Amoeblog

Cash Money Records - The Independent Years (1991-1998)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 31, 2009 11:25pm | Post a Comment

Check out our selection of Cash Money Records titles on Amoeba.com!

By now, anyone that reads this blog and is a fan of the many, great New Orleans labels that sprouted in the fertile hip-hop delta back in the '90s may've wondered why no Cash Money thusfar. Well, I've been working on it but the greatest of labels required a lot of work.
Hope you enjoy... wodie.

Back in the 1980s, the New Orleans Rap scene began to take root with early rappers like Tim Smooth, Warren Mayes, Ninja Crew and New York Incorporated all making noise. The latter act featured Mia X, Denny D, DJ Wop and Mannie Fresh and was probably the first rap group in the city. After their dissolution, Fresh hooked up with former Ninja Crew member Gregory D and they released a handful of influential, if not very widely promoted records.

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3 BAY AREA WEEKEND HAPPENINGS

Posted by Billyjam, July 31, 2009 06:05pm | Post a Comment

Amoeblog interview with SF Mime Troupe's Pat Moran

As per usual for summertime in the Bay Area, this weekend there will be lots of fun happenings to choose from-- many either for free or very affordably priced. These include the SF Mime Troupe's latest production Too BIg To Fail (Fri, Sat, Sun), Amoebapalooza (Sun), and the Lakefest (Sat, Sun).

A little earlier this afternoon (Friday July 31st), as the SF Mime Troupe was setting up for this evening's performance in Berkeley's Frances Willard/Ho Chi Minh Park (Derby & HIllegass), I conducted a brief but informative chat (video above) with musical director Pat Moran. The SF Mime Troupe is celebrating its 50th victorious year of putting on socially & politically charged plays for Bay Area summer audiences. This summer they are touring Bay Area parks with Too Big To Fail, which, in the form of a simple tale of an African villager, cleverly tackles the complex current global economic crisis.

Directed by Wilma Bonet, written by Michael Gene Sullivan, and with music by Pat Moran, this evening's entertainment kicks off at 6pm with music, and the play begins at 6:30pm. Tomorrow at 1:30pm/2pm at the same location and on Sunday afternoon (2pm/2:30pm) the Troupe will trek over to Mesa Park in Bolinas, in West Marin County. Admission to all all Bay Area park plays by the SF Mime Troupe is free but a donation (of any size) is requested for these always edutaining events. For more info on the remaining summer 2009 schedule visit the troupe's website.

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AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 07:31:09

Posted by Billyjam, July 31, 2009 03:08pm | Post a Comment
Psycho Realm's "Sick Dogs" from reissue of A War Story: Book 1

Amoeba Music Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five: 07:17:09
fabolous loso's way

1) Fabolous Loso's Way (Desert Storm/Def Jam)

2) Mos Def The Ecstatic (Downtown)

3) Dudley Perkins Holy Smokes (1 AM APPROACH)

4) Psycho Realm A War Story: Book 1 (Sick Symphonies)

5) Chali 2na Fish Outta Water (Decon)

Brooklyn, New York rapper Fabolous is back with a bang. His fifth and latest album, Loso's Way on Desert Storm/Def Jam, is this week's number one new hip-hop album at the Hollywood Amoeba Music store this week. Like Jay-Z [who, incidentally, appears here on the track "Money Goes, Honey Stay" (When the Money Goes Remix)] and his fabolous loso's wayAmerican Gangster record, the new Fab album also comes complete with a gangster movie inspired theme. Loso's Way is based on Carlito's Way. And the "Deluxe Edition" of Loso's Way comes complete with a DVD of the half-hour plus movie of the same name that is reportedly a semi-autobiographical film. The film also draws many parallels with the original movie character Al Pacino plays in Carlito's Way.

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You're Invited to Amoebapalooza North this Sunday, Aug 2!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 31, 2009 03:04pm | Post a Comment
amoebapalooza 2009

This Week At The New Beverly July 31- August 6

Posted by phil blankenship, July 31, 2009 10:29am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our August calendar is now online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm

August 5 - 13 Dante's Inferno!

Joe Dante returns to the New Beverly for a week-long screening series of classic films and special guests plus brand new prints of some of his own movies... PLUS an encore performance of the expanded version of his nearly six hour Movie Orgy!


July 31 & August 1


An Irene Dunne double bill!

Beautiful, rarely-screened 35mm archive prints

The Awful Truth (1937)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0028597/
dir. Leo McCarey, starring Irene Dunne, Cary Grant, Ralph Bellamy, Alexander D'Arcy, Cecil Cunningham
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:45 & 7:30

Academy Award Winner for Best Director, Leo McCarey
Nominated for 5 other Oscars including Best Actress

Asteroids in animation, games, movies & television

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 30, 2009 04:26pm | Post a Comment
Asteroids have capitivated the imagination ever since rocks first looked into the heavens and asked, "Are we alone?" The entertainment industry has shown asteroid fields to be a place to hone your space navigation skills and target shooting and rogue asteroids as hell-bent on destroying humankind. As far as threats go, to me the gigantic, silent, soulless killing machines arouse a similar fear to that inspired by sharks. And now, as announced in the Hollywood Reporter earlier this month, Universal has acquired the rights to the classic Atari game and plans on adapting it into film. Matt Lopez (Race to Witch Mountain and Bedtime Stories) pitched the idea and found himself at the center of a bidding war between four studios. From Wing Commander and Double Dragon to House of the Dead and Hitman, films adapted from video games are generally quite good.


Although the chart above shows the existence of many real life asteroids, the entertainment industry almost always portrays fictional or just un-named space rocks.
 
ASTEROIDS IN COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES

     
Final Fantasy IV   

The aformentioned Asteroids is the best known example of a game focusing on asteroids. Descent, The Dig, Final Fantasy IV, Homeworld, Millenium 2.2 and The Orion Conspiracy all feature un-named or fictional asteroids to various degrees.

ASTEROIDS IN ANIMATION

   

Danny Phantom's "Phantom Planet,Futurama's "Love & Rocket," and the anime Metal Armor Dragonar (Kikō Senki Doragunā) have all got some asteroids in 'em too.

ASTEROIDS ON TELEVISION


           

In "The Wandering Asteroid" espisode of Space Patrol, the crew must destroy an asteroid on a collision course. On Star Trek's "For the World is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky," a group of aliens live on a spacecraft disguised as an asteroid. On Buck Rogers's “The Golden Man,” in the name of accuracy one of the crew at least points out the dense field is the densest he's seen. Red Dwarf features several references to asteroid mines, which are also mentioned on Battlestar Galactica's “Scar.” Although often described as a documentary, the BBC's depiction of a near catastrophe by the Pegasus spacecraft in Space Odyssey - Voyage To The Planets never actually happened. Stargate SG-1’s “Failsafe” features the common "Asteroid on a collision course" theme.  
 
ASTEROIDS IN MOVIES


             

In 2001 - A Space Odyssey, realistic asteroids are seen as Discovery One approaches Jupiter. The Green Slime, also from 1968, was slightly more fanciful. Star Wars - The Empire Strikes Back followed Atari's depiction of asteroids as densely flying in all directions, randomly exploding and providing navigational challenges for space pilots. In Revenge of the Sith, Luke and Leia are born on an asteroid colony. In 1979, Ronald Neame had a go at the fadingly popular disaster genre with Meteor, which was about an asteroid, despite the title. Though nearly universally reviled, it was practically remade by the campily enjoyable Deep Impact and the truly inept, J.J. Abrams-penned Armageddon. A year earlier, Starship Troopers had featured aliens wiping out Buenos Aires with an asteroid weapon.


REAL ASTEROIDS IN FICTION

Although un-named, un-specified or otherwise imagined asteroids appear far more often on the screen than their real counterparts, the real-deal-asteroid-fields have nonetheless made appearances here and there.

Ceres, a dwarf planet located within the asteroid belt, is the subject of a separate blog.

 

Pallas was the second asteroid to be discovered, in 1802, by a German. It's named after Pallas Athena. One of the largest asteroids in the belt, it may contain 7% of its total mass. In “The Shrinking Spaceman” episode of Space Patrol (1962), there is a sonar beam transmitter located there.

asteroid 1997

Eros
was discovered in 1898 and was the first Near Earth Asteroid discovered. It's believed to be even more massive than the impactor that created the Chicxulub Crater in the Yucatán that wiped out the dinosaurs and led to the evolution of the Voth (as seen on Star Trek - Voyager). Eros was featured in the 1997 TV movie Asteroid.

