggest hit record David Allan Coe ever had and the lyrics mention everything a proper and perfect Country/Western song should ever need or want: mama, jail, dead dogs, trains, trucks and drunkenness. Goodman also wrote the greatest friggin’ song about the railroads, “City Of New Orleans,” which became the biggest charting hit of Arlo Guthrie’s career. In the early 1970’s Goodman saw Guthrie in a bar and asked if he could play him a song. Guthrie agreed only on condition that Goodman first buy him a beer. The song would become something of an American standard, covered by many others including Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, John Denver, Jerry Reed, Hank Snow, Willie Nelson and even David Hasselhoff. Goodman also wrote some great songs about his own home town, “A Dying Cub Fan's Last Request;” “Go, Cubs, Go;” “The Lincoln Park Pirates,” a tribute to the notorious Lincoln Towing Company; and “Daley's Gone,” about Mayor Richard J. Daley, undisputed king of Chicago’s backroom politics, the last of the big city bosses, whose power didn’t create disorder, but was there to preserve disorder.

About the time Goodman's career really began taking off, he was diagnosed with leukemia. Still he managed to write and perform and fight cancer; he had a tongue-in-cheek nickname for the disease, “Cool Hand Leuk.” On September 20, 1984, Goodman died at University of Washington Hospital in Seattle. He was 36 years old. Eleven days later, the Chicago Cubs played their first play-off game since 1945 at Wrigley Field.
 
During the 2007 season, the Chicago Cubs began playing Goodman's recording, "Go, Cubs, Go," after each home game win. When the Cubs made it to the playoffs, interest in the song and in Goodman surged, resulting in October 5, 2007 being declared by Illinois Lieutenant Governor Pat Quinn as Steve Goodman Day across Lincoln's Great State.





THE AGE OF STUPID TAKES US TO THE YEAR 2055...AND IT AIN'T PRETTY

Posted by Billyjam, September 20, 2009 09:57am | Post a Comment

The unique and compelling film The Age Of Stupid's warning message of the impending doom of the planet brought on by global warming is quite clear. The film, directed by Franny Armstrong, who spent four years making it, strikes a perfect balance between documentary and Sci-Fi film styles. Back in March of this year, The Age Of Stupid opened in select theaters, but tomorrow, Monday, September 21st, the film will experience its official global premiere when this docu-drama, in an unprecedented coordinated effort, will simultaneously open in 700 theaters in 62 different countries around the globe. TIcket/venue info here. This carefully coordinated global screening, which was sponsored in part by such organizations as Greenpeace and MoveOn.org, was planned for tomorrow to be concurrent with United Nations Climate Week during the week of the UN Secretary-General’s Summit on Climate Change, September 19th to 26th.

While more and more news on the very real impact  global warming has on our planet is published regularly, it seems like the average person doesn't  realize the seriousness of this issue. Many feel that The Age of Stupid, which takes viewers ahead to the year 2055 -- and it ain't pretty -- articulates in an entertaining (albeit darkly dramatic) way exactly what climate scientists have been warning us of for quite some time... time is running out for the human race and its planet. For more info click here.

The Slingshot & Other Bathing Beauties

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 19, 2009 07:50pm | Post a Comment


We're having another hot weekend in L.A., so a batch of swimsuit covers seems appropriate.






Although we can't see Sandy's lower half, I'm pretty sure he's ready for a swim. The Mercury Spin-Girl series is awesome and I think that I'm going to track them all down. Maybe I'll be able to find some suffering from the Mercury ghosting effect that I covered last summer in a previous blog.




International Talk Like a Pirate Day

Posted by Whitmore, September 19, 2009 06:30pm | Post a Comment
Avast me mateys! By the powers this day be, a good day to pour ye self a tall, deep grog, get loaded to the gunwales, raise the Jolly Roger and scare the livn’ bejesus out of them landlubbin’ scurvy dogs, argh! Aye! On the account, today is International Talk Like a Pirate Day, no son of a biscuit eater goin’ to put up with them lily-livered scallywags, or them sprogs! Aye, I might toss a wee bit wi' a wannion on them scurvy asses, toss em into Davy Jones' Locker. Tell the tale me heartys! Slight no black spot on me troubled soul! Us gentlemen o' fortune need more than doubloons and booty before sailin’ into Fiddlers Green ... aye the sweet trade! Ahoy, ye need a furner to sail thar, wenchs ands the gates of Hades starboard to grabs at ye gods own swaggy golden pieces o’ eight! Yo ho ho ho!
 
Shiver me timbers, I think I was momentarily possessed by the ghost of some long dead privateer, or more likely a B-movie screen writer from the 1930’s!
 
Every September 19th is International Talk Like a Pirate Day. The day was created back in 1995 by John Baur, AKA ol' Chumbucket and Mark Summers, AKA Cap'n Slappy as an inside joke. But the holiday didn’t achieve any real media attention until 2002 when Miami Herald syndicated columnist and Pulitzer Prize winning writer of "distinguished commentary," Dave Barry, wrote about it. Today there are somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,500 “Talk Like a Pirate” videos on YouTube, and millions of websites dedicated in one way or another to Talk Like a Pirate Day. According to Summers, he chose this particular date because it would be easy for him to remember; it’s his ex-wife's birthday. Aargh! I hoist a tankard to ya and spit in yer eye, ye ol’ stinkin’ blaggards!

Silencio! - The Hispanic & Latino experience in the silent era

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 19, 2009 02:26pm | Post a Comment
Like other minorities in Hollywood (e.g. Asians, blacks, gays, Natives and women, to name a few), Hispanics and Latinos in the silent film era were almost exclusively produced by people who had little or no first hand experience of their subjects. But whilst Latinos may've been almost entirely excluded from the filmmaking process, a handful of actors found work in front of the camera and in the process opened doors for the generations that followed.

In film's first decade, a few Latinos in fact were involved in American filmmaking. Before the Hollywood era, the filmmaking process wasn't centralized and films were shot around the country by wealthy entrepreneurs, a few of which were Hispanic. However, most American films in the 1890s were under ten minutes long and tended to focus on single actions like sneezing, laughing or opening a door.

Though film roles in the 1890s tended to avoid any minority issues, there were a few minorities in film. In 1903, the first version of Uncle Tom's Cabin hit the screen and went on to be the most frequently adapted story in the silent era, suggesting that there was at least concern about black issues, if not other minorities. In the teens, with films like A Woman Scorned, The Squaw Man, Intolerance and The Italian, depictions of minorities broadened considerably.


                    

Two Latina actresses, Vera and Beatriz Michelena, were among the first to appear in film. The Michelenas were the New York-born daughters of Caracas-born opera singer Fernando Gonzalez. Like generations that followed, their "exotic looks" resulted in their sometimes being used as all-purpose ethnic types, although, in the title role of Heart of Juanita, Beatriz actually played a presumably Latina character (I haven't seen it).
Most Latino characters in the 1910s weren't afforded the occasional sympathy shown toward other minorities, with most Latinos depicted as dastardly "greasers," as in the films Tony the Greaser (1911), The Greaser's Revenge (1914) and the remake of Tony the Greaser, Tony the Greaser (1914). The latter, ironically, featured Myrtle Gonzalez as "Mary Blake." Generally, Mexicans were depicted as lazy and deceitful, which, not surprisingly, didn't go over especially well with Mexicans and when they responded by boycotting Hollywood, American filmmakers responded by carefully applying the negative stereotype to all Latinos, not just Mexicans.

          

For non-Latino, white, European Hispanics, race wasn't necessarily an issue. Los Angeles native Myrtle Gonzalez was billed as "The Virgin White Lily of the Screen" during her short career -- she died at 27 in the 1918 flu pandemic. Antonio Moreno was a Spanish-born actor/director. In his early films, he often played the Latin Lover, a stereotypical protrayal of supposedly exotic Mediterranean types popular at the time. Fetishizing Europeans was all well and good in the silent era, but with the coming of sound, Moreno's accent was viewed as a detriment and his career came to a halt.

            
 
In the 1920s, the vogue for Latins (as opposed to Latinos) like Moreno and Italian Rudolph Valentino proved so popular that actors actually concocted phony identities to pass, such as Jewish actor Jacob Krantz who was reborn "Ricardo Cortez." When people found out he wasn't actually Spanish, he tried to claim that he was at least French... which also proved untrue.

             

Actual flesh and blood Latinos, as a result of the craze, soon found work in Hollywood, including Ramon Novarro, Dolores Del Rio, Gilbert Roland and Lupe Velez. By the late '20s, they were internationally known stars, beloved for their inevitably sexually-charged portrayals, a stereotype that, some 80 years later, continues to be almost comically perpetuated on the rare occasions when Hollywood portrays Hispanic and Latino characters.

DMC/ITF DJ CHAMPION ROC RAIDA OF X-ECUTIONERS DEAD AT AGE 37

Posted by Billyjam, September 19, 2009 01:29pm | Post a Comment

It has been reported by several sources that New York turntablist Roc Raida of X-Men/X-Ecutioners fame has died earlier today. The DMC and ITF DJ battle champ was 37 years of age. The artist had reportedly been hospitalized for a serious spinal injury following a recent accident while kick-boxing training. Along with Rob Swift, Total Eclipse, and Mista Sinista, Roc Raida rounded out the best known line-up of the X-Ecutioners (formerly the X-Men), whose other members had included Steve Dee, DJ Boogie Blind and DJ Precision.

In addition to performing and recording with his DJ crew (in 2002 the X-Ecutioners dropped Built From Scratch on Loud), he also collaborated with numerous hip-hop artists over the years, including Big Pun, Immortal Technique, O.C., Buckshot Lefonque, and Smif N' Wessun. Above is one of Raida's great turntable routines from the 1995 DMC battle that he won in which he displays his typical playful, fun approach to the art of scratching, incorporating ample use of body tricks. Note that at this time his crew was still named X-Men (they eventually were forced to change it due to Marvel Comics sending a cease and desist) and the DJ was known as Roc Raider (with an "R" at the end). I knew Roc Raida for many years and last interviewed him about two years ago. I will try to find that interview to transcribe for a future Amoeblog. R.I.P. Roc Raida.

WALK THIS WAY: TRACING THE ORIGINS OF MJ'S MOONWALK

Posted by Billyjam, September 19, 2009 09:05am | Post a Comment

Origins of the Moonwalk

Michael JackMichael Jacksonson was known not just for his music, but also for his dancing abilities. There are many recorded instances of the moonwalk, originally known as the backslide or "walking on your toes," being used before Michael Jackson did it.

Similar steps are reported as far back as 1932, used by Cab "Minnie the Moocher" Calloway. It was first recorded in 1955 in a performance (in the film that same year Showtime At The Apollo) by tap dancer Bill Bailey.

Jeffrey Daniel brought "the backslide" to the tv show Soul Train. In 1980, Jackson asked Daniel (together with dance partners Geron Candidate and Cooley Jackson) to teach him the dance. Michael first performed this move during his "Billie Jean" performance on Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever on March 25, 1983.

Jeffrey Daniel's Influence on Michael Jackson

I remember also seeing this move performed by Mr. Freeze (of the Rock Steady Crew) in the movie Flashdance, released April 15th, 1983. See Flashdance clip below.

South Pasadena Sat. Afternoon Organ Concert & Silent Film

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 18, 2009 03:50pm | Post a Comment



Tomorrow the Los Angeles Theatre Organ Society is hosting an afternoon of silent film w/ pipe organ accompaniment. The event will be held at the South Pasadena High School campus, which is stunning and features an amazing auditorium-- a New Deal era PWA masterpiece that houses a fully functioning Wurlitzer pipe organ. Join John Rinaudo and his hand cranked silent film projections along with Dean Mora on the Mighty Wurlitzer organ.




Saturday September 19th, 1:30 PM
South Pasadena High School Auditorium
1401 Fremont Ave.
South Pasadena, Ca
$20 at the door
 
 
 

AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP 09:18:09

Posted by Billyjam, September 18, 2009 01:38pm | Post a Comment
                    

Amoeba Music San Francisco Weekly Hip-Hop Top Ten: 09:18:09  (c/o Luis)

Kid Cudi
1) Kid Cudi Man On The Moon: The End of Day (Motown / Pgd)

2) KRS-ONE & Buckshot Survival Skills (Duck Down)

3) Drake So Far Gone (Cash Money)

4) M.O.P. The Foundation (E1 Entertainment)

5) Q-Tip Kamaal the Abstract (Battery Records)

6) Nicolay City Lights 2 - Shibuya (Hard Boiled Records)

7) New Boyz Skinny Jeanz & A Mic (Asylum Records)

DJ Fresh8) DJ Fresh The Tonite Show (The Album) (Town Thizzness)

9) DJ Shadow Diminishing Returns (Reconstruction Productions)

10) Young Cellski/aka 2Took Mr Predicter (Inner City 2000)

In Treatment - Byrne vs. Hamm Smackdown!

Posted by Miss Ess, September 17, 2009 06:37pm | Post a Comment
When I was watching the Golden Globes last year, I eagerly anticipated the Best Actor in a TV Series - Drama category. I had tuned in pretty much just for this moment: to see Mad Men's Jon Hamm get up there and make an acceptance speech. After gorging myself on two season's worth of the delicious Mad Men in record time, I was 100% sure that he was a shoe-in to win.

Surprise! The Golden Globe went to Gabriel Byrne for In Treatment.


From that moment on, I knew I had to check out In Treatment...I mean, if you can beat Jon Hamm's tortured, pefectly reined in depiction of Don Draper as far as acting goes...somethin's up.

In Treatment Season 1 is finally out on DVD and I've been watching it here and there for the past few weeks. The reason I've been moving so slowly on it is there's a whole lotta show...as in, one half hour, five nights a week...9 discs worth of show! Is that some kind of record or something?

Anyway, the show is great. I have to say though, if you don't enjoy slow moving character studies, this is not the show for you. It's simply about a therapist and his patients, one patient per half hour episode, five nights a week, with the fifth night reserved for Paul (Byrne)'s own session with the fabulous Dianne Weist as Gina, his therapist.

What's so good about this show to me is that it is all about details and slow reveals. You might think a show that is this seemingly simplistic would be dull as tombs, but for me at least, there is great pleasure in the writing and the layers to each character that slip off weekly like the skin of an onion. I applaud its creator, writers and directors for working so deftly and interestingly within such spareness.

So, after having a good gander, do I think the Emmy is deserved? Well, yes, because the show really allows Byrne to act subtly, to keep a great deal of emotion boiling just below the surface -- moments are registered much more in his expression than verbally, and that takes en pointe skill and precision, particularly to keep such a conceptionally bare show interesting. He also is the only actor who is in every single episode of this epically produced series, so he's got a whole lot of material to get through and does so with ease. But do I think he should have won over Jon Hamm's tour de force as Don Draper...? Nah. I think Hamm's performance is one of my favorites in TV history. But both Mad Men and In Treatment are finely acted, worthwhile and compelling television.

We got another showdown coming up this Sunday Sunday Sunday when the 2009 Emmys will be broadcast live. Byrne and Hamm will be going head to head once again, with each nominated for Best Actor in a TV Series - Drama. We'll see who triumphs this time out! I'm still rooting for Hamm, but at least this time I know the real sc

FEMALE DRUMMERS: AMOEBITE KAITLIN INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, September 17, 2009 05:30pm | Post a Comment
Kaitlin

One of the many highlights of the recent Amoebapalooza North 2009 at the Mezzanine club in San Francisco (August 2nd) was the power-duo-- the $helbyville $helbyvilllains' all too short set in which talented San Francisco Amoebites Josh Pollock (guitar/vocals) and Kaitlin Layher (drums, above) effortlessly channeled the White Stripes. Even more impressive was the fact I later learned: that Kaitlin had only been playing the drums for a relatively short time and that this was the first time that she had ever played drums out in public. I recently caught up with Kaitlin to ask her about her personal Moe Tuckerexperiences as a drummer, as well as about female drummers in general as part of the long running In Celebration of the Drum Amoeblog series.

Amoeblog: Who are among your favorite female drummers and why?

Kaitlin: My favorite female drummer currently drumming is Adrienne Davies of Earth. I love watching her controlled, deliberate movements.  She's hypnotizing. Moe Tucker of the Velvet Underground was amazing as well as Karen Carpenter. And, of course, I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for Meg White of The White Stripes. But you can't forget the all-girl groups, too! The Bangles and The Runaways were simply solid bands with solid drummers.

out this week 9/8 & 9/15...xx...kid cudi...muse...the feelies...health...

Posted by Brad Schelden, September 17, 2009 04:41pm | Post a Comment

From the moment I first heard the single "Crystalized" by the XX, I have been eagerly anticipating the release of the album. That song just got deep down inside of me. It is such a fantastic song and is the kind of song that really affects you emotionally. It made me cry I think the first time I heard it, and yet I keep going back to it and can't get it out of my head. It is like the best day of your life that is now only a memory. It becomes tinged with sadness since you know you will never experience that day again and it will only be a memory. I love being nostalgic and I often put experiences too quickly into my memory. Sometimes I make them into memories as they are still happening. When I am having a really great day or experiencing a really magical part of life, I immediately start thinking about how I will remember this moment before it is even over. I know that we often make our memories better than the actual event so I try to reflect on the moment as it is happening to make sure my memory is more accurate. I don't know if all this makes sense, but I am basically comparing this song, this band and this whole album to the greatest memories of the greatest experiences that you have in your life. They are fantastic memories but also have a hint of sadness and tragedy because they are just memories.

The new self titled album by the XX is as good as the single. There is not a bad song on the album. It is XX by XXactually a pretty simple album. There is really not a lot of stuff going on here. The songs are structured simply and most have male and female vocals trading back and forth. It just comes together beautifully somehow. I have always loved R&B and the darker side of New Wave music, but rarely do the two genres meet. They often couldn't be more different. But XX manages to somehow combine the genres into one magical style of music. I would never call the XX a Goth band but they might appeal to fans of Goth music. They will for sure appeal to anybody who likes Dark Wave or Dream Pop. Fans of Mazzy Star, Cocteau Twins, Piano Magic, & For Against will not be disappointed. The music often sounds like The Cure or Joy Division. Maybe like Blonde Redhead's version of Joy Division. But the songs also have the feeling of a really good R&B ballad. Imagine R. Kelly or Aaliyah singing along to a Joy Division song. They totally make it work and I totally have fallen in love with this band. But beware! These songs are not going to make you get up and dance. I doubt they will put a smile on your face. The album is on the dark side. XX is made up of four friends from South West London who are all in their very early 20s, but they seem to have already experienced the whole range of emotions that most of us will ever go through. The album is released on the label Young Turks which has quietly been putting out albums and singles for the last couple of years. This might be the best record it has put out so far.

You really need to experience the XX yourself to properly make up your mind about them. I have not had the chance to see them live yet but I will be going to see them as soon as I can. The album has 11 tracks and it is really hard to pick my favorite song. They all sort of blend into each other to make up one simply perfect album. I probably love "Crystalized" more than anything, but "Heart Skipped A Beat" and "VCR" are also fantastic. "Shelter" and "Night Time" are also two of the better songs on the album. They are for sure two of the darker songs on an album full of darkness. I know I keep saying it, but all the songs are amazing! "Shelter" could easily be a song by Portishead. I always love the contrast of the male and female voice. Some bands just get it perfect. The contrasting voices on this album are often not so contrasting. They are both dark and on the deeper side, but it still works. I am gonna go back and listen to some more XX right now. I can usually only take the album about once a day. It is sort of like the Carpenters...I love them more than anything but their music can sometimes get me down and I can really only handle that about once a day. But don't let that scare you away from listening to this album. The best things in life often come with a bit of heartache, and what is the point of life without the risk of some heartache? This album is for sure worth it. I love it.

here is the video for "Crystalized" by the XX...



and here is the video for "Basic Space" by the XX...




also out this 9/8..






After Robots by Blk Jks











The Good Earth (Reissue) by The Feelies










Crazy Rhythms (Reissue) by The Feelies











Friendly Fires (Deluxe Edition) by Friendly Fires











Get Color by Health











Visitor by Jim O'Rourke











In Prism by Polvo






out 9/9...





The Beatles Reissues (Rubber Soul/Abbey Road/Let It Be/Etc...)







also out 9/15...






Central Market by Tyondai Braxton











Keep In Mind Frankenstein by Grand Archives











Man on the Moon by Kid Cudi











Journal For Plague Lovers by Manic Street Preachers











Resistance by Muse











Skinny Jeanz & A Mic by New Boyz











Kamaal the Abstract by the Q-Tip











Temporary Pleasure by Simian Mobile Disco











Ashes Grammar by A Sunny Day In Glasgow











Diary and LP2 by Sunny Day Real Estate (reissues)











Manafon by David Sylvian




September 16, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, September 17, 2009 02:05pm | Post a Comment




TRUCKATHON Saturday at the New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, September 16, 2009 03:26pm | Post a Comment

September 19 TRUCKATHON

5 Film All Day Event!
All Tickets $10
One Ticket Admits To All 5 Films

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036

C.B. Hustlers (1978) 4:15
Hot Vans ... C.B. Radios ... And The "Hardest Working" Girls You'll Ever Meet!!!

Thunder Run (1986) 6:00
No way out. No way through. No way left but to GO FOR IT!

White Line Fever (1975) 8:00
Carrol Jo Hummer--A working man who's had enough!

Road Games (1981) 10:00
The truck driver plays games... The hitchhiker plays games. And the killer is playing the deadliest game of all!

Black Dog (1998) Midnight
For Jack Crue, the rules of the road are simple. No passing, no tailgating, and no turning back.

COMETBUS ISSUE #52 THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, ANOTHER GREAT READ

Posted by Billyjam, September 16, 2009 11:36am | Post a Comment
cometbus
I recently picked up Cometbus #52 (The Spirit of St. Louis) at the Berkeley Amoeba Music store -- one of several fine independent retailers that carry the legendary, decades old, punk-literary series. As with all the previous installments of this Aaron "Cometbus" Elliot- penned slim book, such as last year's Cometbus #51 The Loneliness of the Electric Menorah, ever since I started reading it I can't put it down...which is a problem, in a good way, because I know in no time I will have read the entire engrossing 66 pages of this latest Cometbus. So  I find myself rationing my reading, allowing myself just nine pages, which is three Cometbus chapters, a day.

Cometbus #51 was a sort of history of the subculture of Telegraph Avenue, focusing on its bookstores and record stores. It incorporates into its story Cody's, Moe's, Universal, Rasputin, and (of course) Amoeba Music, as well as such age old Telegraph Avenue characters as Ace Backwards and Julia Vinograd (aka The Bubble Lady), whose poetry was included in that last issue.

For the The Spirit of St. Louis Cometbus, as its title implies, Aaron writes about St. Louis and the close-knit cast of colorful characters (including Brett, Pete Feet, Spike, Wayne Two, Penguin, Jody Lee, & Katie from Haiti) in the local punk scene that he interacted with in a previous time -- he never says exactly when, but, based on the music references, it seems like it is circa early/mid nineties. 

Amoebapalooza Hollywood 2009!

Posted by Amoebite, September 15, 2009 07:39pm | Post a Comment
Every year the staff of Amoeba Music in Hollywood get together for a no-holds-barred musical cage match called Amoebapalooza...20 Amoeba bands get as crazy as possible onstage for 10 minutes each!

Ho
Brently Heilbronw crazy IS possible?

Very crazy was the answer this year...and/or very glamorous, creepy, rockin', shockin', wild, wonderful, and dancetastic! One of the most wonderful and insane Amoebapalooza lineups of all time took the stage at the King King on Sunday night and showed how it was done. Surely any unsuspecting patrons to walk in from Hollywood Boulevard must have thought they had stumbled onto the set of some kind of psychedelic rock opera written by Andrew Lloyd Webber's brain-damaged evil twin, and hopefully they stuck around to enjoy it with the rest of us.

As our lovable and pants-wettingly funny host Brently Heilbron put it, it's the last Amoebapalooza of the decade...soon we won't have the Oughts to kick around anymore, and it'll be the Teens! Taking this temporal warning to heart, the musical freBen Ricciaks of Amoeba made sure they sent the Oughts out with a kaboom. Have a drink with me and let the show begin...

The lights went down on the red velvet curtain, and the festivities began with a Jaco-Pastorious-on-PCP solo bass guitar odyssey from gangly wunderkind Ben Ricci, bravely kicking off this night of strangeitude. Is the bass meant to make sounds like that? Dunno. Ben's bass wizardry was closely followed by the hard-charging sounds of Thin Lizzy tribute band Emerald, with one Sam Rodriguez channeling the spirit of the late great Phil Lynott. Sorry if I'm leaving anything out...the next thing I remember was the always mind-blowing cabaret fantasia of Cream Puff, the one-man show of antique futurist foppington Joey Jenkins. There really is nothing like Mr. Joey JenkinsJenkins...jigging, chanting and prophesizing from the stage, in his knickers and mountaineering headgear, he makes you feel like you've wandered into one of David Lynch's weirder dreams. He ended by collapsing in a grand death scene, instantly growing a marvellous flower from his heart. Showbiz!

New Electronic CD Releases 9/15/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 15, 2009 04:30pm | Post a Comment

HAITO GOPFRICH

Fiat Lux
Boxer

This is the debut full-length release from Berlin producer/DJ Haito Gopfrich -- the man of innumerable faces and the Doctor Mabuse of German dancefloors. Hooked by the eclectic early DJ-work of Hans Nieswandt and Eric D. Clark, Haito is now well-trained on Berlin's Loveparade vehicles, and as a result, his work has been pressed onto vinyl by labels such as Kickboxer, Malatoid, Spagat, Low Spirit and Acker Records. With Fiat Lux, Haito tells us his stories from the club in a colorful, thrilling and filmic way, emphasizing a diversified, round dance of styles, genres, ideas, sounds and beats. From the exhilarated groove of a gritty high-school comedy ("I Ro Love"), over the sticky heat of a foreign marketplace demolished by a wild chase with James Bond ("Pusher"), to the fizzling noise of a motor in a SF manga road movie, Haito seems to know how to set everything to the music he's got in mind. The hardcore continuum is cultivated by elegantly-rushed drum patterns ("Drugpeople"), Alfred Hitchcock's shower curtain knife-scene is shot into the universe via electro-funk ("Freedub"), and a harmonized depth of field meets a roughened, saw-tooth discourse ("Disconnect"). Even the Yakuza smasher with Renaissance costumes filmed in Andalusia finds its true destiny in the spinet rave of "Non Plus Ultra." And above all, intelligent sample editing, four-dimensional, fluffy synths and springy percussion sounds can't be wrong. The peak of the album is the 2009 version of "E-Love," a revised version of the 2008 hit released on Kickboxer: a couple of tricky samba piano sounds are smuggled into the pockets of a subtly-bouncing clapper trailing a comet-tail of synths. Last but not least, after the Wall Street psycho thriller "Mummy," and "Komm Mal Klar," you'll find "Good Times, Bad Times" -- a hymn for the closing credits with vocals by Eric D. Clark that pulls out all the emotional stops to keep the audience enthralled and teary-eyed.


VOODEUX
The Paranormal
Mothership

3x12" version previously released on Mothership, now available on CD with an extra track, "Skeleton Key." This is the debut full-length release by Boston/Philly duo Voodeux. Two years ago, on the East Coast of America, a couple of highly technical production wizards joined forces and created their own genre of strange and creepy techno under the moniker Voodeux. Tanner Ross and James Watts first released The Curse EP on Mothership in 2008 with great success. With DJ support rolling in from everywhere, Claude VonStroke soon commissioned them to record a full-length album of this new moody sound. The Paranormal is a concentrated vision of myth and mysterious beats, exploring the eerie afterlife side of techno like no other artists have done to date. It is a 10-track vision of ghosts and goblins hiding in the closet (or lurking in the dark corners of the dancefloor), ready to scare the daylights out of you. Using dark funk, ghoulish atmospheres, quizzical beats, growling, ominous vocal stabs and futuristic production, Voodeux is staking their claim as the next generation of American techno. The Paranormal is Halloween on wax, and a minimal techno masterwork for the modern underworld.


LAWRENCE
Until Then, Goodbye
Mule Electronic

This is the second full-length release from Hamburg's Lawrence on the Mule Electronic label. Dial and Smallville owner Peter Kersten, aka Lawrence, aka Sten, is one of the most valued and highly-regarded artists in the modern dance music community with a long history of releases on Nova Mute, Kompakt, Ladomat, Spectral, Ghostly, and of course, his own imprints. Until Then, Goodbye kicks off with a special "intro" version of fan favorite "Friday's Child," followed by the introspective ambient piece "Sunrise." "Grey Light" harkens to the electronic style of Durutti Column while "Jill" is purely sweet, slow house music. The album shifts towards more acoustic-driven material with songs such as "Father Umbrillo" and "Toderhausen Blues" -- but don't fret, purists, as Lawrence hits back with his classic signature sounds with the likes of "In Your Eyes" and "Sleep And Suffer." The beautiful whisper of the atmospheric ambient tune, "Don't Follow Me," the ebb and flow of the piano-driven "A New Day," and the title track leave the listener in a state of bliss. This is one of Lawrence's most daring and diverse albums to date -- not necessarily a "concept" album, but it definitely showcases his gift for provoking a remarkably wide range of musical influences and styles. Including nine previously-unreleased cuts, these are contemplative, acoustic-driven tracks with the deft, light hand that Lawrence has become renowned for.