   

Juno is named after Juno, "the one unique," the wife of Jupiter. It was originally considered a planet but is too small, although it may contain 1% of the entire mass of the asteroid belt. In Mobile Suit Gundam, it's relocated to Earth's orbit and renamed Luna².
 

Hygiea is named after the goddess of cleanliness, health and sanitation in the Greek religion. It's the fourth largest object in the asteroid belt and was discovered in 1849 by an Italian. It has thus far provided the setting of no known films, games, TV shows, &c. Hopefully it'll show up in Asteroids.

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Come on Down to the Party!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 30, 2009 02:40pm | Post a Comment



Amoeba Music Co-Hosts & Sponsors the East Bay Express Best of the East Bay Party!
@
The Oakland Museum of California
Friday, August 7th.
5pm-Midnight
Free & Open to All Ages!

Oakland Faders See 20 bands on six stages, including the Amoeba-sponsored Main Stage (with late-night Mistress of Ceremonies Odessa Lil and DJ stage hosted by the Oakland Faders.)

From R&B to Metal, Rock out with great East Bay Sounds From:
Goapele, Social Unrest, Dizzy Balloon, Souls of Mischief.

July 29, 2009 part 2

Posted by phil blankenship, July 30, 2009 12:17am | Post a Comment

SHOUT!

Posted by Whitmore, July 29, 2009 09:59pm | Post a Comment

50 years ago today, one of the most ass kicking songs ever laid down on wax, the classic, seminal “Shout” was recorded by the Isley Brothers for RCA Records. Written by the brothers themselves, the lead vocals were handled by Ronald Isley with brothers O’Kelly and Rudolph singing back up. Even though the song never reached any higher than #47 on the Billboard Hot 100 and never did much on the R&B charts, “Shout” eventually became their first gold single simply on the basis of its lingering popularity. In 1999 “Shout” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
 
The Isleys originally sang gospel, but by 1957 they had switched to doo-wop, left Cincinnati, and moved to New York City where they first recorded for Teenage Records. In 1959, RCA signed the group after catching them as an opening act for R&B legend Jackie Wilson.
 
“Shout” was their second release for the RCA; their first, “I’m Gonna Knock on Your Door” failed to chart. Initially “Shout” didn’t make much of a dent on the national stage, but after being covered by other artists, like a 15 year old Lulu, and the king of the Peppermint Twist -- Joey Dee and the Starlighters -- the song found an audience. RCA re-released the Isley’s original version in 1961 but once again the single didn’t catch on, peaking at #92. With that failure, the Isleys were released from their RCA contract. No problem, they would chart dozens of singles for the next 5 decades for labels like Wand, Tamla, T-Neck and Warner Brothers.
 
As for “Shout,” it has been recorded by a wide range of artists like Johnny O'Keefe (his version reached #3 on Australian charts in November 1959), The Shangri-Las, The Beatles, Question Mark and the Mysterians, Alvin and the Chipmunks (Simon sang lead), Tom Petty, Billy Joel, Joan Jett, and the Temptations used to do it live, as did The Who, Panic At The Disco and Green Day. Of course, the most famous version is by Otis Day and the Knights from the 1978 movie Animal House.

July 29, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, July 29, 2009 05:35pm | Post a Comment



GROUND CONTROL TO MAJOR iPHONE:

Posted by Billyjam, July 29, 2009 08:09am | Post a Comment


In July 1969 David Bowie released "Space Oddity" (see original video below) and now, forty years later, anyone can remix the song on their iPhone or iPod Touch with the Remix David Bowie Space Oddity Application powered by iKlax which was very recently made available for purchase. This marketing launch, of course, strategically ties in with the 40th anniversary of Man's first steps on the moon. According to the marketers,"'Space Oddity' has become cult material, marking David Bowie's career forever. Moreover, the track was broadcasted along with the live images from the moon landing by the BBC as Apollo 11 and Neil Armstrong made history. By choosing the iKlax multitrack iPhone application for "Space Oddity"'s own 40th anniversary, David Bowie provides a unique experience to his fans.

The remix application contains the original soundtracks for each and every instrument used in the song, letting users vary the volumes of the voice, the 12 string guitar, drum & bass, mellotron, organ, violin and orchestra, as well as save each new remix. Oh yeah, and it also has a fun feature whereby you can shake the iPhone to get new sounds, as shown above.

IT'S THE REAL THING: COCA COLA COMMERCIAL MUSIC

Posted by Billyjam, July 29, 2009 06:29am | Post a Comment


coca colaArtists' music being used in commercials was once a touchy subject. And it is still is, but to a lesser degree nowadays than in bygone decades, it seems. It also depends on what context the music is used and what exact song by which artist is being utilized. Some commercially popular music is just geared to be a jingle. But traditionally the typical "serious" artist felt lending their art in exchange for cash as the soundtrack to some shallow TV commercial geared to sell (the word "pimp" would often be used) cars or washing detergent was the ultimate sellling of your soul to "the man."

And of course, if said artist's music is reactionary, revolutionary, anti-authoritarian, protest type music, it really is contradictory to have it included in a cheesy TV ad -- hence the reason Jello Biafra fought so hard against his litigating former friends/bandmates who he insisted were trying hard to make a quick buck by selling the rights of the Dead Kennedys' song "Holiday In Cambodia" to be used in a Levi's commercial.

But even less politically overt artists than Biafra are against their music being used in commericals. Still, there are exceptions to every rule. A good example is Jack White, who has long been opposed to the White Stripes' music being sold for use in a commercial. Reportedly over the years he and his bandmate white stripeshave been approached many times and turned down the offers to use the Stripes' music in commercials. But he wasn't opposed to composing a whole new song for a TV commercial a few years ago; he penned the sixties Brit psychedelic inflected tune called "Love Is The Truth" (reminiscent of the Small Faces' hit "Itchycoo Park") with the repeated lyrics "Love is the truth/ It's the right thing to do," to be used in a Coca Cola ad.

Instructional Records

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 28, 2009 11:59pm | Post a Comment

The world of the instructional record is really quite fascinating. From sincere DIY teachings to crass bandwagoning & fad jumping, the instructional record was a force unto itself in the 60's & 70's. The endless barrage of salesman related "you can do it" LPs from that era rival the male enhancement ad fads of today and reveal a similar, sinister undercurrent of predatory schemes that feed on the insecurity of many a male ego. It's entertainment all the way around! You'd be hard pressed to find more timely LPs than Strategy At the Bridge Table or either of the dance related records below.



I always find it funny that the three most important classes I took in High School were one semester electives-- guitar, speech and typing. Guitar was the beginning of the dymistification process between music and I. It also gave me much needed entertainment as I watched the jock meatheads fumble through "Lovesong" by the Cure in preparation for a lame attempt at buttering up some ditz over at the girls school. Speech was SO important, as it gave me an opportunity to get over performance anxiety by forcing me to give contrarian speeches to the same hamfisted types I mentioned in the guitar bit, within the safety net of the classroom. The teacher always wore suits and had a small mustache, traits that may have settled into my subconcious. He was asked to leave by the end of the semester because his affair with a jr. over at the girls school had been discovered, a trait I don't think I've picked up. The third class prepared me for the internet age. Not that I 'm a great typist, but whenever I watch a two fingered wonder pecking away, I'm always glad I took the class. Anyhow, this rant was brought on by the plethora of typing related LPs that I've seen over the years, a few of which are featured below.  




Looking North to the Future. It’ll be good.

Posted by Whitmore, July 28, 2009 10:30am | Post a Comment

I have a recollection, probably faulty, of some TV character, dressed as a beatnik, on a mid seventies sitcom reciting a beat poem. And the poem went something like, “little puppy with your nose pressed up against the pet store window, there is no puppy food for you today ... only death.” I found it hysterical.
 
As some people know, I’m a modern poetry fan, and I’m even a bigger fan of beat poetry, even with all its occasionally preposterous immoderations. But what I really live for is faux beat poetry. Years ago an old friend of mine read a pumpkin pie recipe as a beat poem; it was the most illuminating piece of prose I have ever heard ... until now. Here is Sarah Palin’s farewell speech read by the ultimate hepcat, William Shatner.

Li'l Bit #9

Posted by Job O Brother, July 28, 2009 09:56am | Post a Comment
Hoo, boy. Who didn't see this coming?