FIVE THINGS KANYE WEST COULD HAVE SAID INSTEAD AT THE VMA'S

Posted by Billyjam, September 15, 2009 03:18pm | Post a Comment
Kayne West vs Taylor Swift
Kanye West
's well publicized little outburst at Sunday night's MTV Video Music Awards (VMAs), in which he bum-rushed the stage during country singing teen Taylor Swift's acceptance speech to grab her mic and offer his uninvited opinion on how unfair he felt it was that Beyonce didn't win in the Best Female Video category, gave the media some fodder complete with a good headline for their report on the otherwise ho-hum awards show. And the fact that there suspiciously was no security whatsoever to stop West from storming the stage merely proved what many have long speculated: that MTV's producers secretly encourage any kind of controversy to spice up and give some edge to their show.

But by now Kanye's attention grabbing stunts are beyond tired. On Sunday night, even Beyonce, whose honor he somehow believed he was defending, wasn't impressed by his rude gesture. Neither was anyone else it seemed. And why should they be? Beyond the disrespectful act itself, it's not like he was sticking up for some totally underrated, slept-on artist. It was Beyonce -- one of the world's biggest stars, who a little bit later on in the same show would be bestowed with the Video Of The Year award. If Kanye is going to bum rush the stage and grab someone's mic, he should use the opportunity to say something of substance or worth.  Here are five suggestions for Kanye of what he could have said instead:

1) Talk about something really important or of social/political relevance like he did four years ago in his infamous post-Katrina "George Bush doesn't care about black people" comment (see video below). Or take Beyoncethe opportunity to comment on the growing thinly veiled tide of racism towards Barack Obama, or question why a FOX News host is getting away with calling the president "a racist." Or how about offering some opinion on health care? Note that even the host of the evening, Russell Brand, addressed this issue. However, like everything else that this English host-with-an-acquired-taste uttered throughout the long evening, it simply didn't register with the VMA audience.

On the margins' margins - Asian Latinos - Latasian 101

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 15, 2009 12:35pm | Post a Comment
A common misconception about Latinos they are a racially homogeneous people. In Los Angeles and elsewhere, the word "Mexican" is used to refer to pretty much anyone who looks like they may have roots south of the Rio Grande, regardless of country of origin. I assume the same goes for Puerto Ricans and Cubans in areas where they dominate, although I'm not sure. I've heard the Honduran Latino population of New Orleans described as "Mexican" by more than one person.


Habana, Cuba

This misconception is, ironically, inadvertently furthered by many Latinos themselves. Though the concepts of “brown pride” and “La Raza,” are used to instill pride in Chicanos, mestizos, or those with Spanish ancestry (depending on how they’re applied), at the same time they effectively marginalize Latinos with African and Asian ancestry, despite their being no less Latino by definition. Furthermore, in the 2006 US Census, 48% of Latinos described themselves as white/European-American. Only 6% described themselves as of "two or more races." In fact, the majority of Latinos are clearly of mixed, partially indigenous heritage. The census question may be a trick, since, as most people know, any actual white person will steadfastly self-identify as Native American, claiming a great-great-great grandparent who was (usually) Cherokee.


Japanese Brazilians

What distinguishes countries in the New World from those in the Old is that here there's no such thing as a Nation-State and no countries in the western hemisphere correspond to a single ethinicity. Just as is the case in Anglo America (The Bahamas, Belize, Canada, Guyana, Jamaica, the United States and the Virgin Islands), there are Latinos whose race is Asian, black, Native, white or a combination thereof. In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, which begins today, the focus of this blog on Asian Latinos aims to highlight just one example of the under-recognized heterogeneity of Latino culture.


Lulu Jam

Asian/Pacific Islanders have a history in what is now called Latin America that goes back thousands of years to when the descendants of paleo-Siberians crossed the Bering land bridge, headed south from North America and moved into Central and South America. Thousands of years later, Austronesians settled Rapa Nui (sometime between 300 and 1200). Although still fairly far from modern day Chile (although much closer than to their southern Chinese ancestral lands), there is strong evidence that these Polynesians traded with the Mapuche, who live in what is now Chile and Argentina. This has been surmised from several clues. One is the presence of sweet potatoes in Rapa Nui, which are indigenous to South America and in all likelihood couldn't survive a sea voyage without human aid. In addition, the Rapa Nui referred to the islet of Sala y Gómez to Rapa Nui's east as “Manu Motu Motiro Hiva,” meaning, “Bird's islet on the way to a far away land;" that "far away land" is presumably a reference to South America. Finally, in 2007 a group of scientist subjected bones of an Aracuana chicken (dated to have lived between 1304 and 1424) to be tied by its DNA to chickens in Tonga and American Samoa.


It wasn’t until the arrival of the Spanish that the concept of Latin America was created by Romance language-speaking European conquerors. From the the earliest days of conquest, the Spanish were accompanied by Asians. The first significant arrivals from Asia were Filipinos who, as early as 1565, escaped from their Spanish masters and settled mainly in Mexico. Many more Asians followed, primarily Chinese, Indian, Korean and Japanese laborers, the greatest number in the 19th century. In some South American countries today, the populations of Asian citizens aren't just noteworthy, they're dominant. In Dutch-speaking (so therefore not Latin American by most definitions) Suriname, the overwhelming majority of citizens are Asian. In English-speaking Guyana, a plurality are Asian. In French Guiana, 22% of the population are at least in part Asian. Brazil is second only to Japan in numbers of Japanese people.


Ana Gabriel - La Reina

Most Asian Latinos live in South America. Despite their presence in Latin America, where they number over four million, Asian Latinos are still, no doubt, the least recognized racial group among Latinos. In the US, the number of Asian Latinos of Asian ancestry alone is estimated to be around 300,000. Many more Latinos have a mix of ancestries, including Asian. The magazine Revista Oriental, founded in 1931, is still published in Peru and focuses on Asian Latinos there and elsewhere in Latin America. Many Asian Latinos have immigrated to the US, most often in cities like Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco and South Florida.


Liberdade, Sao Paulo

Whereas in Latin America most Asain Latinos are Latino by virtue of their many generations of presence in the region, in the US, Asian Latino culture tends to be the product not of Latino Asian immigrants, but rather from a domestic mix of the two cultures, often in the neighborhoods of the San Gabriel Valley, Gardena, Atlanta, Milwaukee and (historically) Boyle Heights.



Anish (Nara Back)

The difference between centuries of organic fusion and more recent combinations can be seen in the differences of cuisines of Cuba and Peru and the newer, more delibarate Asian-Latino fusion common in the US as evinced by the fare of Kogi BBQ, Asia de Cuba, Cha Cha Chili, Danu, Marazul, Stingray Sushi Bar, Tamari and Asian Latino Grill and Vive

Other examples of the ongoing integration of Asian and Latino cultures in the US can be seen in the solidarity between Filipino and Mexican farmworkers in FALA, art exhibits like Tigers and Jaguars and projects like the Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana’s The Ties that Bind.


Lima, Peru

Many Asian Latinos have made significant contributions to academia, athletics, medicine, politics and, of course, the arts, although, in many cases, their Asian Latino heritage goes unmentioned. In film, as with all Latinos, the notion of Latino homogeneity/interchangability almost always works in the favor of White Hispanics/non-Latinos like Antonio Banderas and Penelope Cruz (or Welsh and Brits like Catherine Zeta Jones, Anthony Hopkins and Alfred Molina), while brown people play background gang members and Asian and black Latinos don't exist. For example, in real life, Paula Crisostomo was a Chilipina (Chicano/Filipina), but in the film Walkout, she was portrayed by the snow white Alexa Vega.

             
The real Paula Chrisostomo (left) and her cinematic version (right)... the resemblence is eerie

Given their population distribution, it's not surprising that most Asian Latinos in film and TV (behind and in front of the camera) are in Latin America, although as the list shows, there are a couple of widely recognized Asian Latinos in Hollywood too.

     
    Aline Nakashima                                          Anderson Lau                                                      Annie Yep

   Daisy Marie 
            Barbara Mori                                         Daniele Suzuki                                           Daisy Marie


Fred Armisen   
                 Fred Armisen                                                     Jeri Lee                                          Jin Yoo-Kim


    
                 Kirk Acevedo                                   Marvin "Trini" Ishmael                      Sabrina Sato Rahal

  
                     Sergio Nakasone                                               Tizuka Yamasaki

Not pictured: Hernán Takeda



Lisa Ono

Asian Latinos in music are more often citizens of Latin American countries, although, as with those in film and TV, this list includes some Americans too. Alberto "Beto" Shiroma, Alfonso Leng, Ana Gabriel (nee María Yong), Anjulie, Arlen Siu, Brownman, Cansei de Ser Sexy’s Lovefoxxx, Carlos Galvan, Cassie Ventura, Cesar Ichikawa, Camillo Wong “Chino” Moreno, Hiromi Hayakawa, Jasmine Villegas, Jorge Peña Hen, Kelis, Kiuge Hayashida, Leonardo Lam, Lisa Ono, Lulu Jam's Nara Back (Anish) and Takaomi Saito, Melinda Lira, Menudo’s Christopher Moy, Michio Nishihara, Pato Fu’s Fernanda Takai, Patty Wong, Sum 41’s Dave Baksh and Kokeshi’s Viviana Shieh/Shuy.


New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 09/18/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 14, 2009 02:11pm | Post a Comment


New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming This Weekend:
dustin zahn stranger to stability rek'd
Dustin Zahn
STRANGER-LEN FAKI REMIX 12"
REKD001

Crazy demand for LEN FAKI's PODIUM remix led to this pressing. HUGE summer techno tune that CARL COX dropped at Space and that wrecked the dance floor. The build ups and drops are INSANE! Also includes the original version and a "X BREAK" mix from FAKI as well. Do not sleep on this!
    


Raza
DETROIT, WORK IT OUT 12"
DP02

Cult like techno imprint invites a former WARP artist to let the music talk under the alias RAZA. State of the art modern techno, sounding as if it was forged in Detroit and finished in Berlin. Three beautiful tracks, fans of ECHOCHORD, STYRAX. Audiophile mastering, vinyl only!
    

Michael Jackson vs Drastics MJAROCKER LP MJAROCKER

Count & Sinden MEGA 12" RUG317T 

Dizzee Rascal HOLIDAY 12" 12STANK006

POET, PUNKER JIM CARROLL (Basketball Diaries) DIES AT AGE 60

Posted by Billyjam, September 14, 2009 01:13pm | Post a Comment

Jim Carroll "People Who Died" 

At the relatively young age of 60, Jim Carroll, the poet and punk rocker best known for his book adapted into the Leonardo DiCaprio-starring movie The Basketball Diaries, and whose most famous song is "People Who Died" (above), himself died a few days ago from a heart attack in his NYC home.
basketball diaries
A key part of the legendary downtown New York art scene in the 1970s, Carroll was known for associating with the likes of Patti Smith, Andy Warhol, and Robert Mapplethorpe. Carroll was also known for his drug use/abuse, never keeping it a secret but rather drawing from it extensively in his writing. First he was a poet and then a musician, on the urging of Patti Smith reportedly. His poems effortlessly morphed into songs such as the aforementioned "People Who Died," which was a poem first and then adapted to music on his much revered 1980 album, Catholic Boy.

The Basketball Diaries was Carroll's autobiographical tale of life as a sports star at an elite Manhattan private high school. He attended on a scholarship. Initially it began as the artist's own personal diary but it soon shaped into a book. The finished novel was first published in 1978 and has remained popular ever since. It became even more widely known after the 1995 film adaptation.

Photographic Memory, Part 2

Posted by Job O Brother, September 14, 2009 12:01pm | Post a Comment
This is another installment of music and/or movies that I’m reminded of when looking at old photos of myself, my family and my friends. It was brought to you by the letter E and the number 8. And through a generous donation from the Karen Silkwood Driving Academy. And from Viewers Like You.


"I hate you."

Here’s a picture of the dude that’s writing the sentence you’re reading right now. It was taken while he was in Kindergarten. The expression on the boy’s face sets the tone for the rest of his scholastic experience.

I don’t know what happened to make me look so surly in a photograph. It could’ve been as simple as the photographer telling me to “Smile!” which is an order I have never responded to well. I mean, if someone wants me to smile, they should be creative about it. Try saying something like:

“I’ve bought you 8 pints of ice cream and a spoon!” or

“I managed to destroy every last recording of the song ‘Entry Of The Gladiators!'” or

“I am John Gavin, and I’m going to kiss you.”

Something that would make me smile for reals. Don’t just bark orders at me! Especially to portray an emotion. That’s too personal. I AM NOT A LABRADOR RETRIEVER, PEOPLE!

Sorry for yelling. But I’m really not a Labrador Retriever, people. So stop throwing dirty tennis balls my way. Just because I always bring them back doesn’t mean I’m enjoying myself, you know. My tail lies.

By Kindergarten age, I was devoted to three albums: Simple Dreams by Linda Ronstadt


Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by… oh, what were they called? Shoot – the name slips my mind, but they were a good band. And finally, Chipmunk Rock by The Chipmunks.


An argument could be made that all the variety I now enjoy in the world of music can be traced back to these three LP’s. That argument would be wrong, but you could make it.


This is a picture I took of Noah Georgeson in front of the now defunct South Yuba Café, then located on Broad Street in downtown Nevada City, California. Working inside the Café was his then-girlfriend who was hooking us up with free ice cream and pasties. (My adolescence would not have been possible without the girls of South Yuba Café feeding me free pasties, actually. Without them, I would have had to get a job, which would have dramatically changed the course of my entire life.)

Noah and I had been in the same freshmen P.E. class at Nevada Union High School, which may account for both of us sharing similar post-traumatic stress disorders. We were also in the same punk band for a while – a lovable little outfit called Inner Frog, which would also include Hunter Burgan on drums, amongst others.

I didn’t, and don’t, know how to play any instruments, so I was what we called “lead Betty Cooper,” that is, I played tambourine and sang back-up vocals. Usually in cut-off jeans and a vintage nurse’s outfit. Conflicts arose after the band’s lead singer (who we’ll call The Virginia Beach Open) started making wild allegations and accused the rest of us of claiming she was making wild allegations.


Noah continued developing lots of music – more than I could name by the time I finish writing this sentence. Of note, he was a member of now disbanded band The Pleased, along with then-girlfriend Joanna Newsom, whose debut album he would produce. Since then, he has also become a regular contributor to the work of Devendra Banhart.


But an album that deserves greater awareness is his solo effort Find Shelter, released in 2006. It’s a dreamy album of dark folk hypnosis. Noah’s vocals are rich, deep and commanding. Don’t be content with his impressive résumé of behind-the-scenesness – check out his album, do.


Finally, here’s a picture of Carmella. I don’t have any musical memories attached to this image, but I did snap this photo in the restroom of the South Yuba Café, so it’s not without relevance. Without taste, yes, but not relevance.

More walks down memory lane to come. Stay tuned!

...Actually, don’t stay tuned. I don’t want you to waste days just sitting at your computer waiting for my next blog. As much as I appreciate your devotion, it’s important to me that you prioritize your own well-being and that of those who depend on you. So let’s just say “check in later” and leave it at that.

Space

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 13, 2009 11:25pm | Post a Comment









The Tarantino Solution 1: Inglourious Basterds (2009), A Moral Defense

Posted by Charles Reece, September 13, 2009 11:00pm | Post a Comment

So, there's been a whole lot of hoo-ha surrounding what's quite obviously the most interesting and entertaining movie of the year, Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds. The moralistic critics have done their best to trivialize the white power movement's Holocaust revisionism by suggesting the film turns "Jews into Nazis" (Daniel Mendelsohn) and one wonders "what it was (and is) about the film that seems morally akin to Holocaust denial" (Jonathan Rosenbaum). On the other, "with friends like these ...," side, the defense hasn't amounted to much, either, the typical suggestion being some variation on the line that as pure entertainiment/fantasy, the movie has no morality, nor does it need it. Patooehy! I agree that entertainment is the film's virtue, but disagree that it occurs at the expense of morality. In fact, its morality grounds and justifies what Mendelsohn and Rosenbaum see as the Jews acting like Nazis, but what I call the aesthetic enjoyment of the film. Thus, I think a moral defense is in order. Be forewarned: MANY SPOILERS WILL OCCUR!


The Dreyfus Affair

What all retributive theories seem to share is the claim that the relation between crime and punishment is (primarily) conceptual (or “internal”). The justification of punishment is that punishment in itself is an appropriate response to crime. [...] Reaffirming the wrongness of the crime is good in itself, good enough (all else equal) to justify the punishment. Telling the truth about a crime is itself an important good.
                      -- Moral philosopher Michael Davis explaining the basic tenet of retributive justice

In his review, Mendelsohn is particularly offended by the final chapter that features Shosanna Dreyfus trapping --  with the aid of her boyfriend, Marcel -- the entire Nazi high command in a theater, then burning it down (referencing some science learned from Hitchcock). The fact that Shosanna is a Jew who barely escaped with her own life after watching a group of Nazis being led by Colonel Hans Landa slaughter her family in chapter one has no bearing on Mendelsohn's indignation. Violence is evidently content-free, the violent what-fer being morally equated to the violent crime. Even the dimmest of ardent capital punishment opponents should be able to free himself from Mendelsohn's mental paper bag here. That is, even if one holds that the state should never be able to kill murderers, it takes quite a bit of willpower to get mixed up on the order of events involved: there would be no state-sanctioned violence without the criminal act of murder occurring first. Now, there might be other good, moral reasons for not wanting the state to kill murderers, but they in no way make the two killings morally equivalent, or equally justified. Similarly, not all vengeful fantasies are the same, either. Here's a thought experiment:

      
Who do you think should be more worrisome to a neighborhood: Little Jason, who dreams of going back in time to assassinate Adolf Hitler before he became Der Führer, or little Eddie, who dreams of one day making all the whores pay for their satanic influence?

Seems pretty clear to me that some dreams of retribution are healthier than others. All too often the revenge fantasy, such as Last House on the Left, is dismissed for the pleasure the audience receives in the violent performance of retribution without considering the basis for said pleasure, namely the retribution itself. As Charles Boyer said in Arch of Triumph regarding his desire to see Charles Laughton's Nazi get his comeuppance, "revenge is a personal thing, this is something bigger." Regardless of the emotive state obtaining to the act of revenge (or its fantasy), the moral question is whether the act is just or not. Maybe it worries you, feeling elated at seeing Hitler's head being reduced to a rotten peach by the Basterds' machine guns. Or maybe, like our concerned symbolic parent Rosenbaum, it worries you that others take delight in such a thing. Worrying about pleasure, like the pleasure itself, is only tangentially related to the morality of Tarantino's fantasy. The relevant questions are: Did the Nazi high command deserve to be burned alive? If so, is there anything wrong with a Jew delivering it? And, given that history had it otherwise, is there anything wrong with fantasizing about Nazis receiving a taste of their own final solution? Since I've already pretty much answered the last question with a 'no,' I won't keep you guessing how I'm going to answer the first two: Yes and no. At least, I'll be arguing these are perfectly moral stances to hold, not to be dismissed as exploitative emotional reactions.

The only good Nazi: Charles Laughton gets his just dessert in Arch of Triumph.

There are many theories of justice (explore at your leisure), but Mendelsohn and Rosenbaum's objections are rooted in retributivism's chief theoretical rival, utilitarianism. That is, we shouldn't even fantasize about treating the Nazis as they treated others, because we lose something of our collective humanity, which is a detriment to the general good. A similar case was recently made on very real grounds by Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill regarding the release of the critically ill convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi to return to Libya where he can die (in 3 months, we're all assured). Notwithstanding al-Megrahi's continuing claim of innocence, MacAskill didn't question the conviction, but made his decision based on compassion being the greater good: "Compassion and mercy are about upholding the beliefs that we seek to live by, remaining true to our values as a people -- no matter the severity of the provocation or the atrocity perpetrated."

What was Zappa's line about hippie love? "I will love everyone. I will love the police as they kick the shit out of me on the street." Yep, compassion for the remorseless sounds like a real virtue, alright. Saad Djebbar, a lawyer for the Libyan government, suggested an alternative utilitarian interpretation of the decision, stemming from realpolitik, rather than compassion: "Rest assured that the (Scottish) government has done the UK government a great favour[.] Britain and Scotland will grow in the eyes of the Arab states."

If that makes you feel icky, you might be a retributivist. The case makes for an interesting contrast to the response of Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni to Madina Amin's request that her husband, the huggable butchering tyrant, General Idi Amin Dada, be allowed to return back home, as he was deteriorating in a coma. Without a lick of supposedly Western compassion, Museveni promised the General would "answer for his sins the moment he was brought back."

Perhaps Museveni should've listened to the words of his fellow Christian, Pope John Paul II, when he recommended to the poor, oppressed people living in General Augusto Pinochet's Chile, "[d]o not let yourself be seduced by violence and the thousand reasons which appear to justify it. [The Church rejects] all ideologies which proclaim violence and hate as means to obtain justice.” Achieve the greater good by turning the other cheek ... as long as it's in opposition to communism, of course. As this fellow suggests in analyzing the former Pope's moral concerns, the "greater good" for His Holiness was the church bureaucracy in Latin America, not the liberation of the people. Thus, nary a critical word was uttered regarding the dictator's murderous days in office. In fact, the Pope personally gave Pinochet communion.

Call me a Billy Jack fan, but I prefer Dietrich Bonhoeffer's conversion to vengeance when he decided to suffer a potential bad ruling at Judgment Day in order to rid the world of Adolf Hitler. Bonhoeffer didn't think he'd be a better person, only that he was willing to suffer to do the right thing. I find it hard to see his desire as unhealthy, or in any way morally equivalent to Hitler's. Violence and violent desire have content. Continuing to play fair with a cheater in a card game isn't going to get you anything but less money; the game has to be stopped. Demanding some money back isn't the same thing as being cheated out of it in the first place. If a person denies you your basic humanity and is willing to act in accordance, he doesn't deserve your compassion.

Page 2

Os Mutantes Live At Amoeba Hollywood 9/8/09

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, September 13, 2009 02:56am | Post a Comment

With every Brazilian Independence Day (Sept. 7th) usually comes a plethora of great Brazilian music to Los Angeles. Still, it was a shock to see Os Mutantes on the Amoeba instore calendar when it was posted back in August. I’m sure it was more of a coincidence than something planned, but In the back of my mind I thought, “How cool is that!?” To say that I’m a fan of Os Mutantes is an understatement; in fact, it's probably one of the few groups that most Amoeba employees with all our collective vast tastes in music can agree upon. Since their reunion, or rather, their resurgence back in 2006, I have managed to miss all their shows in Los Angeles due to plain old bad timing. At last, I would finally see the band that was the gateway for me and so many others to discovering Brazilian music.

In the early nineties, I read an article on Os Mutantes. They were referred to as “The Brazilian Beatles,” but that is not what drew me to them. It was that they, along with the other Tropicalistas Gilberto Gil, Gal Costa, Caetano Veloso and Tom Zé were radicals and into taking all influences, whether they was Brazilian, European, Avant-garde or folk music, and putting them all together. Mutantes were the easiest to digest because they had much in common with other Psychedelic groups of that era, but after listening to them on a continuous basis, I started to notice their musicianship and songwriting was much more advanced than most groups of that time. They were the best of the Avant-garde rock bands because they could swing better than any of them. I remembering going to a record store and buying all their import CDs that I could find. From there I got into Caetano, Gilberto Gil, Tom Ze and soon started to venture out into other non-Tropicalia artist such as Milton Nascimento and Jorge Ben. From then on, the doors of Brazilian music became wide open. My discovery of Brazilian music from Jobim to Funk Carioca is due in part to Os Mutantes.

So, with much anticipation, I waited for their instore performance. Since the reformation of the group, Sergio Dias remains the only original member left. Singer Rita Lee never joined the reunion and Arnaldo Baptista, keyboardist and Sergio’s brother, left a year after the reunion in 2006. Long time drummer Dinho Leme remained in the group with a cast of new players, all which played on the newly released Haih Or Amortecedor CD. The band started show with "Tecnicolor," from the album of the same name. It's not one of their most known songs, as the album was recorded in 1971 and not released until 2001; it caught most of the audience off guard. After that they launched into several of the songs from the new album. I saw lots of confused faces and perhaps some disappointed ones that they were not the band of 1968; however, their new material they played from Haih Or Amortecedor is as adventurous as the music they put out over forty years ago. Einstein said it best many years ago, that “energy is never lost, it’s only transferred.” The new Mutantes forge forward as they always done. To go backwards would be anti-everything the band ever stood for and I commend them on that.

However, when they did play the older songs, they just blew me away. When they launched into "Ando Meio Desligado" from A Divina Comédia, I nearly flipped. I was instantly reminded of that feeling of hearing them for the first time. How I listened to them repeatedly at work, in my car and at home. I've never looked at music the same way since.

Another thing I loved about the group was the sheer joy they were experiencing on stage. I've never seen a band smile as much as them. In an era of young bands with much posturing and posing, Os Mutantes' live show was a breath of fresh air in the smoke-filled Los Angeles skyline.

For more pictures from the instore, click here!

Rats the size of cats

Posted by Whitmore, September 12, 2009 08:47pm | Post a Comment

Rats
the size of a cats and fanged frogs were discovered by Smithsonian Institution biologists working with the Natural History Unit from the BBC in the remote Southern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea in the Mount Bosavi Crater, an extinct volcano. The huge crater, measuring two and half miles wide and rimmed with walls nearly half a mile high, appear to have trapped these creatures inside the isolated crater’s rainforests and they possibly have never been seen by man before.
 
Among the discoveries is a woolly silvery gray rat, weighing nearly 3.5 pounds, and measuring 32 inches from nose to tail, that’s almost three friggin’ feet long! I think I just soiled myself...
 
The Bosavi Crater rat would be one of the largest rats in the world. Most surprising to the BBC documentary team, the rodents were completely tame, a sign that animals were unfamiliar with humans. The rats live on a diet of leaves and roots, and probably build their nests underground beneath rocks and tree roots. A member of the genus Mallomys, these rats have yet to receive their formal scientific name. More than 70 species of rats and mice are found on Papua New Guinea. (And I don’t think I’ll be vacationing there anytime soon.)
 
Altogether, some 40 new species were discovered by the crater expedition, including approximately 16 species of frog, one species of gecko, at least three new species of fish, 20 species of insects and spiders and one new species of bat, plus what may be a new subspecies of tree-living marsupial.
 
The BBC and Smithsonian teams found these previously unknown species while filming a documentary about wildlife of Papua New Guinea. The film, Lost Land of the Volcano, is a three part series which started airing this week in the United Kingdom on BBC One. Below is some footage.

Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo TONIGHT at the New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, September 12, 2009 03:45pm | Post a Comment


Saturday September 12

25th Anniversary!


Breakin' 2:
Electric Boogaloo


Stars Michael Chambers & Lucinda Dickey will appear IN PERSON, schedules permitting, to discuss the film!

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7


Boris' Golden Dance Classics

Posted by Kells, September 12, 2009 01:32pm | Post a Comment

New Boris vinyl. Some of you are drooling at those words and others are heaving a sigh and moving on. The good news is that it's in the store now, stocked in quantity and cheap! The bad news is that there is no bad news unless you think the title Golden Dance Classics bodes ill, and for some of you it will. The A-side consists of two dance-perfect, disco/electronica trips courtesy of 9dw (the artist who initiated this release as a result of their fifteen year friendship with Boris) and the B-side: two new songs from Boris that check into a crossover grey area wherein some decidedly experimental compositions mix loose, simplified electro dance rhythms with Boris' signature guitar-bloodletting, wall of sound hugeness. Don't knock it 'til you've tried it --- I'm pleased to say I like it very much!

If you're afraid to try it, never fear, Boris will be releasing the first in a set of three sequential picture disc 7" records full of new "heavy" works on Southern Lord by month's end (the other two following in October and December) which ought to pack at least one fog-bomb tremblor for all the droners to nod off to (personally I cannot wait to hear the track "Heavy Metal Addict" slated to appear on the October release --- now that is a song I've been supporting 200% since I was thirteen years old). In the meantime, if you're into that pesky "allkindsamusic" genre, which is what happens to most folks who find themselves working in any branch of the music business for any length of time, you'll probably dig on this quirky split from Catune records. 

And if you're attending the very special Flaming Lips curated Boris performance of their outstanding 2003 album Feedbacker in its entirety this Sunday at ATP New York 2009, just pour a little out on the floor for me, mmmkay. Thanks.

PiL TO BE CHANNELED AT AMOEBAPALOOZA HOLLYWOOD

Posted by Billyjam, September 12, 2009 07:08am | Post a Comment
   PiL "Careering" + "Poptones" on American Bandstand, May 1980

The Guardian UK announced this week that the recently reformed John Lydon-led Public Image Limited (PiL) will be performing five announced UK only dates in the coming months. For those who can't make the trip over the pond, the short but exciting planned set by Studio 154 at tomorrow night's (September 13th) Amoebapalooza Hollywood '09 should somewhat satisfy the need to hear the music of the post Sex Pistols Lydon band, whose almost surreal performance (as in "performance" art) on American Bandstand from 1980 is excerpted in the video above. 
As in the PiL TV clip above, Studio 154 will also be performing (not lip syncing) the song "Poptones" as well as music by two other bands in their all too brief 10 minute set scheduled for after 11pm. Comprised of Bob Weider on vocals, Bill Tutton on bass, and Amoebites Greg Griffith on guitar and vocals,, Rick Frystak on  guitar & efx, Rick Frystak, and Marc Weinstein on drums, the band's 3 song set will, in addition to PiL, also include the music of Gang of Four ("Not Great Men") and Wire ("Blessed State"). 
"The Wire song is off the 154 album, so, [it's] a play on words with Studio 54," said Weinstein, adding, "We feel as if this era of minimalist post-punk art rock has been generally under-represented at Amoebapalooza in the past."
As for the actual post-punk band PiL, the newly reformed lineup by Lydon, who you'll recall also regrouped the Sex Pistols in years past, will not include original PiL members Jah Wobble and Keith Levene. Instead it will be made up of late-1980s PiL members Lu Edmonds and Bruce Smith, in addition to Scott Firth, who has played with various pop/rock acts over the years. Read the Guardian UK article linked above for more insights on this reunion.