Happy Birthday Marcel Duchamp

Posted by Whitmore, July 28, 2009 09:25am | Post a Comment

Composed by John Cage in 1947 for prepared piano, Music For Marcel Duchamp was originally created for Duchamp’s segment in Hans Richter's surrealist film Dreams that money can buy. Other collaborators in Richter's movie included Max Ernst, Man Ray, Alexander Calder, Darius Milhaud and Fernand Léger. The film, with a budget of $25,000, won the Award for the Best Original Contribution to the Progress of Cinematography at the 1947 Venice Film Festival. Duchamps' segment is entitled "Discs" and consists mostly of his rotoreliefs; flat cardboard circles with painted designs spinning on a turntable. Later, in 1999, Music For Marcel Duchamp was choreographed by the late, great Merce Cunningham.
 
The composition evokes timbres and harmonies of Asian music, as well as the music of Erik Satie: static, meditative and timeless. Using just a few tones, muted by weather stripping (seven pieces), and a piece of rubber and one metal bolt, the soft materials create a less metallic sound and avoid disruptive fluctuations in resonance. The rhythmic structure is eleven times eleven (extended); 2-1-1-3-1-2-1. One of the new ideas Cage worked on in this piece was the concept of silence used systematically. This can be heard, or not heard, in the last part of the work, where seven times 2 bars of music are followed by 2 bars of silence. This repetition creates tension as the work mostly builds on a single melodic line.
 
Joyeux Anniversaire Monsieur Duchamp!

Metal Monday Amoeblog: The Iron Maidens Interview

Posted by Billyjam, July 27, 2009 08:52pm | Post a Comment
Iron Maidens

Los Angeles, CA hard rock band The Iron Maidens are, as they fairly claim, "the world's only female tribute band to Iron Maiden." But they are also most proficient and accomplished musicians, who not only do justice to their heavy metal heroes, but also add a new lease on life to the veteran UK metal band whose music they've been avidly honoring since they formed eight years ago.

They've even recently recorded and released a kick-ass CD/DVD set of Iron Maiden songs. titled Route 666 (a nod to Flight 666). The original Iron Maiden-esque cover art of a female monster is done by iron maidensDerek Riggs, creator of Iron Maiden’s mascot, Eddie, and numerous signature Iron Maiden album covers familiar to any Maiden fan.

The five member group, comprised of women with diversified musical backgrounds ranging from orchestral and musical theater to blues and rock, is comprised of Linda “Nikki McBURRain” McDonald on drums, Sara “MiniMurray” Marsh and Courtney “Adriana Smith” Cox on guitars, Kirsten “Bruce Chickinson” Rosenberg on vocals, and Wanda "Steph Harris" Ortiz on bass.

Hard rocking and hard working, the band's busy upcoming schedule includes playing an all ages show at the Trevi Entertainment Center in Lake Elsinore, CA tomorrow, Second Wind in Santee, CA on Thursday,  The Key Club in Hollywood on August 12th, the The VooDoo Lounge in San Jose on August 14th, and Annie's Social Club on Folsom in SF on August 15th. Fresh back from a Saturday night gig in Kansas, I caught up with the band yesterday to talk about, among other things, Iron Maiden's music, the difference between a tribute and a cover band, and being women in a male dominated field. The interview, which the band members collectively answered in true democratic fashion as a unit, follows below the video clip of the band performing "Revelations" at Cane's in San Diego last month. For more info on the Iron Maidens visit their official website or their MySpace.
 


Amoeblog: Whose idea was it to form the Iron Maidens and how did it initially all come about?
Iron Maidens: It was a mutual love of Iron Maiden. We knew each other from here and there and with down time from other bands we were in, we got together just to have fun and jam some Maiden songs. From the start the response was phenomenal, with guys fighting to look in the rehearsal door window to see who was playing these great songs. Then we thought, 'Hey, let's do 1 show for a goof and see how it iron maidensgoes.' It sold out and we haven't looked back since.

National Salad Week & the Brown Derby's Culinary Input

Posted by Whitmore, July 27, 2009 08:23pm | Post a Comment

July 25 to 31 is National Salad Week. And don’t forget the salad dressing. According to a recent consumer survey conducted by Synovate, 95 percent of Americans consume salads, or at least lettuce, at least three times per week. Not only do most Americans eat salads regularly, but they perceive other salad eaters as healthier, happier and, according to the Atlanta-based Association for Dressings and Sauces (ADS, a national trade association representing the manufacturers of salad dressings and condiment sauces), salad lovers are thought to be sexier. In other words, if you want to impress, eat a salad, though you might want to avoid the onions...
 
One of the most popular salad concoctions was invented here in Los Angeles, just around the corner from Amoeba, in glamorous old Hollywood at 1628 North Vine Street; the former location of the Hollywood Brown Derby. That delicious meal in a bowl would be none other then the Cobb Salad.
 
But first: The Brown Derby was a chain of four restaurants in Los Angeles. The first and the most iconic of these was located at 3427 Wilshire Boulevard. Shaped like a man's derby hat, its diameter was 28 ft and it stood was just under 18 feet tall. The restaurant was started by Bob Cobb, eventual owner of the Hollywood Stars baseball team of the Pacific Coast League and Herbert Somborn, the former husband of the screen siren Gloria Swanson. Opened in 1926, the building was moved to 3347 Wilshire Boulevard in 1937 and after being sold and renovated in 1975, it was quickly euthanized in 1980 by a strip mall known as the Brown Derby Plaza. The doomed domed structure was incorporated into the third floor of the building where there is supposed to be a cafe, but to be perfectly honest, its dignity and splendor is long gone.
 
Designed to catch the eye of passing motorists, the architectural inspiration, according to one story, was the hat worn by New York governor and the perennial Democratic presidential candidate Al Smith, who was a good friend of Somborn’s. Another version has Somborn playing with the idea that a great restauranteur could serve food anywhere, even out of a hat, and still be successful.
 
The second Brown Derby opened on Vine Street on Valentine's Day in 1929. Close to the studios like Paramount and RKO, it was here that the Derby legend was made; the Hollywood elite would wine and dine, wheel and deal, meet to compete. It didn’t hurt that legendary gossip columnists Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper plied their trade and rivalries at the Vine Street location, setting up shop to play their wicked little games. Unfortunately most of the building was destroyed by a fire in 1987. A small portion of the restaurant's original facade remains and is being incorporated into the new W Hotel and Condo development, project completion is set for the fall of this year.
 
The third Brown Derby was built in 1931 near Rodeo drive at 9537 Wilshire Blvd in Beverly Hills; it resembled the Hollywood branch in its Spanish Mission style. It was closed down and demolished in 1983. The fourth location at 4500 Los Feliz Blvd is the last remaining original Derby standing. Cecil B. De Mille, legendary director and producer and a part owner of the Wilshire Blvd restaurant, bought at auction a restaurant named Willard's, converting it into a Brown Derby in 1940. Willard's was a country inn serving "Far Famed Chicken Steak Dinners," and its dome shaped roof design actually had a function. Water was pumped to the top of the dome and then run down the sides into a trough, creating one of the first "air conditioned" buildings in Los Angeles. Willard's also kept live poultry in cages on the grounds; they had the slogan: "chickens whose feet never touch the ground.” Sounds yummy ... and humane! The Los Feliz Brown Derby became one of the first restaurants to combine both high class upscale food and a 24 hour drive-in, perfect for the burgeoning So-Cal car culture. The restaurant closed its doors in 1960 and became Michaels of Los Feliz. In 1992 the building was transformed once again, this time into a nightclub, The Derby, and a restaurant; Louisa’s Trattoria. But in 2004, the Los Feliz property was purchased by Hillhurst/Los Feliz LLC with an idea to raze the structure and build a condominium/retail complex. An independent coalition called "Save the Derby" fought to prevent its demolition, and on May 19, 2006, the Los Angeles City Counsel voted unanimously to designate the structure as an official Historic Cultural Monument.
 
But I digress, back to the whole point of today’s blog: Salad Week.
 
According to Hollywood myth it was a dark and stormy night ... actually, it was in 1936 or ’37, owner Bob Cobb hastily concocted a midnight snack for the famished and very powerful theatre owner Sid Grauman, owner of Grauman’s Chinese Theater. Cobb grabbed a few leftovers and whatever he could find in the refrigerator; a head of lettuce, avocado, tomato, some cold chicken, a hard-boiled egg or two, a little bacon, and Roquefort cheese -- different versions of the story list different ingredients. He chopped everything into a fine dice, fancied it up a bit with some leafy lettuce, laying out each ingredient on top in a clean, straight row, added some French dressing. Viola! The next time Sid Grauman came in he asked for the salad; the Cobb salad was born and soon became the signature menu item. Bob Cobb may have passed away in 1970, but his name lives on in restaurants across the land.
 