Meanwhile, among the other 22 acts scheduled (two more than on the flyer) to perform at Amoebapalooza Hollywood tomorrow night are Ben Ricci, The Sonnets, The Zombie Zombies, and Flathead. Click here for more info on Amoebapalooza Hollywood 09.

Witchraft Themed Double At The New Bev Tonight!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 11, 2009 02:10pm | Post a Comment

Two of early cinema's greatest occult themed films will be shown at the New Bev tonight and tomorrow. Haxan and Day of Wrath are both beautifully shot and amazing time capsules. Haxan in particular is as eerie as cinema gets, with its stilted silent era pacing and primitive special effects. Cadaver ghouls, witches' orgies and images from the Compendium Maleficarum (discussed here in one of my very first blogs back in 2007) make for a very interesting travel through the history of Witchcraft through a 1920's lens. An early Halloween treat for sure!


Day Of Wrath

New Beverly Cinema
7165 West Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA  90036
(323) 938-4038

September 11 & 12
Day Of Wrath (1943) Fri 7:30, Sat 3:40 & 7:30
Haxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages (1922) Fri 9:40, Sat 5:50 & 9:40

Haxan

This Week At The New Beverly September 11 - 18

Posted by phil blankenship, September 11, 2009 11:34am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our September / October calendar is now online at
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday September 11 & 12


Day Of Wrath
1943, Denmark, 110 minutes - Recently Restored Print!
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0036506/
dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer, starring Lisbeth Movin, Anna Svierkier, Harald Holst, Preben Lerdorff Rye
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:40 & 7:30

Astonishing in its artistically informed period re-creation as well as its hypnotic mise en scene, it challenges the viewer by suggesting at times that witchcraft isn't so much an illusion as an activity produced by intolerance. - Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP: 09:11:09

Posted by Billyjam, September 11, 2009 11:18am | Post a Comment
jay-z blueprint 3
Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five: 09:11:09

1) Jay-Z The Blueprint 3 (Roc Nation/Atlantic)

2)  Raekwon Only Built 4 Cuban Links Pt II (ICEAL)

3) Large Professor The LP (Red Line)

4) D. Black Ali'Yah (MYX)

5) Dr Dre The Chronic Re-Lit & From The Vaults (Wideawake/Death Row)

Amoeba SF Soul Pick of Week 
Mayer Hawerthorne A Strange Arrangement (Stones Throw)

Not too surprisingly, the anticipated, brand new, star-studded Jay-Z album The Blueprint 3, (aka TB3), which originally was scheduled to come out last year, is this week's number one release on the new hip-hop chart at Amoeba Music. The album features a slew of guest collaborators, including Young Jeezy, Kanye West (in producer mode mainly), Rihanna, Drake, Kid Cudi, Mr Hudson, Swizz Beatz, Pharrell and Alicia Keys, and is the final release in the Blueprint trilogy that began exactly eight years ago on September 11th, 2001 -- the day the Twin Towers were attacked. In fact, that was why initially Jay-Z had scheduled the release of TB3  for today (Friday, September 11th), but then he changed his mind at the last minute, reverting to the typical Tuesday date release. The fifteen track TB3 is the artist's 11th studio album and his first on his own new label Roc Nation.raekwon only built 4 cuban linx pt ii

Hey! It's National Biscuit Month

Posted by Whitmore, September 10, 2009 09:14pm | Post a Comment

It’s September, which of course everybody knows is National Biscuit Month. But wait, what’s a biscuit without a little gravy? Probably dry and sawdust-like, unless you’ve lived a charmed life amongst bakers. Well, not only is it National Biscuit Month, but the second week in September is always observed -- and religiously so in some circles -- as National Biscuit & Gravy Week. So for the next few days, add a little flavor to that otherwise boring brick biscuit. This celebration is obviously not for the weak of heart; participants must of course be cleared by a cardiologist. But B&G week is more than permitting credence to an angio-edge life style, B&G week is here to help us remember good old fashion homemade fixins’. And since cooking at home has gone the way of indoor smoking, Betamax, pull tabs, floppy discs, and glaciers, take some time out in your marathon commuter mornings, hit the local diner, whether it’s a Denny’s or a faux-bohemian hipster dive or a Mom & Pop’s greasy spoon off the health department’s radar, sit down to a breakfast of hot biscuits & gravy, a cup of coffee, ignore your cell phone, leave the laptop in the trunk, and read an actual morning paper, and not a Weekly ... a real daily newspaper with real smudgy newsprint. And as long as you avoid the articles on American politics, you won’t regret the respite!
 
Biscuits and gravy was once just a popular breakfast dish in the South, but its popularity has spread nationwide and is now served for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Think about it, a buttermilk biscuit covered in a piping hot thick "country" or "white" gravy made from the drippings of cooked pork sausage, a little white flour, milk, with bits of real sausage, bacon, or ground beef, flavored with lots of black pepper. I’m heading out right now, and just to keep a balance between my health and my bent for ruin, I’m biking to my favorite greasy spoon. Biscuits & gravy ... live on the edge!
 
Sausage Gravy Recipe
8 ounces breakfast sausage
2 tablespoons shortening or lard
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups milk
salt and pepper, to taste
dash cayenne pepper, optional, but damn good
 
PREPARATION:
Cook sausage in a medium skillet over medium-low heat, stirring and breaking up with a spatula. With a slotted spoon, remove the browned crumbled sausage to a paper towel-lined plate. Add 2 tablespoons shortening, vegetable oil, or lard to the drippings in the skillet.
 
Add flour, stirring until blended and bubbling. Gradually add 1 1/2 cups milk; continue stirring and cooking until thickened and bubbly. Add the crumbled sausage. If too thick, add a little more milk. Taste and add salt and pepper. Stir in a dash of cayenne pepper, if desired.
 
Serve over hot split and buttered biscuits.

Amoeba SF + Beatles Day = PARTY!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, September 10, 2009 03:09pm | Post a Comment





Well, 09.09.09 has come and gone, and we here at Amoeba San Francisco partied like it was 1964! Beatles Day was enthusiastic and joyful, as customers and employees came together to celebrate probably the most significant band the world has ever seen. If you missed out on the action, allow me to describe some of it for you!

Before the store opened, there was a line of customers waiting on baited breath to get their hands on the mono box set -- I sold the last copy at 11:30, so they went fast! The limited edition box set includes the first 10 Beatles album in their original mono glory, plus all their mono-mixed singles on a disc and many other special goodies. A customer and I had a conversation about how very different the mono mixes of Beatles songs and albums are, including different "oinks" on "Piggies!" Beatles die-hards say you haven't heard The Beatles yet if you haven't heard them in mono, since most of their records were originally mixed and released in mono! And those die-hards were finally satisfied yesterday, at last grabbing every Beatles album in mono in one giant swoop with the new box set.

DJs took to the Amoeba stage from 11am on, playing their own mixes of The Beatles music from the early years to the end, and including sets of covers, b-sides and solo career cuts. It's amazing that we could play only Beatles/Beatles-related music from 11am-6pm and cover so much territory -- considering The Beatles were only around and recording for less than 10 years, the amount and breadth of the music they created is mind-blowing.

Coffee Bar films - Between skiffle and beat, a short-lived scene percolated

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 10, 2009 02:08pm | Post a Comment

In the 1950s, Britiain's teenagers were exposed to a lot more American culture than they were perhaps previously used to. Disparate strains of American culture including beatniks, teenage rebellionrock 'n' roll and coffee all got mashed up in one slightly confused and frothy concoction. Leather-favoring motorcycle enthusiasts who embraced the scene were labeled coffee bar cowboys. F




or the aspiring juvenile delinquents and those just out for kicks, alcohol was suddenly the choice of squares and java joe was the way to go, dad! Soon, the English were brewing their own strain of rock 'n' roll in Soho "caffs" (most famously, The 2 i's). Of course, as with any proper youth movement, exploitation films inevitably followed.


The Tommy Steele Story (1957)



"He traveled the world listening to the musical heartbeat of people everywhere and he came home with his head and heart full of songs that captivate all who hear."

The Golden Disc (1958)


Serious Charge (1959)


Beat Girl (1959)







Expresso Bongo (1959)






Amoeba Hollywood's Beatles Day Celebration

Posted by Amoebite, September 10, 2009 01:40pm | Post a Comment

Number nine. Number nine. Number nine. Yes, 9/09/09 was Beatles Day at Amoeba Hollywood, and fans lined up before opening to purchase the long-awaited stereo and the mono box sets (the mono sets sold out at 1pm), plus sundry standalone albums and other Beatles “stuff.” (It must have been the Bob Smeaton documentary that was included in the stereo set, right?) Beatles songs were played throughout the day in their upgraded forms (miraculous), and the atmosphere was festive from the time the store opened until late. It was like an actual holiday, a warm eggnog and feety-pajamas feeling...only with a guy who looked like John Lennon (circa his Lost Weekend era) staying for the duration, and a couple of employees dressed in Sgt. Pepper’s regalia.




Beginning at 1 o’clock, Amoeba’s own Daniel (of Mandala fame) took the microphone and hosted Beatles trivia on the hour until 4 o’clock. His accent swayed between Brummie and Sherman Oaks, but he definitely looked like one of the Lonely Hearts Club Band. He even sported a vintage mustache. A throng holding cardboard fans stood in eager anticipation to prove they knew Ringo’s middle name and that Paul is a birthpath 4 Gemini and that he’s the exact same height as Lolo Ferrari. This crowd could not be stumped—though Daniel tried his best. One of the questions he asked was “what is ‘you’ referring to in the song ‘Got to Get You Into My Life?’” This set off a torrent of people going “ooh-ohh-oh” with their arms stretching to heaven. The answer was, of course, Chong, from Cheech and Chong (or, the green leaves that made Chong Chong)! With each right answer, Elicia (drums) and Becca (sax), also in garb, played some fizzling dying thing as a show of triumph.

Number 9…Number 9…Number 9…

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, September 10, 2009 01:05pm | Post a Comment
By James Leon


It was 20 years ago when The Beatles’ discography was first released on compact disc, and since then, they have been left untouched (with the exception of Let It Be…Naked). However, on 09.09.09, their albums have been re-released and remastered individually or in limited edition box sets available in both stereo and mono! All 3 Amoeba stores celebrated this with giveaways, DJs and the support of Beatlemaniacs!

The Berkeley Branch had its leaves shaking with the Fab 4’s music all day long. At 1pm, DJ JoNasty played favorite songs of the Liverpool quartet, as well as some of their solo work and covers by others. At 2pm, the giveaways began with MC Emily announcing each of the trivia questions, at the top of every hour.

berkeley 09.09.09

At 4pm, DJ Ken Kubla took over the decks, playing songs that inspired The Beatles, ones they covered or people covering their material.


Here are the trivia questions:

1)    Who was the original drummer for the Beatles?
2)    Which songs have the word “walrus” in the lyrics?
3)    How many times did [they] appear on the Ed Sullivan Show?
4)    In which song has their one & only drum solo?
5)    What was the working title for “Yesterday?"
6)    Which Beatle met his future wife while filming A Hard Day’s Night? What was her name?

out this week 8/18 & 8/25 & 9/1...jack penate...frankmusik...arctic monkeys...radiohead...the smiths...

Posted by Brad Schelden, September 10, 2009 12:11pm | Post a Comment

I can't believe it's time for another Jack Penate album already. This year has gone by so fast. I really fell in love with Jack Penate and his debut album from last year Matinee. It was one of those fun albums that just made me feel good when I listened to it. It was not my normal sort of album that I would become obsessed with, but I listened to it a lot and it really grew on me. It was one of those albums that most people didn't get around to listening to-- I feel like it was a bit forgotten among all the other releases from last year. I really recommend that you go back and discover it, or just listen to his new album Everything Is New. It is as good as the first album in many ways, but it also makes some improvements on that first record. It is for sure more produced and polished, so you may just end up liking the first record better, depending on you taste. The first record seemed more like a pub record -- an album you would listen to in your favorite pub or bar. But the new record is more of a club record; it is a bit more dancey than the first. I love them both, just for different reasons. They both serve their purpose and are both great albums on their own. I am a big fan of his voice and it is what keeps me coming back to these records. He is also a great songwriter. These are some catchy songs that will stay with you.

Here is a video for "Spit at Stars" from his first album Matinee...


and here is a video for "Be the One" from the new album Everything is New...



I often want artists to just put out a second album that is the same as the first, like just an extra 10 or 12 jack penatesongs that could have easily been on the first album. It is hard to get that same feeling for a second album that you have for a debut. Bands like The Arctic Monkeys and The Strokes could never repeat that feeling of their first albums. Maybe it is just because it is so exciting and new at first. It is so much fun getting excited about a new band. You also have great expectation for that second album. Your expectations are usually too high so you will never be satisfied by that second album. It just becomes impossible for the artist to deliver with that second album. It is just better for an artist to try to do something different for the second and third album. Still, creating an album that has the elements that made you fall in love with the first one is important in a way, while simultaneously creating new sounds and styles that give you the same kind of excitment that you had for the first album. Jack Penate manages to pull it off. The album is completely different from the first but it manages to get me excited just like that first album did. It is not an easy task to pull off, and more often than not, most second albums fail to pull it off, so it frankmusik complete memakes it even more fantastic when it happens. I am loving the new Jack Penate. You could easily fall in love with it without even hearing that first album. I am almost starting to forget it even existed.
 
My most recent favorite is Frankmusik. His debut album Complete Me just came out as an import. It quickly became my favorite of the year after my first listen. I had watched a couple of videos before I picked up the album so I already knew I would probably love it -- I just didn't know how much. It is one of those albums made just for me. It combines all the things I love about 80's new wave and 90's dance music, and it manages to get rid of all the bad things that some artists forget to get rid of. Frankmusik is Frank Turner. It should come as no surprise that he is from the UK. This is where most of my favorite music seems to come from, back in the 80's and still to this day. The album is pure electro pop -- music made to make you feel good and dance. It makes perfect sense that he was the opener for The Pet Shop Boys for some shows in Europe. I have been listening to the album over and over again the last couple of weeks and I have been trying to think of what to compare it to. I just can't get Hall & Oates out of my head whenever I listen to this album. It might not seem the obvious comparison at first, but his voice is very similar and the songs could easily be Hall & Oates songs. I think there is a very similar strong structure and even the lyrics are very similar. I really think Frankmusik should do a whole album of Hall & Oates covers. Or maye just a song. I could really go for a cover of "Maneater" or "Private Eyes." Try to imagine Hall & Oates combined with Daft Punk, Marc Almond, and Patrick Wolf. This is what Frankmusik sounds like. There is not a bad song on the album. There are some more ballady type tracks on the album, but I love them all. It is a perfect album to end the summer with.