But as I dug deeper, trying to separate fact from fiction, another version of the story emerged. This account claims the salad came about because Bob Cobb had had dental surgery and since the pain wouldn’t allow him to open his mouth very wide, his chef fixed him a salad, dicing each item into small bits. Sounds plausible, but personally I like the Sid Grauman story better. It’s more Hollywood-like; I see an unlikely hero and an unlikely, yet inevitable, happy ending. As the writer James Warner Bellah asserts in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, ''When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.''
 
Anyway, I’m heading out to dinner ... though I’m more in the mood for pizza.

Cold Cave: Love Comes Close to Perfection

Posted by Aaron Detroit, July 27, 2009 06:30pm | Post a Comment

Wesley Eisold
has garnered cult status among many young malcontents for his work in hardcore/noise-punk groups like Give Up The Ghost and Some Girls. So to some it came as bit of a shock when Eisold unveiled his latest project: Cold Cave, a synth-heavy Pop-Industrial group also featuring the likes of Caralee McElroy of Indie-Pop-Noise Experimentalists Xiu Xiu and Noise/Power Electronics Guru Dominick Fernow, aka Prurient.

Early Cold Cave recordings (collected on the CD compilation Creamations, released earlier this year) feature Eisold, mostly solo, building the skeleton for the group. Those tracks lean more towards the noisy and atonal side of things. However, on two now-out-of-print 12" vinyl singles released in late 2008
(The Trees Grew Emotions and Died ) and May 2009 (Etsel & Ruby) the project slowly began to lift its more oppressive atmospheres and mine and expand its dark retro/futurist pop-scope as more members fell into its ranks.

This month saw the release of the group's first full-length album, Love Comes Close, a near-flawless slab of 9 inspired dark-wave and synth-pop anthems. Eisold and Co. wear their influences unashamedly on their sleeves, from the heavily Joy Divison/New Order-esque title track
(featuring former Hatebreed axeman Sean Martin on guitar) and the all-around highlight "Youth & Lust" with its Technique-era pulse and fever-dream litany to the immense Gary Numan-throb of "Heaven Was Full." There are also nods to early OMD, Psychic TV, and Chris & Cosey.  Beyond the more obvious '80's pop, post-punk and noise influences, Cold Cave also looks to early electronic music for inspiration -- and maybe not where you'd expect -- "The Laurels of Erotomania" sounds like the sinister mope-pop step-child of Hot Butter's version of Gershon Kingsley's "Popcorn." However, none of its love for bygone eras distracts or takes away from the group's own creative merits. The album somehow moves the synth-pop genre forward with its shambolic, distorted, scourged and unpolished (qualities not usually associated with synth-pop) atmosphere, while still remaining lovingly evocative of its predecessors. Much of Cold Cave's special and singular flare also has to do with Eisold's intense, love-lorn and world-weary lyrics (sung jointly by McElroy and Eisold) which chime simple but rich profundities:

"Love comes close/But chooses to spare me/ Death comes close, but ceases to take me." 
 

This also sets Cold Cave far apart from a whole host of lesser bands trying to mine similar territory.

(Bonus Trivia: Eisold settled out of court with pop stars Fallout Boy when they admittedly plagiarized Give Up The Ghost lyrics.)

Love Comes Close is easily one of 2009's best and most vital collection of songs in the genre and beyond, and will likely set the standard for many to measure against.

Amoeba Hollywood has VERY LIMITED copies of Love Comes Close on LP in this week. The CD Digipak version will be available from the store the first week of August. Hurry in for the LP, they're going quickly!

Also, don't forget to pick up a copy Jessie Evans' amazing, year-end-list-worthy, debut solo LP/CD, Is It Fire? at Amoeba Hollywood!

Video: Cold Cave play "The Laurels of Erotomania" at No Fun Fest '09



Amoeba Hollywood’s Goth/Industrial Section Featured New Releases:

Nachtmahr - Alle Lust Will Ewigkeit CD [Trisol]
L'ame Immortelle mastermind Thomas Rainer's industrial project's new album.

We.Got.this.Far - Bluntforcevolume CD [Spiral Chords]
California Industrial Rock, debut album.

Dope Stars Inc.
- 21st Century Slave CD [Metropolis]
Italian Industial, features the club hits
“Criminal Intents” and “Morning Star.”


In Next Week, Amoeba Hollywood:

6 Comm - Like Stukas Angels Fall: Retrospect 1984 -1990 CD [Kenaz]
Re-recorded album of classic tracks featuring songs from the early 6comm period and also a few tracks from his previous work in Death in June. Electro - Folk - Classical- Martial- Experimental -- 16 great songs, including new versions of "Torture Garden" and "Carousel" with new vocal sections. Nice gold foil blocked Digipak!

Black Sun Productions - Somwhere Between Desire & Despair CD [Torurette]
Awesome full-length new collaboration between
Black Sun Productions and Val Denham! Recorded live at the Transformer Festival, Biel, Switzerland, March 31, 2007!


Still Fresh...

Frozen Plasma - Momentum CD [Metropolis]

Tor Lundvall
- Sleeping and Hiding Limited vinyl LP [Dais]
Dais is flawless! Not a bad release in the bunch! Dreamy bliss in the vein of Talk Talk’s later stuff and Slowdive’s Pygmalion.

Death In June - Braun Buch Zwei CD [Neroz]
(Digitally remastered edition was the bonus CD accompanying the 20th Anniversary Stone Circle Edition of DIJ’s seminal Brown Book album issued in 2007, and contains 7 songs from the original album coupled with 7 remixed, re-recorded and rare versions of the remaining songs. Basically, it’s Brown Book II. The completely recycled paper booklet and 'Repak' is brown with black 'Ultra Coated' images and runes featuring never-before-seen photos from the period.)

Njurmannen - Terror in The Dollhouse [Old Europa Cafe]

Naevus - Truffles of Love (Remastered Reissue) [Old Europa Cafe]

Rome - Flowers from Exile CD [Trisol]
Great New Full-Length at DOMESTIC price!

Les Paradisiers - More Tales From The Garden LIMITED vinyl LP + MP3 card [Disques De Lapin]
Awesome full-length new collaboration between Thomas Nola and O Paradis! Swinging dark cabaret!


 

out this week 7/14 & 7/21...dead weather...blue roses...fiery furnaces...the state on dvd!...

Posted by Brad Schelden, July 27, 2009 04:40pm | Post a Comment


My personal goal for about a year now has been to watch all the Harry Potter movies. I had resisted for a while and since I missed the first couple in the theater, I felt like I could never catch up in time. But when the Half-Blood Prince got delayed, I figured I finally had a chance to watch the first 5 so I could see the sixth one in the theater. Of course, the months went by and all of a sudden it was July and I only had a couple of weeks to watch them all -- still, I knew I could do it. I was not sure if I was going to become obsessed with the movies like everyone else had, but I figured I would at least enjoy them. I did probably have time to read all the books as well, but I have been reading about 5 books the last couple of months all at the same time, so I didn't think I could both read the books and see the movies. I also thought I might enjoy the movies more without reading the books. It has been very rare to actually end up liking a movie version of one of my favorite books. I get really attached to the characters in the book and how I feel they should be portrayed. And turning a long book into a 2 hour movie is always hard. You always have to cut stuff out, it is just impossible not to. So I ended up having the benefit of going into the films not really knowing much about them or having any interest in how the books or characters were portrayed. I knew Harry Potter was some sort of magical British wizard that went to some boarding school type school for young wizards. Other than that I really didn't know what to expect. I sort of have a weird dislike for British children in movies, and I wasn't really excited to see them flying around with capes and wands, which is part of the reason I had stayed away from the series...But I couldn't resist any longer. It was too big a piece of pop culture for me to miss out on. 

So I finally sat down and watched all 5 movies in about 7 days and ended the run by seeing the sixth movie in the theater last week. I watched them with a big fan of the books and the movies and I tried to find out what happened in the movies before it actually happened but he wouldn't tell me and left me in suspense. It was nice to have someone there to fill in the blanks when I tried to figure out what had just happened after the movies ended. The last couple of movies were my favorites. I like when they started to get darker and I loved the introduction of Helena Bonham Carter's character, Bellatrix. Almost every British actor seems to pop up in one of the movies, and there are a lot of my favorites. I love Gary Oldman, who plays Sirius Black, and Emma Thompson, who plays Sybil Trelawney.  Miranda Richardson is also brilliant as always, as Rita Skeeter. And of course, Maggie Smith is perfect as Minerva McGonagall. The best thing about these movies is really the cast. It really is a perfect cast in all the movies. Two of my favorites of the younger cast are Evanna Lynch, who plays Luna Lovegood, and Shirley Henderson, who plays Moaning Myrtle. I wouldn't say that I am now an obsessive Harry Potter fan, but I am for sure a fan. The movies are really fun for people of all ages. I wouldn't mind going back and reading all the books at some point. I have heard they are really fun to read. Maybe my goal can be to read all the books before the last 2 movies come out in 2010 and 2011. I think I can find the time.

My other current obsession has been Grace Jones. I have been obsessed with her most of my life. How can you not be? But as I was getting ready for her show, which was last night, I had been thinking about her more and more. I talked about the album on my blog when it first came out back in Novemeber of last year. You can read my review of it here and even buy the album from the link. I figured the album would be out domestically by now, but it's not! It really is so good that I can't recommend it enough. It should be out domestically at some point before the end of the year. Grace did make a comment about it at the show. She said something like "I know the album is hard to find out here, but you are finding it and it will be out domestically soon." At least there is some sort of plan. Grace Jones has not played a show out here in probably close to 20 years. I am not sure when she toured out here last exactly, but I know for sure that I have never had a chance to see her. I knew that this would be a once in a lifetime opportunity and I knew that I had to go. The Hollywood Bowl is one of my favorite places to see a show, so it was the perfect place for Grace. The Greek would have been even better, just because it is smaller and more intimate, but Grace Jones is just too big for the Greek. So, the show was last night! They unfortunately had 3 performers, so I knew Grace would not be able to do the long set that her fans needed and deserved due the early curfew. She played a little under an hour and 1/2. The show was near perfect but it could have been a bit longer. It was everything that I hoped it would be. It is hard to describe if you were not there, but as one super fan in front of me yelled out, "She is killing it." She is still as brilliant and relevant as ever and literally had the crowd in awe of her brilliance the whole show.
 
I think everyone in the audience had their own idea of how the show would open. I imagined her flyingdown to the stage or appearing from below the stage in a ball of fire. I just knew it would somehow be different and amazing. She performed the entire first song beneath some sort of sheet, which made us all crazy with anticipation about what she was going to be wearing...assuming she was actually under there. I thought for a second that somebody else was under there and she still might somehow descend from the sky. But she came out from beneath the sheet for the second song and the crowd went nuts and clapped for what seemed like 5 minutes. She looked fantastic, wearing an outfit that really only she could get away with. She had about 5 costumes changes throughout the show, each more amazing than the last. My favorite part of the night was probably the in between song conversations she had with us in the audience. She never stopped entertaining, even when she was changing her outfits. She sometimes even went backstage to change before the song was even over. But she kept singing and then continued to tell us stories or tell jokes in the way that is uniquely Grace Jones. I loved every minute of it. She as a lot of songs to choose from. I really wanted to hear "Pull Up To the Bumper," and lucky for me, this was her last song. It was a beautiful night and the Bowl was a fantastic place to see her. I can't really imagine the show being much better. She could have easily used back up dancers on stage with her, but then again, she really didn't need them. All we needed was Grace Jones being Grace Jones. The back up singers and band were actually all placed below and behind the stage. You could still see them but the focus of the show was obviously her. I just hope she comes back to Los Angeles at some point. We could all use some more Grace Jones in our life. She is playing one more show out in New York in a couple of days. I checked this morning and there were still tickets left! The show is on Thursday, 7/30, at Hammerstein Ballroom. I highly suggest you go if you have the chance. I know this show will remain one of my favorites of all time. It was that good and that memorable. My obsession and love for Grace Jones is now even stronger. I hope we hear from her soon or that she pops up in some TV special or another movie. Maybe they will put her in the next Harry Potter Movie! She would be a fantastic villain!

Here is her amazing but too short set list for the Hollywood Bowl show...

1. This Is Life
2. Williams Blood
3. My Jamaican Guy
4. La Vie En Rose
5. Love is the Drug
6. Corporate Cannibal
7. Devil in My Life
8. Demolition Man
9. Libertango
10. Hurricane

encore
11. Pull Up to the Bumper

also out 7/14...









The State: The Complete Series on DVD!!!















Horehound by Dead Weather











Lemons by Ty Segall











And the Ever Expanding Universe by Most Serene Republic






also out 7/21...






Blue Roses by Blue Roses











Totems Flare by Clark











I'm Going Away by The Fiery Furnaces











Riceboy Sleeps Tonight by Jonsi & Alex











Josephine by Magnolia Electric Co.











Gorgeous Johnny by Sykgreen Leopards




 

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 07/31/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 27, 2009 03:46pm | Post a Comment
New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

bop clear your mind
Bop 
CLEAR YOUR MIND D12"
MEDIC15

This includes 5 of the most hypnotizing, enchanting songs from the full length CD of the same name. Icey, minimal IDM with a certain glitched out beauty, the tracks included are "ATARAXIA," "CLEAR YOUR MIND," "ROVOR," "NOTHING MAKES ANY SENSE," and "CHAOSMOS."
flying lotus
Flying Lotus
SHHH REMIX EP 12"
FLY001  

Ultra rare 6 track EP of six previously unreleased remixes of MR OIZO, RJD2, NELLY FURTADO, MADVILLIAN, and J DILLA. Groove
dis says "He flips these tracks 360 degrees and creates something totally new and unrecognizable."

A Bossa Electrica PRAIA DO FUTURO EP 12" CTVEP36518

Amy Winehouse 
NELSON MANDELA EP 7" AMY2

Colleen & Webb 
GIVE ME A CALL 12" GAMM051

Cookin' On 3 Burners 
SOUL MESSIN' LP FSRLP055

DJ Cam Presents In Love 
STORIES.. LP 6154376

DJ Twister 
BANGERS ON THE BREAKS #2 12" BOTB02

Fort Knox Five 
RADIO FREE DC RMX #7 12" FKX020

Guts 
TAKE A LOOK AROUND YOU EP 12" + CD PV12001 

Mad Mats 
BLUE EYED SOUL EP 12" GAMM050

Sharkslayer 
SO SINCERE 12" AAAHH03

Uptown Felaz 
FIRST GEAR 12" SGR12002

Various 
45 KINGS III LP FCLP012 

Battant 
BRUISE, THE BUTCHER AND OTHER ATROCITIES 12" KTDJ016

Beni 
MAXIMUS 12" KITSUNE097

Black Noise 
EP #1 12" ECB181 

Fangkiebassbeton 
BACK TO BACK REPETE 12" SPR12002

Feadz 
P'N'M'B' & ABSENT FRIENDS 12" BEC5772524

Markus Schatz 
WALKING DROPS EP 12" FRANKIE046

MSTRKRFT 
HEARTBREAKER REMIXES 12" 2171574

Pazazz 
SO HARD TO FIND 7 SAMURAI RMX 7" SPR7002

Quest & Mutiny 
STICK UP KID 12" FB059

Sebastien Tellier 
FINGERS OF STEEL 12" REC58

Various 
DUM EDGES - SAMPLER RELEASE DLP BEC5772538

Beatconductor 
HERBIE & MONGO 12" GAMM039

Beatconductor HOTTEST 12" GAMM028



New House/Disco 12"s Coming this Weekend:


OOFT
INSTRUMENTS OF RAPTURE: PT.3 12"
IOR003  

OOFT's "THIS SOUND" is an 80s style midtempo jam that builds around a large synth bass & short vocal loops. 8 mins of sweat! The flip sees THE REVENGE dig out two unreleased cuts, the meaty slo-mo disco-dub cut "HOTZ 4 U" and "HEAVY LOVE," promised on vinyl & is finally here.


Coati Mundi
NO MORE BLUES 12"
RONG029

Three track sampler from an artist that has worked with TITO PUENTE, WYCLEF JEAN, THE ROOTS, GRACE JONES, MADONNA & more. His KID CREOLE & DR. BUZZARD influences shine on this ecletic disco focused record. 