Here is the video for "Confusion Girl" by Frankmusik...



and here is the video for "Better Off As Two" (try to imagine Hall & Oates singing this exact same song)...




Here is the Hall & Oates video for "Maneater" (just in case you forgot the pop brilliance of Hall & Oates)...


and here is the video for "Private Eyes" (just in case you can't get enough Hall & Oates after watching that first video)...



also out 8/18...






Hospice by The Antlers









Love (Expanded Edition) by The Cult











Watch Me Fall by Jay Reatard











This Is For the White In Your Eyes by Choir of Young Believers











Wind's Poem by Mount Eerie











Luminous Night by Six Organs of Admittance











Inglourious Basterds Soundtrack







also out 8/25...






Humbug by Arctic Monkeys











My Guilty Pleasure by Sally Shapiro











Hail to the Thief (Collectors Edition) by Radiohead











Amnesiac (Collectors Edition) by Radiohead











Kid A (Collectors Edition) by Radiohead











Black River Killer by Blitzen Trapper











Whatever It Takes by Sandra Bernhard











No More Stories are Told Today Sorry... by Mew











My Weakness is Strong by Patton Oswalt










Vinyl Reissues by The Smiths!!! (The Smiths, Meat is Murder,             Queen is Dead, Strangeways Here We Come)







also out 9/1...






Curse Your Branches by David Bazan











Terra Incognita by Juliette Lewis











Solo Electric Bass by Squarepusher






September 9, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, September 9, 2009 11:20pm | Post a Comment



A little 999 on 09-09-09

Posted by Whitmore, September 9, 2009 08:35pm | Post a Comment

I know it’s officially Beatles Day across this great rock and roll landscape, but I can’t resist posting a couple of video’s from a great band from the 1970’s, 999, on this day -- 09-09-09. Named after the UK’s emergency telephone number, they were formed in London at the onset of the punk scene in 1977. 999 charted five Top 75 singles between 1978 and 1981, though only one made it to the Top 40; that track is the classic "Homicide" / "Soldier," released in October of 1978 on United Artist Records. Other great mad romps include "Nasty Nasty," "Found Out Too Late" and "Emergency." One early review complained they were “histrionic, the music embarrassingly simple, the instruments turned up to full volume and the production almost absent;” yeah, that sounds just about perfect in my book.



TOM SCHARPLING ON HIS PAUL McCARTNEY RAM ALBUM TRIBUTE

Posted by Billyjam, September 9, 2009 03:35pm | Post a Comment
paul mccartney ram
Everyone loves The Beatles, incuding radio DJ / comedian / televison writer Tom Scharpling, who has long favored Paul McCartney as his favorite of the Fab Four. Scharpling, who hosts the briilliant weekly WFMU 3 hour live radio program The Best Show on WFMU, considers McCartney's post Beatles, May 1971 release RAM (with wife Linda McCartney) to be one of the artists' finest works.

In fact, Scharpling was so into the album, which is often unfairly dismissed by critics, that he had the wonderful idea of producing a RAM covers tribute compilation, inviting his many musician friends to contribute to the project.The final product would be a special WFMU only release made out of love for McCartney, as well as for WFMU, as it helped raise funds (which it did very well) for the New Jersey radio station's annual fundraising pledge drive marathon earlier this year. 

Renamed TOM, and with a cleverly altered cover, the new tribute RAM is a sincere track-by-track reinterpretation of the 38 year old release with such artists as Ted Leo, Death Cab for Cutie, Aimee Mann, Portastatic, Danielson, Dump (Yo La Tengo's James McNew), Spider Bags, Black Hollies, and Stones Throws' James Pants, all pitching in their time and talent to help out the popular radio host and the non-profit independent radio station.
Tom Scharrpling
I recently caught up with Tom Scharpling, whose show really is The Best Show on WFMU and one I never miss! It airs every Tuesday 8pm to 11pm EST on WFMU. I talked with him about the concept for the album, the artists' attitudes towards McCartney, and also his reaction to the similarly themed Ram on L.A. album that was released around the same time as his RAM tribute.

Amoeblog: How did you first get the idea to do this RAM themed compilation?

Here, There, and Everywhere: It's Beatles Day

Posted by Kells, September 9, 2009 09:58am | Post a Comment

So, it's Beatles Day, big deal. No, really, it's a big deal! Think about it, what other band has earned their very own special day of celebration? That's right, no other band, because like it or not the Beatles are, have been and probably forever will be just that special. I cannot speak personally about any particular Beatles revelation in my early life, the best I can do being that in my formative years I remember reading interviews with guys from the bands I liked in magazines like Rip and Metal Edge where they'd always, always cite the Beatles as a major musical influence right along side bands like the New York Dolls, Deep Purple and Uriah Heap. I took note, but skipped the breakthrough introductory listen --- my excuse being that Mötley Crüe's version of "Helter Skelter" was enough Beatles for me.

It wasn't until the late 1990's that I finally got the message via Revolver. I listened to it repeatedly for, well, how do you measure time when you've got a new favorite record on repeat? I felt like I finally understood why that "Fab Four" band meant so much to so many and I liken the feeling to recognizing blind love for something after having lived so long in its shadow. I fell for them Beatles pretty hard, but I also kept it a secret. I mean, how would you break your fledgeling Beatles romance to a jaded herd of veteran music-retailer colleagues and still expect to be included in all their future reindeer games? My secret was safe, but one of my most precious Beatles moments was yet to come.

Fast forward to a humid summer night during the mid-oughts and a quaint little English pub I visited with some old friends and a few new faces while out on the town in merry olde Osaka, Japan. The Cavern Club, located in Osaka's very entertaining Umeda neighborhood, is a Tudor-style establishment imported brick by brick from old Britannia herself and features live Beatles cover bands every night and has been doing so, with ever so much attention to detail (haircuts and matching costumes, people!), for over twenty years. The deal is this: you pay a cover that includes a drink or two and then you sit back, relax and get your nostalgia on. If you feel so inclined, use one of the song request forms at your table to choose a song, fill in your name and where you're from, then give it to the waitstaff --- they pass it on to the band and, as the forms are blank, please feel free to request any Beatles song you wish!

I wasted no time in filling out my form, requesting my all time favorite Beatles song, "I'm Only Sleeping." I remember thinking that they might not play it and duly prepared myself for a bit of disappointment. I recalled those many times I spent searching for that title among the pages of Beatles songs listed in karaoke boxes, never once seeing it printed on the page as a possible choice. Besides, though the band had not listed a selection to choose from, how could they know every song in the Beatles catalogue? How could they be ready to get down and jam on any and every random "yes, please!" that comes their way? I'm glad I got all worked up thinking about it because when the band slammed, or I should say eased, into my request minutes after I turned it in I was floored by the quality of the performance. They played superbly with faces that shone with satisfaction for the music they made even though it wasn't their own. And do you know what? They even worked in that crazy backwards guitar part that happens in the middle of the song without any hint of force or awkwardness. And to top it all off, they mentioned me after the song and seemed tickled that my request came all the way from San Francisco. I was simply pleased they could read my Japanese. Aside from such lasting memories as bonding with friends over an a cappella rendition of "Strawberry Fields Forever" in the back of a New York City cab to eavesdropping on a hilarious, long-winded argument between two people at Amoeba over whether or not it is possible to reduce the White Album from two discs to one and still retain the overall quality of the whole recording, the fondness I carry for that strange and enjoyable night at the Cavern Club in Osaka makes it my number one Beatles-related experience. 

Here is a sampling of some live at the Cavern Club clips, but please do look this special place up if you're ever in Osaka (or in Tokyo's chic Roppongi district --- they have a second location there too) because, there, every day is Beatles Day. 







Happy Beatles Day: 9/9/09 Remastered Beatles For Sale

Posted by Billyjam, September 9, 2009 09:22am | Post a Comment

The Beatles On Record (excerpt 3)

Happy Beatles Day! Today, 9/9/09, is the much anticipated Beatles Day and Amoeba Music is celebrating the occasion in style with fun Fab Four related activities at each store all day today, and of course the Beatlesnewly remastered Beatles music is finally here. Beatles Day means that that digitally remastered Beatles catalog, which has been talked about for ages, is now available to buy at Amoeba Music.

The reissued, remastered Beatles catalog, which is worth getting for old and new Beatles fans alike, includes all of the Beatles CDs packaged with replicated UK album art, expanded booklets with original and newly written liner notes, rare photos and more good stuff. And note that at Amoeba you can get a free Beatles limited edition litho with your purchase today of two or more Beatles remastered CDs while supplies last. 

But regardless of whatever you plan on buying Beatles-wise today, swing by Amoeba Music's Beatles Day celebration, which includes special Beatles DJ sets, trivia giveaways, Beatles look-alike contests, Beatles auction an more stuff. For more information on exact Beatles Day schedules at each store, scroll down or click here, and read the numerous recent Beatles 2009 Amoeblogs.


Structures

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 8, 2009 11:00pm | Post a Comment


The structure pictured on the Virgin Prunes label above looks a lot like some of the carnage that our recent wildfires created. Below we have a couple of takes on the Capitol Records building. 







I've covered skylines in another post, but since then I've found quite a few more. Below we've got yet another take on the Capitol building.





Thoughts On Abbey Road

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 8, 2009 07:37pm | Post a Comment
 

An iconic studio and my favorite Beatles album. I remember first hearing Abbey Road when I was a child. It introduced me to music that stood apart from anything I had ever heard before. Beautiful melodies captured me, and every time my mother listened to it I wanted more. Playful and dramatic, it showed me how real feelings were connected with music. It helped me get through my piano lessons and escape to adventure town. I don't know how I would have connected to music if it wasn't for Abbey Road. I do know that it was an education for me. The lesson plan was to fall in love with music and decide that I wanted to be involved with it at every level. This is something that I feel I have achieved throughout my life.


   Tracklisting:

"Come Together"  
"Something"  
"Maxwell's Silver Hammer"  
"Oh! Darling"  
"Octopus's Garden"  
"I Want You (She's So Heavy)"  
"Here Comes the Sun"  
"Because"  
"You Never Give Me Your Money"  
"Sun King"  
"Mean Mr. Mustard"  
"Polythene Pam"  
"She Came in Through the Bathroom Window"  
"Golden Slumbers"  
"Carry That Weight"  
"End, The"  
"Her Majesty"  



This Wednesday, 09/09/09, I encourage everyone to connect or reconnect with Abbey Road. Believe the 
hype! It will truly be a monumental day in music. Go forth to all Amoeba locations! You will be serviced professionally and to your greatest expectation. Amoeba delivers what YOU want. 

R.E.M. LENDS SONG TO MOVEON.ORG FOR POWERFUL MESSAGE VIDEO

Posted by Billyjam, September 8, 2009 12:34pm | Post a Comment

R.E.M.
just gave their song "You Are the Everything" -- which first appeared on the group's 1988 album Green (Warner) --  to MoREM GreenveOn.Org to use as the soundtrack to the recently completed moving message video that tackles the stalemate that American health care reform currently finds itself in. The video, co-edited and compiled by Laura Dawn, is a slide show of average Americans who need health care or have family members and friends who need it but simply (like so many of us) cannot afford it under the current system. 

Laura tells me that the video, which was made out of desperation to alert people to the seriousness of the need for adequate health care immediately, has a very straightforward message: "We can't afford to wait for real health care reform, that our friends and neighbors and fellow citizens should never have to get sick or die due to an inability to get health care--if you believe health care is a right and not a priviledge only for the wealthy." She added that the video includes "Thousands and thousands of MoveOn members submitting the pictures in this video," but due to the overwhelming response only a small percentage made the final cut. For more info on this issue click here.

BBC CELEBRATING BEATLES WEEK WITH LOTS OF GREAT CONTENT

Posted by Billyjam, September 8, 2009 10:45am | Post a Comment
The Beatles, BBC documentary

Just as the Amoeblog has been doing here on the West Coast, over in the UK the BBC is also celebrating the Fab Four with its ongoing Beatles Week that includes lots of rare footage and interviews. One of the many highlights of the week, which began on Saturday, is the great seventy minute documentary The Beatles: The First US Visit, which follows John, Paul, George, and Ringo during those infamous two weeks in 1964 when the Beatles invaded America. They were filmed by David and Albert Maysles, who were granted an intimate behind the scenes view of the group in varied settings..
Beatles
Over their fortnight of filming, the director brothers captured Beatlemania as it rapidly took hold of America, thanks in great part to their appearance / performance on The Ed Sullivan Show, which reached 73 million television viewers (something that could never happen nowadays with the media pie cut up into so many more pieces).

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 09/11/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, September 7, 2009 03:26pm | Post a Comment


New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming This Weekend:

Antislash
VERTIGES EP 12"
FRANKIE047

"LENDEMAIN DE FETE" is a shaky tool, with deep atmoshperes and a nice flip mid-track to get lost in. Bleepy and trippy stuff. Sick arrangements on the b-side with killer snares and sounds that are weird and twisted. Not your run of the mill techno-tech house here.  
 
  
Ninjasonik
SOMEBODY GONNA GET PREGNANT WHITE LABEL 12" PR01

White label 12" on the hipster club tip. Includes “SHOOT THE LAZER,” a raunchy club tune that jacks the opening to a certain animated movie classic, and “DAYLIGHT,” a bootie remix of the MATT AND KIM song by the same name. Rounding out the 12” is “STIR,” a minimal dancefloor tune with stuttering, drunken style vocal takes.    

A-Skillz INSANE BANGERS #8-N.THAYER 12" INSANE008

Big Pimp Jones 
BAD BAD JIMMY RUCKUS LP FSRLP058

Various 
REGROOVED SERIES 9 12" GG18 

Bent 
ALWAYS 2009 REMIXES 12" GAE010

Coldplay 
LIFE IN TECHNICOLOR-JTV RMX 12" LITJTV1

Dr. Stereo 
HEAR THE DIFFERENCE 7" JTP019 

Florence Trapp 
LOVE CAME INTO MY LIFE 7" SOUL7009 

Jahcoozi 
NAMEDROPPER 12" BB3

Keisa Brown 
DANCE MAN 7" JM071

New Mastersounds 
SAN FRANTICO 7" ONR7006

Pilocka Krach DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR 12" STD102    



New House/Disco 12"s Coming This Weekend:

Drivetrain
TRAGEDY PARK 12"
YORE002LTD

You can tell that Detroit's DRIVETRAIN has a soft spot for 70s Philly soul and funk. Includes "THE RAIN," the SERENITY mix of "ANGEL," and the title cut. There's everything from jacking to deep techno on this EP, with dub-influenced house pulses, and sweet soulful rhythms. 
   


Retro-Grade
MODA 12"
RETROGRADE1

Modern Italo disco done by SERGE SANTIAGO and his pal TOM NEVILLE. A ltd edition (500) taster for a RETRO-GRADE album due in 2010. Synth laden Italo disco grooves.
  