Baeka RIGHT AT IT-MICHEL CLEIS REMIX 12" REKIDS041

Lono Brazil 
DISCOUNUSUAL SOCIAL CLUB 12" CG003

Mark E 
RAY GUN & TOUCH 12" JISCO006

Sonny Fodera 
BEAT DOWN EP 12" DRM065

A Mountain Of One 
BONNIE & CLYDE 12" BONNIE1

Atjazz Domu & Yannah 
CITY MADNESS 12" DEV002

Coati Mundi 
NO MORE BLUES 12" RONG029

Dia 
ROCHES TRAVEL IN GROUP 12" VDI004

Ekkohaus 
BRIAN SAID 12" VIS183

Fluen 
BETTER DAY (LIMITED EDITION) 12" TACI002

Citizen Kane 
GHOST TOWN EP 12" GT001

Hunch 
TRAVEL THE EARTH 12" FE008

Lemonade 
BIG WEEKEND (L-VIS REMIX) 12" SBEST78

Leon 
I FOLLOW YOU-DEETRON REMIX 12" REB030

Noah & The Whale 
FIVE YEARS TIME RMX 12" GUERNICA1

OOFT 
INSTRUMENTS OF RAPTURE: PT.3 12" IOR003

Phreek Plus One 
COMPOST BL #52 12" COMP330

Sven Tasnadi 
HABANERO 12" PFR105

Uner & Coyu 
BABY RAW EP 12" DIYNAMIC028

Various 
DUFFNOTE SAMPLER 12" DUFFEP003

Various HORSE MEAT DISCO DLP STRUT046LP    


New Dubstep/Jungle 12"s Coming this Weekend:

The Wisdom of Teeth: Part III

Posted by Job O Brother, July 27, 2009 11:54am | Post a Comment

America's Next Top Model

Hello, everybody. Today is my second full day without Vicodin, and my first full week without my bottom two wisdom teeth. (The surgeon decided, after slicing my upper gums, that the teeth there could and should stay put, leading me to ask, what did he see in there that wasn't on the x-ray that changed his mind? Did my upper teeth have protection from the Insane Popes?)

As my legions of readers know, I was excited to realize my life-long dream of being put under general anesthesia; I’m happy to report that I was not disappointed.

I was led into the operating room – a tiny, square space, entirely colored in the lightest shade of grey and almost exactly what I picture when I contemplate what Hell might look like, though without the constant re-looping of “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” piped in, which I have decided will be the soundtrack to my eternal damnation.
I relaxed back into the chair and the surgeon and his nurse went to work prepping the scene. I stared at the fluorescent lighting, noting that sticker tags were still inside the fixtures, which struck me – I imagined that, if I were to have an office building of my very own, I wouldn’t want ugly manufacturing stickers glued willy-nilly over my establishment. Did these practitioners of dental artistry have no pride? Or were they so focused on peering into dark depths of mucosal tissue and alveolar bones that they never thought to cast their gaze upwards into the blinding brilliance of tubes of excited mercury vapor that adorned their ceiling and lit their paths? I mean, you guys – kind of tacky, okay?

From there I went on to consider how much nicer it would be if they had stuck some lovely picture on the ceiling for me to look at as I wait. I remembered a friend of mine – I don’t want to reveal her name, so we’ll call her President Abraham Lincoln – when a friend of mine, President Abraham Lincoln, went in for an abortion; she said that while she laid on the table, awaiting the operation, there was a colorful picture on the ceiling for her to focus on. I don’t recall what it was – something soothing like an old barn in Vermont, a kitten with a ball of yarn, or Jeff Stryker on the set of Stryker Force – something one could meditate on and forget what’s about to happen. Oh well, I figured, I wouldn’t be looking at the ceiling for long.


There now - Don't you just feel the tension in your shoulders dropping?

They tied my upper-arm off and the same thing happened that always happens when a doctor does this to me. I pictured Debbie Harry as seen on the cover of the Blondie album Parallel Lines. Without fail, when faced with this image, my eyes go right to that white armband she’s wearing. It looks so uncomfortable to me! And so, by product of association, the one thing I’m guaranteed to think of when I’m about to have my arm punctured with a syringe is Debbie Harry. And maybe a few bars of 11:59.


Post-injection, my memory is brief. I wasn’t asked to count down or anything. All the stories I’d heard had prepared me to perform some kind of trick – much like a cop puts you through when testing you for driving drunk: say the alphabet backwards, name the presidents of the United States, recite the six books of the Masnavi by Mawlānā Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī in their original Persian, etc.

None of that – I got the injection and waited. I waited as the surgeon and nurse continued to bustle and fuss, waited to become enveloped in inky blackness. Then, after about five minutes of waiting, they told me they were done.

Huh? Done?

And they were! What was five minutes of idle waiting for me was in actuality an hour of surgery. The magic of anesthesia had allowed me to time travel. I didn’t even notice the journey. So cool! I understand now why, sometimes, Kings of Pop would abuse the science for some quick R&R. Heck, if I had constant access to it, who’s to say I wouldn’t just knock myself out in-between the time it takes for the next season of Lost to be released on Blu-Ray? The convenience is just too seductive!




The next few days were spent lounging on my sofa, hopped-up on Vicodin, watching cooking shows in lieu of eating, which was too painful. I also took the opportunity of being on pain-killers to stop drinking coffee and Diet Coke, thus escaping the caffeine headache.

I’m doing well now. It still hurts to yawn – only on my right side where the sideways tooth had to be extracted, and I’m none too keen on crunchy foods just yet, so I’m having my hummus without chips and my oatmeal without freeze-dried chicken bones.

Thanks for taking this journey of discovery with me. Oh! Someone asked me if I got to keep my lost teeth, and the answer is no. If you see them on e-Bay, tell me! Also if you see a copy of The Metrics are Coming by Janeen Brady on CD or LP, I want that, too!

CHOREOGRAPHER MERCE CUNNINGHAM DIED LAST NIGHT @ AGE 90

Posted by Billyjam, July 27, 2009 09:32am | Post a Comment


The legendary American choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was highly instrumental in helping make dance a major art form and a major form of theater, died last night (July 26) in New York. He was 90. Read the full story here care of the New York Times, which accurately notes that, "With his collaborator and life partner John Cage, Mr. Cunningham’s most celebrated achievement was to have dance and music composed independent of each other." Truly committed to his art, he was active up til close to the end, as witnessed by the video above -- Mondays With Merce from just earlier this year. Below, in an older clip, is an excerpt of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company members performing Beach Birds. For more information on the late artist's influential dance company visit www.merce.org.

Argentine Hippies

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 27, 2009 01:40am | Post a Comment
This is a concert film recorded in 1972 at the Buenos Aires Rock festival and it aired on Argentine television the following year. It's mostly live footage with some skits, ala The Song Remains The Same by Led Zeppelin. However, Rock Hasta Que Se Ponga El Sol pre-dates Zep's film by a few years. I'm not saying this is where Led McZeppelin got their ideas, but they have been known to steal a few blues songs in their time... Anyways, these bands from Argentina rock hard. You can find some of these releases in Amoeba Hollywood's Latin Rock section.

Color Humano
-"Larga Vida Al Sol"/"Coto De caza"/"Cosas Rústica"


Pescado Rabioso-"Nena" (one of Luis Alberto Spinetta's great bands)


Billy Bond Y Las Pesadas Del Rock
-"Tonto"


Arco Iris (with a very young and future Oscar winner Gustavo Santaolalla on guitar) -"Zapada"

Amoeba Music Hollywood World Music Charts

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 27, 2009 12:33am | Post a Comment

Top 10 World Music Sales for the week of July 20th-26th

1. V/A Analog Africa No. 5: Legends Of Benin
2. Mahssa - Vol.1-Oyun Havasi
3. V/A - Sound Of Wonder!
4. V/A - Panama 2!
5. Amadou & Mariam - Welcome To Mali
6. V/A - Rudo Y Cursi Soundtrack
7. Goran Bregovic - Welcome To Bregovic
8. Joyce - Visions of Dawn
9. Selda - S/T
10. 11 albums tied at 10



Top 10 World Music Sales for July (so far)

1. Mahssa - Vol.1-Oyun Havasi
2. V/A Analog Africa No. 5: Legends Of Benin
3. V/A - Panama! 2
4. Bebe -Y.
5. Chico Sonido - S/T
6. V/A - Black Rio 2 : Original Samba Soul 1971-1980
7. Eydie Gorme - Cantan En Español
8. V/A - Sound Of Wonder
9. Goran Bregovic - Welcome To Bregovic
10. 4 albums tied at 10

Do to an unforeseen glitch in the Amoeba Hollywood database, the mix CD by Amoeba Hollywood’s very own Mahssa was accidentally omitted from all the World Music charts up til now. A thousand apologies go out Mahssa and all those who have been deprived of her Middle Eastern Psychedelic mix CD, Oyun Havasi Vol.1. Released by B-Music in May, this tasty treat of Turkish, Persian and Arabic Psyche rockers could serve as a guide to explore the many gems hidden in Amoeba Hollywood’s Middle Eastern section. Only drawback to the mix CD is there is no track list. So if you love the sound of Turkish Rock and Iranian Psychedelic Folk, one has to dig, just like Mahssa has. No cheating allowed!