Chaz Jankel I COME ALIVE 12" CJ001

Various 
TRIBE SESSION SAMPLER TWO 12" TRIBEEP002

Aaron Carl 
RAIN (FT. ERICA LA FAY) 12" WMAC29

Adam Kesher 
CONTINENT 10" DP31

Ali Nasser 
STARS OF RA-LEON REMIX 12" SWS003

An-2 
FROM NOW ON 12" THEOM011

Cevin Fisher 
THE FREAKS COME OUT #2 12" SUB112TR

Filsonik 
DAY THREE-ALEXANDER ROSS 12" TD03

Floating Points 
VACUUM EP 12" EGLO002

Grant Nelson 
BRAVE NEW WORLD 12" CITY1081

Invasion 
SPELLS OF DECEPTION 10" THISIM015

Magik Johnson 
THE FEELING EP 12" HYS1819

Roe O vs Monk One 
EXTRA SPECIAL CATEGORY 7" DP005

Soul Purpose 
KEY ISSUES VOL.2 12" SP011

Steve Bug 
THE LAB 02 SAMPLER 01 12" LAB002A

Tiefschwarz 
TRUST REMIXES 12" SOUVENIR020    



New Dubstep/Jungle 12"s Coming This Weekend: 

Others 
KING PIN 12"
DP030

This ultra-wobbly, big bassbin beast is gonna rock the dubstep dancefloors hardcore, while "SPLINTER IN MY SOUL" is a much softer side of these artists, with delicate keys swirling around a beautiful melody.

Trolley Snatcher 
THE FUTURE 12"
DP031

The title cut & B-side "SCATTAH" are both strong in the vein of wobbley dubstep beasts.

Big Bud CONNECTIONS 3LP FILMLP004

John & Jehn 
LOOKING FOR YOU 12" DUMB016DJC01

Ras G 
DESTINATION THERE EP 12" RAMP024

Rogue State 
LOGICAL REGRESSION 12" R8005

Rusko 
ACTON DREAD 12" DP009

Various Productions 
HOW CAN YOU STAND 7" BLAZE45168

White Lies DEATH - CHASE & STATUS RX 12" WHITE1    

Photographic Memory, Part 1

Posted by Job O Brother, September 7, 2009 01:17pm | Post a Comment

"Please conjure sheets of paper to come floating out of the laundry basket below"
The author, circa 1996

I have recently come into possession of my adolescent photo collection. There was, for a period of about five years, a time when I owned a fetching Ricoh camera which had been given to me by a rad woman whom I lived with on a mountaintop commune on the outskirts of Santa Fe, New Mexico. She used to regale me with stories from her years as a hot-shot publicist, and explained to me which lines from David Bowie’s “Drive-in Saturday” had been written about her by the Thin White Duke.


Were these claims true? Who knows. But it did distract me from the profound and crippling nervous breakdown I was experiencing at the time, fuelled in part by excessive use of ecstasy as a means of spiritual enlightenment and by living with my then step-father who made such helpful suggestions as, “Maybe you have alien implants in your brain.”

“Oh, yes. Well thank you for that.”

I thought it might be fun to dip into the box and see what musical and/or cinematic associations they bring. Kind of reconsider my colorful past in terms of stuff you could purchase at Amoeba Music. For I am a salesman, ladies and gentlemen.

Let’s begin now…


Here’s a picture of me caked in drying mud on the banks of the Dead Sea. Taking the picture is my Mom, who is also slathered in earth. Supposedly there was some physical benefits in doing this, but honestly I didn’t need a reason beyond getting to rub mud all over my near-naked body. Who needs the added incentive of a health boost? What you don’t see in this picture is the gaggle of Japanese tourists shrieking with laughter as the women in the group got smeared with mud by their husbands. And what you don’t hear is that the spa where this all took place is playing Marianne Faithfull’s album Broken English over the loudspeakers. Because when you’re soaking in mineral baths and having the toxins flushed from your body, what else do you want to hear but this…


Yes, the spirit of the Essenes is alive and well on the banks of the Dead Sea.


Here’s a picture of Emilie Autumn. Emilie was famous in our hometown for a variety of reasons, one of which being that she would do things like, say, dye her skin green and wear Christmas tinsel hair extensions. This isn’t body paint, folks. This is skin dyed green, and over the course of weeks it would gradually fade away, as though Emilie were transforming from Frankenstein monster to human girl.

I spent a sizable chunk of my youth locked in Emilie’s room, smoking pot, drinking Thunderbird, eating pot, and making art with her. Music was always playing, and the most popular tunes were (in no particular order):














After being best friends for three years, Emilie and I began having sex, which made the next three years of our relationship a more stormy affair. Her creativity extended into ways of breaking my heart and I finally stopped talking to her. She was one of the great loves of my life and a part of me will always be in love with her. Green skinned or not.

Aw... More to come!

Noir Nites At The New Bev

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 6, 2009 08:55pm | Post a Comment

This month the New Beverly has put together a couple of impeccable noir nights for September. First up is a Sam Fuller pairing, The Crimson Kimono & Underworld U.S.A. Kimono features great Little Tokyo location shots as well as the trailblazing James Shigeta. His Detective Kojaku character is a true rarity-- an Asian American hero / romantic lead character played by an Asian American!! The following week the New Bev is showing an atomic scare double, featuring the infamous KIss Me Deadly as well as the little known gem City of Fear. KIss Me Deadly is absolute must see; it stars the totally underrated Ralph Meeker in a Mike Hammer role that puts all other attempts to shame. Amazing bachelor pad gagetry & awesome location shots keep the bizarre plot moving at a great pace. City of Fear is yet another Vince Edwards masterpiece featuring more LA location shots, Cobalt, shoe stores and a whole lot of sweat...   




Crimson Kimono clip

New Beverly Cinema
7165 West Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA  90036
(323) 938-4038

September 9 & 10

The Crimson Kimono (1959) 7:30
Underworld U.S.A. (1961) 9:15

September 15 & 16
Kiss Me Deadly (1955) 7:30
City Of Fear (1959) 9:35

Kiss Me Deadly trailer

A Starr is Reborn: Ringo Starr, Thespian

Posted by Charles Reece, September 6, 2009 08:30pm | Post a Comment
Not content with merely playing himself in Hard Day's Night (1964) and Help! (1965), Ringo Starr began to develop his acting chops over the next decade and a half, culminating in his masterpiece, Caveman. As a drummer, he was used to being in the background supporting others, and his acting style was such that he always made everyone else seem a little better. He was a chameleon, the rock and roll Peter Sellers. So here's a look back at some of his finest moments during those cinematic years.

Candy (1968)


As the Mexican gardener Emmanuel, Ringo goes toe-to-toe with Richard Burton in Terry Southern and Buck Henry's free love revision of Voltaire's Candide (based on Mason Hoffenberg's novel)

Magic Christian (1969)


Ringo's second Southern collaboration, an adaptation of the latter's novel of the same name. In this scene, Ringo can be seen with Sellers and a young John Cleese.

200 Motels (1971)

>Examine text adventure - Ask will Generation Text revive the popularity of text-based adventures?

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 6, 2009 02:37pm | Post a Comment

Like silent films, old time radio, male grooming and slide shows, the text-based game is a largely dead art form. Like the other examples, it's uniquely enjoyable and was snuffed out by its flashier, less imaginative offspring in the pursuit of realism and technology. (Don't get me wrong, I think GUIs are la mamá de Tarzán and I even crossed the security line at Xerox PARC on a nerd's tour of historic Silicon Valley to drink from the fountain where the Xerox Alto was born back in 1973.) But the quiet pleasures of text games are enjoyable in their own right and with a whole generation almost incapable of communicating through any means except texting, the text game seems ripe for a comeback.

 

Instead of using graphics, text-based games use prose to tell the story. Players type specific commands to such as "go north" to play. A lot of the fun (and frustration) comes from having to type them precisely. For example, if you type "omg go north lol!!!," the computer will reply, "You used the word north in a way I don't understand." It may be frustrating at first to not punctuate every command with "lol," but once you get the hang of it, you'll find text games can be highly addictive. Besides, frustration puts hair on your chest.


The fact that there are no pictures can make physically creating a map with a pencil and paper neccessary. It also requires using your imagination and problem solving that you may not be accustomed to. Text games can be very challenging and sometimes you may want to type an expletive. If you do, the programmers have in nearly all cases thought of that and you might get a response like, "Not right now. I'm tired."

  

The earliest text games were created for mainframe computers in the 1960s, allowing multiple users to play online. Adventure was the first widely-played MUD (or multi-user dungeon) and set the standard for text games that followed. Over the years, text games were continually modified and ultimately many of them ended up being ported to personal computers. I, for one, greatly enjoyed The Sumer Game, and most of all, Oregon Trail, on our family's Apple ][e... and Zork on the TRS-80.

 

Here's a by-no-means-complete list of some of the more significant text games which debuted on mainframes:

BBX (1961), The Sumer Game (1969), Highnoon (1970), Basbal, Oregon Trail and Star Trek (all 1971), Hunt the Wumpus and Star Trek (both 1972), dnd and Dungeon (both 1975), Colossal Cave Adventure (1976), Empire, Mystery Mansion, Oubliette and Zork (all 1977), Acheton and Decwar (both 1978), Avatar Battlestar, Brand X, HAUNT, Martian Adventure and New Adventure (all 1979), Hexarin, Kingdom of Hamil, Monsters of Murdac, Quondam and Rogue (all 1980), LORD (1981), FisK (1982), Avn, Castle and Dunnet (all 1985), Fylfeet (1986), Crobe, MIST, Nidus and Quest of the Sangraal (all 1987), Spysnatcher (1989), and Rise to Glory (1997)

  

When personal computers began appearing in homes around the turn of the '80s, programmers like Scott & Alexis Adams, Don Daglow, Jonathan Partington, Jon Thackray and others began professionally making text-based games for the new market. Anyone that was familiar with programming languages could make their own with relative ease. I wrote my own, Voyage to Zeus, based on the bizarre imagination of my younger cousin, Carly. What I wouldn't do to have a copy of that! Big companies like Adventure International, Infocom, Synapse Software (who referred to text games as "electronic novels"), Melbourne House/Beam Software, Angelsoft, Topologika and Spectral Associates spun what had once been an amateur hobby for a few nerds into commercial gold. In 1982, games with graphics became popular, but as this partial list suggests, popular text games continued into the '90s.



Adventureland, Pirate Adventure
(1978), Voodoo Castle (1980), C.I.A. Adventure, Eamon and Mission Impossible (all 1980), The Count, Ghost Town, Madness and the Minotaur, Mystery Fun House, Pyramid of Doom, Saigon: The Final Days and Strange Odyssey (all 1981), Deadline, The Golden Voyage, The Hobbit, Savage Island and Starcross (1982), Enchanter, Forbidden Quest, Infidel, Suspended - A Cryogenic Nightmare, The Witness and The Wizard of Akyrz (all 1983),  Cutthroats, High Stakes, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, Mindwheel, Seastalker, Sorcerer and Zyll (all 1984), A Mind Forever Voyaging, Brimstone, Essex, Hampstead, Leather Goddesses of Phobos, A Mind Forever Voyaging, Spellbreaker and Wishbringer (all 1985), Breakers, Mindwheel and Terromolinos (all 1986), Philosopher's Quest (1987), Amnesia, Braminar, Dodgy Geezers, Jacaranda Jim, The Lurking Horror, Nord and Bert Couldn't Make Head or Tail of It, Sherlock: The Riddle of the Crown Jewels and Stationfall (all 1987), Dr. Dumont's Wild P.A.R.T.I. (1988), Arthur - The Quest for Excalibur, The Hound of Shadow, James Clavell's Shōgun and Journey (all 1989), Humbug (1990), Danger! Adventurer at Work! (1991), and Spy Snatcher (1992)

 

For many younger people today, the thought of life without a constant flow of text messaging is, if not unimaginable, incredibly stressful. Though it, like the text game, goes back to the mid-'60s, text messaging didn't really explode until the peak of BBS use in the late '80s/early '90s. In the early and mid-90s, I killed a lot of time (partly because it was dial-up) on ISCABBS and even made friends whom I'm still in contact with regularly today -- as unlikely as that sounds. My brother, meanwhile, was often using IRC to do the same.

 

Not coincidentally, as peer-to-peer communication through personal computers grew more common, conversely, text games became less so. Cell phones weren't really an issue at first, as they were still primarily used to make telephone calls. Although the first phones with SMS appeared in Finland in 1993, when I got my Motorola StarTac in 1997, it (like most cell phones) was bulky clamshells with external antennae and a simple diplay of phone number. Not to mention, they were so large that I carried mine in a pleather holster attached to my belt.



Nowadays cell phones are more like tricorders than conventional phones and there are many days (weeks?) where mine's phone function goes unused. As I walk the streets of Los Angeles, I routinely have to dodge hunchbacked textlemmings blindly stumbling around, no doubt in most cases merely making inconsequential small talk or sexting their friends. But what to do when your friends are busy, or their phone is dead, or your continued coordination of multiple Stove Top Stuffing meals has left you hungry for something new? Why not, just for lolz, run a terminal emulator and play a text game on your phone? You'll be glad you did. And check out the computer game section at Amoeba. We've been known to feature some pretty classic antiques at low, low prices. Though to play them may require tracking down a floppy disk drive, text games are doorways to whole 'nother worlds and therefore worth the effort.

One final note, should this whole "text-based games on cell phones" thing take off-- under no circumstances attempt to play them whilst driving. Just look what happens when a group of chavvers get wrapped up in a game of Eamon!


Beatles or Stones?... or Goth-Pop Beatles Covers!?

Posted by Aaron Detroit, September 5, 2009 12:50am | Post a Comment

Beatles Or Stones?” I’m one of those people who is definitely more Rolling Stones than Beatles. That’s not to say there aren’t Fab Four songs or albums I enjoy or even adore (White Album!), but The Stones suit my tastes and aesthetic preferences in music and art much more. The Stones have a classically debaucherous mythos attached to them and their vibe was always darker, nastier and convincingly Satanic compared to their Liverpool rivals.  True: The Beatles certainly had their more nefarious moments (“Helter Skelter,” “Happiness is a Warm Gun,” The Butcher Cover and Aleister Crowley's appeance on the Sgt, Peppers' album sleeve), but I’m definitely more “Paint It Black” than “Good Day Sunshine.”

However, some people still believe The Beatles held the keys to the infernal gates of Hell. Certainly several of my teenage Goth-Pop icons saw a dark thread in the Beatles' work (or maybe it was just their genius for unforgettable melodies – those do help bands cross-over!) Siouxsie Sioux’s devotion to the Fab Four turned out two great covers; first, an incendiary and punked-out “Helter Skelter” on the Banshees’ 1978 debut Scream:
...and the band scored one of their biggest International hits with their lush 1983 reading of “Dear Prudence.”


Banshees’ contemporary Daniel Ash (Bauhaus/Tones on Tail/Love & Rockets) displayed his shine for John, Paul, George and Ringo via a (now somewhat-dated) cover of “Day Tripper” on his 1991 solo album, Coming Down.


And the ultimate in Beatles gothic tribute/piss-taking is awarded to Slovenian Industrial-rock godfathers Laibach. In 1988 the group released a camp-yet-dry, near track-by-track cover album of The Beatles’ swansong Let It Be (strangely omitting the title-track). The band even scored a somewhat hit with their oddlly lovely rendition of “Across The Universe.”


The Beatles do ultimately get mega-points from me for saving their namesake and legacy from tarnish by disbanding before the 1970’s could force them into coked-out disco and before the 80’s could force them into ill-advised fluorescent suits and Aqua-net do’s, just like my preferred Stones.

With that said, I am genuinely excited about revisiting and reappraising The Beatles' Catalog when brand-spanking-new remastered editions (especially those limited Mono mixes!) are released on the ominous date of 9/9/09.

The Dutch Rock Conspiracy

Posted by Whitmore, September 4, 2009 11:15pm | Post a Comment

All those conspiracy theories about how we never actually went to the moon, how NASA along with the Defense Intelligence Agency staged everything on a huge soundstage in the Nevada desert and how the three astronauts were actually just in Las Vegas boozing it up and living large while undergoing ‘guilt therapy’ lessons to lie better and feel good about lying better and how this entire madcap moon adventure was a 30 billion dollar swindle to defraud the world and convince everyone, especially the Russians, that we kick ass, just may have gotten a bit of a boost.
 
A moon rock collected from the first manned lunar landing on July 20, 1969 and given to former Dutch Prime Minister Willem Drees as a private gift from then-U.S. ambassador J. William Middendorf, who accompanied the Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin, Jr. on a visit to The Netherlands has been analyzed and appears to be nothing more than petrified wood.
 
This treasured piece went on display at Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum Museum after Drees died in 1988; at one point the rock was insured for around $500,000. A new estimate suggests its value to closer to about $70.
 
Recent tests have proved that the moon rock is a fake; Geologists from Amsterdam's Free University said they could tell at a glance the rock was not from the moon. Needless to say NASA and U.S. officials have no explanation for the Dutch discovery.
 
Rijksmuseum Museum spokesperson Xandra van Gelder, said the museum will keep the artifact as a curiosity. “It's a good story, with some questions that are still unanswered,” she said. “We can laugh about it.”
 
Former U.S. ambassador Middendorf in an interview last week said he didn't recall presenting the rock to Drees, but does remember the astronauts visiting the Netherlands as part of their "Giant Leap" goodwill tour. Another odd unanswered question is why Drees would have been given the rock in the first place. In 1969 he would have been 83 years old and had been out of office for over a decade, though he was a national hero who helped rebuild the Netherlands after the Second World War.
 
My favorite lunar spin so far is that the plaque doesn’t actually claim the rock is from the moon, it just says it’s a gift from the astronauts who went to the moon ...

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 09:04:09

Posted by Billyjam, September 4, 2009 08:24am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five: 09:04:09
black eyed peas the end
1) Black Eyed Peas The E.N.D. (Interscope)

2) Slaughterhouse
self-titled (E1 Entertainment)

3) Mos Def
Ecstatic (Downtown)

4) Dudley Perkins
Holy Smokes (1 AM APPROACH)

5) Mr Capone-E
Diary of a G (Hi Power Entertainment / KOCH)

At the Amoeba Music Hollywood store this week many of the same best sellers from the past several weeks are still holding strong in the sales charts, with the Black Eyed Peas' latest The E.N.D. locking down the number one position. Meanwhile, up north in the San Francisco Amoeba Music store, Luis reports that among the new local Bay Area releases to arrive on Amoeba SF's shelves this week include Lyrics Born's Variety Show Vol 4 on Mobile Home Recordings, whose 22 tracks include guest spots from such fellow Quannum acts as Lateef the Truthspeaker,The Gift of Gab, and Joyo Velarde. Also just arriving into Amoeba SF this week is The Grouch/Instant Messengers affiliated hometown emcee Alexander Spit, whose new full-length CD Open Lyrics Born24 Hours is sponsored by the hip-hop clothing company The Hundreds.

This Week At The New Beverly: Sept 4 - 10

Posted by phil blankenship, September 4, 2009 12:44am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our September / October calendar is now online at
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday September 4 & 5

Tribute To John Hughes

Friday night special in person guests include actor Jeffrey Jones and actresses Edie McClurg & Cindy Pickett

Saturday night special in person guests include actors Jeffrey Jones & Lyman Ward, actresses Edie McClurg & Cindy Pickett, producer Tom Jacobson & editor Paul Hirsch


Ferris Bueller's Day Off
1986, USA, 103 minutes - Beautiful Archive Print
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0091042/
written & directed by John Hughes, starring Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck, Mia Sara, Jeffrey Jones, Jennifer Grey, Cindy Pickett, Lyman Ward, Edie McClurg, Ben Stein
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:30 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Etch A Sketch tribute to Michael Jackson

Posted by Whitmore, September 3, 2009 11:10pm | Post a Comment

It’s been awhile since I last wrote about George Vlosich III, one of the most unique artists working today. The medium he works in, more often than not is the Etch A Sketch. And yes, it's the same plastic, red-framed Etch A Sketch kids everywhere play with for a while before cracking it open to see how the hell it works.
 
Since ten years of age, Vlosich has been Etching. At eighteen he was commissioned by the Topps Trading Card Company to produce a series of Etch-A-Sketch drawings for their 1998 baseball card collection. Since then he has been commissioned to Etch many an athlete, musician and celebrity. 
 
I still can’t get my head around the technique or the amount of patience someone has to have to complete one drawing. And all of it is worked out to such perfection; unfathomable to an Etch A Sketch hack like myself. Most of Vlosich’s original work takes between 70-80 hours to create. Some, like George’s newest masterpiece, Michael Jackson, took 150 hours! That’s a full time job for a month! The details are insane. The images are spot on. And remember, an Etch A Sketch drawing must be done in one long line ... one continual unflinching, unforgiving friggin’ line! Legendary artist Paul Klee once described his own work as simply taking a line for a walk; yeah, but it ain’t nothing like George Vlosich’s trek. Once finished, the piece is then preserved to stand the test of time -- I hope! -- every drawing is unique and cannot be duplicated.  
 
George is hoping to use this Michael Jackson piece for charity, possibly blowing it up to extra large size and then having the performers at the September 26th Michael Jackson Tribute Concert in Vienna autograph it. The concert, which was announced a few days ago, will feature some of the world's top entertainers performing MJ's greatest hits on a crown-shaped stage being constructed outside the 17th-century Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna. The tribute will be broadcast live and is expected to draw an audience of one billion.
 

Sampling The Beatles In Hip-Hop Music

Posted by Billyjam, September 3, 2009 10:25am | Post a Comment

"The Grey Video" (Danger Mouse "Encore" Beatles meets Jay-Z)
 
Everyone loves The Beatles, including rappers and their producers, so it makes perfect sense that hooks, drum beats, high hats, stabs, guitar riffs, vocal soundbites, etc. etc. from the Fab Four's vast and varied Wu-Tang Clancatalog would provide an ample sampling source for hip-hop producers and remixers. RIght? Yes, but only if done legally-- provided that the owners of the copyrighted Beatles material were to give permission to the interested producer(s). And this is not something that happens easily. In fact, The Beatles' catalog is often referred to in hip-hop production circles as "the holy grail of samples," since it is so hard to get permission to sample the Liverpool lads' music for hip-hop songs. 

That's why it was such in 2007 when Wu-Tang Clan announced that they had secured the first fully legit sample of the Beatles' music. They reportedly got granted permission to sample the White Album's "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" for the Wu-Tang album 8 Diagrams. As it turned out, it Dhani Harrisonwasn't technically a Beatles sample clearance, but rather the go-ahead to replay the George Harrison penned Beatles tune with none other than George's own son Dhani Harrison (reportedly a major Wu-Tang Clan fan) playing the guitar bit on the track that also featured guest vocalist Erykah Badu.

Of course, The Beatles' music has been sampled many times in hip-hop (without permission) over the years, most famously on Danger Mouse's career-launching, incredibly popular (albeit totally illegal) 2004 release The Grey Album, where he liberally sampled the entire Beatles' White Album in a masterpiece mash-up that is beautifully blended with Jay-Z's The Black Album. The fact that it was an illegal recording didn't stop people from hearing it either. The album, which was sold as a bootleg, was traded and given Danger Mouse the grey albumaway in CD format and downloaded for free, thus making its way to countless iPods and music collections.

"Rain"/"Paperback Writer" Mystery Solved!

Posted by Miss Ess, September 2, 2009 11:29am | Post a Comment
Unlike some bloggers, I don't welcome or dream of dental surgery and/or visits to the dentist...

When I was a child, I was also particularly sensitive to teeth and their appearance. Chipping my teeth was up there as one of my worst fears for myself, and I'd often (for no real reason) vividly imagine the feeling of the moment of impact as my tooth hit something and broke (crazy, I know). It's still up there as far as things I'd like to avoid, to tell the truth...

Anyway, back then I was also an avid, constant viewer of the documentary The Compleat Beatles, in which clips of the videos for "Rain" and "Paperback Writer" are shown.




Seem like great videos, right? Cutting edge for 1966 too! But did you notice a little something amiss??

Imagine my trauma when watching these videos as a kid: My hero, Paul McCartney showed up missing a sizeable chunk of his front left tooth! It was awful. I had seen footage of him beyond the year 1966 and knew it had been fixed somewhere down the line, but I was gripped by curiosity and the need to know what had caused this most famous man to lose a good bit of his tooth in the heightened midst of his fame! It kept me up nights in my young life! I was about 8 years old (and the internet was a long ways off).

Much later in life, when I was in high school, my curiosity was at last satisfied when I read Beatles historian Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, literally a day by day account of what The Beatles were up to through their entire career...(I was a scholarly child, especially when it came to The Beatles). Finally, I could rest: I found out McCartney had been in a moped accident in which he broke his front tooth a few months before the videos were shot. The tooth was fixed soon after.

There, now you can all sleep at night.

THE BEATLES: ROCK BAND FURTHER BROADENS FAB FOUR'S FANBASE

Posted by Billyjam, September 2, 2009 11:00am | Post a Comment
Trailer for The Beatles: Rock Band (2009)

Everyone loves The Beatles and if there is still someone unmoved by the Fab Four, he or she soon will be once they get their hands on The Beatles: Rock Band video game, which is being released exactly a week from today on the easy to remember date of 9/9/09. That date also happens to be the same day that the much anticipated remastered Beatles catalog on CD The Beatles Rock Bandarrives in Amoeba Music. Not only will gamers of all ages take to this game, especially those who are already fans of Rock Band or Guitar Hero, but most likely people who have never played a video game in their lives will start now with The Beatles: Rock Band.

The game comes complete with 45 instantly recognizable Beatles songs, including "Get Back," "Day Tripper," "I Want To Hold Your Hand," and "Back in the USSR." The game's scenes and settings include playing in the Cavern Club and at Shea Stadium! This game will convert young kids to the music of the Beatles and older Beatles fans to the world of gaming; overall, even further broadening the fanbase of the Fab Four. 

The Beatles Part 4

Posted by Amoebite, September 2, 2009 10:41am | Post a Comment
We are kicking off the celebration in honor of the digitally remastered Beatles reissues set to hit Amoeba September 9! We present to you today the final segment of The Beatles' biography. Also, this week will be marked here on the blog with a number of Beatles related posts with a huge variety of topics! You can begin with Part One of the fabled band's history if you missed it by clicking right here; then check out Part Two right here; and finally, Part Three. Now, without further ado, Part Four:

beatles maharishi mahesh yogi

DISORDER, FINAL TRIUMPHS, AND DISSOLUTION
magical mystery tour
In the late summer of 1967, at the behest of George Harrison, The Beatles traveled to Bangor, Wales, for a retreat sponsored by the Spiritual Regeneration Movement, an organization founded by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, an India-born self-styled guru and teacher of the spiritual discipline of transcendental meditation. It was there, on Aug. 27, that the musicians received a phone call from London: Brian Epstein – who had grown increasingly uncertain about The Beatles’ future and unhappy in his closeted gay lifestyle -- had died, at the age of 32, from an accidental overdose of sleeping pills mixed with alcohol.

The Entity at the New Beverly Cinema Saturday at Midnight

Posted by phil blankenship, September 2, 2009 10:21am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!


Saturday September 5

Ron Silver &
Barbara Hershey in

The Entity


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7


September
September 12 Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo
If you can't beat the system...break it! 25th Anniversary!

September 19 TRUCKATHON
5 Film All Day Event! Admission is only $10 for the long haul

C.B. Hustlers (1978) 4:15
Hot Vans ... C.B. Radios ... And The "Hardest Working" Girls You'll Ever Meet!!!

Thunder Run (1986) 6:00
No way out. No way through. No way left but to GO FOR IT!

White Line Fever (1975) 8:00
Carrol Jo Hummer--A working man who's had enough!

Midriff Men

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 1, 2009 09:40pm | Post a Comment
No muffin tops, but the farmer's daughter knotted shirt look was obviously once the rage amongst musical studs. Plenty of late summer looks to be found here-- plan now, as we're bound to have another couple of nasty heatwaves before the fall cool down.









Sub Pop Sneaker Pimps: Seattle record label goes from grunge to sleek as it teams up with Nike to launch Sub Pop sneaker

Posted by Billyjam, September 1, 2009 10:26am | Post a Comment

Sub Pop Records, the legendary Seattle based record label first made famous back in the late eighties/early nineties for putting anti-fashion "grunge" acts on the music map, recently teamed up with Nike to launch the slick looking and pricey Sub Pop sneaker line: the Nike SB Blazer Elite Quickstrike -- Sub Pop Records. This high (street) fashion item is available on sites such as Sneaker.com, where the new Nike/Sub Pop collaborative design is described as "a new quickstrike SB. The shoe was made to go along with the Sub Pop Single Club 3.0’s first release “Gebel Barkal” b/w “(Version)” from the band OM. The record label is most known for first signing Nirvana, Soundgarden, Mudhoney and many other bands. This is a great shoe for any SB or record collector. This is 100% deadstock and considered pure heat!"  

The site Kicks On Fire describes the new line this way: "This pair of Quickstrikes sport a combination suede / leather construction in a green, yellow, and grey color scheme. Other features include white and black accents, as well as a star on the ankle."  And the cost for a pair of these puppies? Anywhere from $140 to $180 + tax depending on where you purchase them, except if you buy them directly from Sub Pop you can get them for the considerably lower price of $90 a pair. Buy the cheaper priced ones directly from the record label by clickng here.  But as the hard-working Sub-Popper Teal Garrels informs me they have less than 300 pairs to offer for sale and that they come in US men's sizes 6 through 13. Teal adds his description on the street fashion footwear as such, "The shoes have their own catalogue number (SP780) which is proudly displayed on the back of the heel. The Singles Club logo (including July 2009- Limited Edition) graces the inside of the tongue while the Sub Pop logo can be found on the front as well as on the insole of the high top sneaker."