Speaking of B-Music, the latest installment in their Finders Keepers series is Sound Of Wonder!, focusing on Pakistan's little known-to-westerners “Lollywood” sound. What is Lollywood, you say? Lollywood was a tongue in cheek term made up in the late 80’s by Glamour Magazine gossip columnist Saleem Nasir because the Pakistani films that rivaled the Bollywood films were all filmed in the city of Lahore…get it? The Pakistani film industry thrived, much like India’s film industry, but had little success outside of Pakistan’s borders. The music on this compilation sounds like a low-fi, spaced out version of Bollywood music with more edge and Urdu lyrics. Most of the tracks on this compilation are done by composer M. Ashraf and singer Nahid Akhtar, with one track containing the legendary Noor Jehan, the legendary Pakistani singer who recorded over 10,000 songs in her lifetime and was the first female Pakistani film director. Of all the Finder Keepers releases, I feel this one is their strongest to date. Also available on LP.

Another strong showing on the chart is the latest Analog Africa series, Legends Of Benin. Along with the African Scream Contest release that came out last year and this release, African funk enthusiasts may forsake Nigeria for Benin if they keep bringing this heat. Also charting strongly, French/Balkan Goran Bregovic's collection of hits perked some ears up, especially after he wowed the audience at his L.A. show back in June. People spoke of dancing in the aisles and some, on stage. I was invited to the show but passed it up, and now I’m kind of kicking myself for missing it. Next time, next time.

Finally, after two years of hyping Chico Sonido, his self-titled release is out at last and it’s number five in our July chart. Perhaps this release could easily be placed in our Electronica department, because it has more to do with DJ Shadow, DJ Cam or even Cut Chemist than it has to do with anything Latin Alternative, but we love this release so much we simply hijacked it. Imagine nineties hip-hop beats with fuzzed out Drag Strip guitars, seventies “Musica Romanticas” minus a vocalist and a discothèque located in an airport and that might give you an idea of what this album sounds like. All in all, it was worth the wait.

Vinyl Confidential, 1.2 – the odd order of oblong boxes

Posted by Whitmore, July 26, 2009 10:15pm | Post a Comment
The record geek can be recognized in his home by the lovingly quick glance he gives the album covers framed on his walls -- next to the original Family Dog, Fillmore and Frank Kozik posters -- a look both swift and penetrating, but thoughtful, as if he was recapturing a fine moment ... or simply undressing them. This is either followed by pained reverential silence or a thought in his head like, “I really wish I could find a Japanese or Thai pressing of that record.” The record geek will stand back from the framed album at a distance, his head slightly cocked to one side, in his hand a Scotch or Irish whiskey, eventually, after a long moment of wishing or searching Ebay, he -- and it is always a he -- will cautiously slink forward to within a millimeter of the frame, study the blur of lines and color in the cover art and remember being fourteen years old again. Then he'll return to his former distant position by the sliding door in the living room, give the framed art piece one last glance, wander over to his stereo system and play the Import CD version of that very record, grimace as he recognizes the inferior digital sound of the classic disc he still can’t believe everybody doesn't own. He sighs exhaustively. But that’s where the Scotch comes in; he pours himself one more drink, collapses in his mid-century arm chair and contemplates a better tomorrow.  

July 26, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, July 26, 2009 09:30pm | Post a Comment


House vinyl blow out @ Amoeba Hollywood!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 26, 2009 08:13pm | Post a Comment
 

Technophilia, The Trailer Hitch of Realism: Previewing Alvin and The Chipmunks: The Squeakquel, Despicable Me, and Alice in Wonderland

Posted by Charles Reece, July 26, 2009 09:43am | Post a Comment
One thought that never crosses my mind when watching a classic Bugs cartoon is how it could be  improved with a richer palette of colors, more shading for 3-dimensional effect and a better use of perspective -- you know, so it would appear as if this anatomically incorrect bunny might actually exist in our world. Call me crotchety, but I don't like aesthetics being reduced to technology. Just because the average Macbook now has millions of colors at its disposal, this shouldn't matter a whit to a modern audience watching an old Chuck Jones cartoon. But it does, if the average CGI-toon that dominates production is any indication.

When Casper the Friendly Ghost received the CGI treatment, he became a true monstrosity, a virtually embodied horror, the mishapen spectral remant of a literalized infanticide. Yet, it was in a movie aimed at kids and no one seemed to mind. If he'd been covered in blood, I suspect it would've been a different story. In The Philosophy of Horror, Noël Carroll suggests two major defining features of the monster proper: that (1) the creature be threatening and (2) it be impure. Now, it's probably not much of an overgeneralization to suggest few feel threatened by Casper, not even by his 3D deformity. But he's clearly impure in two ways: First, obviously, he's undead, kind of like a zombie, but one who's rational and apparently takes showers. That is, he violates the cognitive categories we have for what living and dead bodies are supposed to behave like -- mixes the contents. Second, and perhaps less obviously, in the 3D version, he is a violation of the formal abstraction that was part of his 2D cartoon body. This formal impurity wouldn't have existed had the animators decided to go with a realistic form for their adaptation, something like the ghosts in Peter Jackson's The Frighteners.

Perhaps my own revulsion at Casper's (or any) realistic cartoonishness is informed by a recurring childhood nightmare wherein I was trying to escape a carnivalesque labyrinth while avoiding the four-fingered clutches of a monster who looked a lot like Madame sitting in one of those coin-operated fortune-telling machines. Sometimes she would be a cartoon, other times a puppet, but her mitts were always fleshy and grotesque. When the "wish it into the cornfield" episode of Twilight Zone was remade for the movie, with the omnipotent kid (originally played by Billy Mumy) conjuring cartoons into his reality, it dredged up all kinds of phobia for me.

Had the 3D animators chosen to increase Casper's literalism with dashes of gooey blood, the demographic family might've found the style as threatening and horrific as I, even if the character behaved in the same cuddly manner. The second half of these flesh and blood cartoons must remain implicit, because versimilitude isn't ultimately the point -- the wanton display of technology is. It's a despotic aesthetic when style is driven solely by the "because we can" of technology -- nothing but a licentious technophilia. Showing Casper's bloody ties to reality would've actually given the "live action" version a raison d'etre, forcing the realism to serve a darkly comic purpose. Instead, all the computer added to Casper was the ability to watch real people interact with cartoons in a more "realistic" (i.e., technophiliac) style than was possible back in the days of, say, Song of The South. But wasn't the attraction of "old fashioned" cartoons to enter a fantasy where anything was possible? Didn't the moral play of Who Framed Roger Rabbit? teach us that when the twain of physical and cartoon worlds meet, it's because of evil machinations?

I guess not:

Fragging with the Tombstone neighbor! -- a history of New Orleans's Tombstone Records

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 25, 2009 01:44pm | Post a Comment


This blog entry is a look back at one of New Orleans's more obscure hip-hip labels, Tombstone. Tombstone Records was a notable New Orleans Rap label in the 1990s that released a handful of high caliber releases that sold over 100,000 albums around the South in three years before abruptly ceasing operations after a series of cataclysmic misfortunes.

It was founded by Elton “June” Wicker Jr. Most of the production was done by Merrill “Real Roc” Robinson, who also worked for Mobo. Other production was done by Ice Mike and the one-and-only Mannie Fresh. The label's biggest commercial success was the uncontested "Queen of Bounce," Cheeky Blakk, whose 1996 album Let Me Get That Outcha was a massive local hit for Tombstone before she jumped ship for Total Respect. Tombstone apparently operated on a shoestring budget with pleasingly dinky synths, cheap album covers and no music videos -- but unlike many local New Orleans labels of the 1990s, Tombstone seems to have been more fully committed to the compact disc format than most of their peers, forsaking the cassette for almost every artist.



 
The scene at Joseph S. Cark (left), the scene at a New Orleans Popeye's (right)

Wicker attended Joseph S. Clark High School and Americo Technical Institute and he started dating his future wife Kim when she was thirteen. They ultimately had two children, Elton III and Kerrionne. Wicker wasn't necessarily a saint in the eyes of the law at first. There was an aggravated assault charge in 1990 and a charge of possession and distribution of llello in 1991. But he seemed to turn a leaf, working at Southern Scrap and Popeye's Chicken and Biscuits with the dream of starting his own record label. That label was Tombstone, named after the George P. Cosmatos film starring Val Kilmer and some other people. After that, not only did Wicker run Tombstone Records, he also founded the Tombstone Basketball League and Cool Spot Baseball League for neighborhood kids, volunteered for the Goretti Saints and bought Christmas toys for the kids on the block.

1994

AMOEBLOG'S SUMMER GRAFFITI SERIES: PART III

Posted by Billyjam, July 25, 2009 11:47am | Post a Comment



Above is a quick, one-minute hand-held video clip of the graffiti on the outside wall of Amoeba Music San Francisco on Haight Street with music by my man OCDJ out of Baltimore. So popular has this wall become that most times when I stop by to gaze at its vibrant, colorful beauty I run into other graf fans who have traveled from as far away as Japan to take pictures or video of the graffiti. But just how good is this Amoeba wall graffiti? Apparently it is so good that photos of it are being sold. One photographer named Lee, who I ran into at the outdoor Friday market down by the Embarcadero across from the Ferry Building, was selling prints of the Amoeba wall graffiti image with the male characters (at about the 40 second mark in video above) for $40. And they are very popular, I was informed, especially with visitors to San Francisco.

Entourage is the Answer To an Age-Old Dilemma...

Posted by Miss Ess, July 24, 2009 05:40pm | Post a Comment
vs.

As seems to be the case in many a household, the boyfriend and I are constantly at odds when it comes to the tv remote. I seem to have developed a not-so-controllable Bravo obsession, while for him, any time a broad shouldered man with a military-esque haircut, abnormally sparkling teeth and a mic headset spouts off sports stats of any nature behind a desk, he's hooked. And then there's NBA finals...for months and months it seems...but I digress...

However, my friends, all is not lost for our tv addicted heroes!


The cure, we have found, is Entourage. It equally and simultaneously satisfies his need for male-driven, bro-ing-down, fast paced drama (a la the sporting world), and my enjoyment of entertainment insider business jargon plus relationship drama between friends, lovers and coworkers.

In fact, I once postulated that Entourage is the new, straight male oriented Sex and the City.

We are currently in the midst of Season 5 at my home, which just came out on DVD. While the show has taken a bit of a hit with the critics, the boyfriend and I still can agree that it is one of the only shows we both can't get enough of. While this season meanders some and perhaps isn't as sharp as others, I am willing to give Vince & Co the benefit of the doubt and am hopeful for a strong, Travolta-style comeback for Season 6, which is currently airing on HBO.

Besides, if Vince, Ari, Drama, Turtle and E can bring together a couple of crazy kids like us for some TV QT, what's not to love?

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP (VIDEO VERSION): 07:24:09

Posted by Billyjam, July 24, 2009 03:11pm | Post a Comment


Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Weekly Top Six: 07:24:09 by Luis

1) Eyedea & Abilities By The Throat (Rhymesayers Entertainment)

2) Awol One & Factor Owl Hours (Fake Four Inc)

3) Twista Category F5 (GMG/Get Money Gang/EMI)

4) Yukmouth The West Coast Don (Smoke-A-Lot/RBC Records)

5) Biz Markie Ultimate Diabolical (Traffic Entertainment)

6) MHZ Table Scraps (Man Bites Dog Records)

Classic Hip-Hop Album Reissue:

The Beastie Boys Ill Communication (Capitol) (originally released in '94 -- extra tracks)

Super-duper thanks to Luis -- the hip-hop buyer at Amoeba Music San Francisco -- for providing this week's Top Six chart of the new hip-hop sellers at the Haight Street store, in both text and video formats. In the number one slot with a bullet is the new By The Throat album from Eyedea & Abilities, on which Michael "Eyedea" Larsen (aka Oliver Hart) demonstrates the mad mic skills that won him his rep as a killer cagefreestyle battle rapper. Meanwhile, his partner, DMC champ DJ Abilities (Gregory Keltgen), has truly come into his own as a powerful producer with turntable skills to match. Fans of the duo should note that they are on the Rock The Bells tour, which will be stopping in SoCal at the San Manuel Amphitheatre in San Bernardino on August 8th and in the Bay Area the next day, August 9th, at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View.

gentlemen take polaroids?

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 24, 2009 01:45pm | Post a Comment










This Week At The New Beverly: July 24-30

Posted by phil blankenship, July 23, 2009 11:48pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our August calendar is now online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday July 24 & 25


As the economic downturn persists and exotic travel seems more and more unaffordable, your best chance for a getaway this summer may very well be this weekend at the New Beverly.
- Tim Grierson, LA Weekly; Read the full spotlight here.

Tokyo! (2008)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0976060/
dir. Michel Gondry, Leos Carax & Joon-ho Bong
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:00 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

New Electronic CD Releases 7/23/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 23, 2009 05:03pm | Post a Comment

MORITZ VON OSWALD TRIO
Vertical Ascent CD
Honest Jon's

This is the highly-anticipated debut full-length release by The Moritz von Oswald Trio, comprised of members Moritz von Oswald (Basic Channel, Rhythm & Sound), Max Loderbauer (NSI, Sun Electric), and Vladislav Delay (Luomo). Through Basic Channel and Rhythm And Sound -- his collaborations with Mark Ernestus -- Moritz von Oswald first of all conjured from thin air, then comprehensively mapped out the grounds of a deep exchange between real-deal Jamaican dub and classic, Detroit-style techno. The duo's accomplishment and influence are immense. The repercussions of their work within electronic dance music have been incalculable. Though a departure, Vertical Ascent retraces various signatures of the earlier styles -- the fastidious density of sound, the massive bass and detailed upper registers ("a frequency massage," Ricardo Villalobos has called the album), the stripped, stepping repetitiousness, the seriousness. The striking differences stem from the qualities of live performance (the driving, clattering percussion in particular, and the loose, improvisatory approach), the exploded palette of sounds, including a trace of steel drums, something like a cuica -- and of course, most of all -- the fresh line-up. Vladislav Delay is a drummer and electronic musician from Finland -- like von Oswald, trained in classical percussion (while the third member studied classical piano for 20 years) -- who released a landmark album on Basic Channel's Chain Reaction imprint, before working with a diversity of artists (under pseudonyms like Luomo and Sistol), from Massive Attack to the Scissor Sisters. On Vertical Ascent, he plays home-made metal percussion. From Munich, Max Loderbauer was a partner in the ambient duo Sun Electric. Behind the scenes, his work has ranged between Tresor and Can's Spoon Records. In 2004 he teamed up with Tobias Freund to form NSI (Non Standard Institut). On Vertical Ascent, he plays synthesizers, alongside von Oswald, who also contributes Fender Rhodes and additional percussion. At the heart of Vertical Ascent is a dream crossing of Basic Channel, Larry Heard and Can -- as at home with calypso as it is Stravinsky.

SCRATCH GUITAR PIONEER THE GENIE IS NEVER FAR FROM AMOEBA

Posted by Billyjam, July 23, 2009 01:23pm | Post a Comment

San Francisco avant garde guitarist The Genie, who plays tonight at 111 Minna as part of a must-see, multi-artist show featuring the Lions of Kush from St. Croix, has long been connected to Amoeba Music in some form or fashion. Like many local independent artists, he has had all of his independent releases for sale at Amoeba Music. Beyond that, The Genie, who pioneered the 'scratch guitar" and who over the years has collaborated with numerous artists including Talvin Singh, who invited him to Europe earlier this year to perform, has also performed onstage at the San Francisco Amoeba Music. That was on July 16, 2004, for an instore performance to promote the release of The Genie's debut CD Rebel Music. Also that same year the artist appeared on the Amoeba Music Compilation Vol. V with the track "Before The World Goes." In the time since then, The Genie has never strayed too far from Amoeba, it seems. Two years ago he was featured here on the Amoeblog and he is frequently spotted both inside Amoeba SF (usually digging for hard to find music) as well as right outside the Haight Street store, where he is known to have inspired impromptu performances. Check out the videos above and below, filmed recently outside the SF Amoeba when the artist pulled up in his ride right outside the store, popped some quarters in the parking meter, and proceeded to have an engaging sidewalk show ("Amoeba out-store," I guess you could call it, as opposed to an "in-store"), much to the delight of the small crowd that stopped, gathered and applauded loudly. I hadn't seen or talked with The Genie in a couple of years, so I was anxious to catch up with the always innovative artist to ask him about his music and also about tonight's show at 111 Minna.

Jessie Evans, The Vanishing Lady, Returns To California

Posted by Aaron Detroit, July 23, 2009 11:23am | Post a Comment
Greetings and Salutations!! Welcome to the inaugural post of Amoeba’s Black Light District, a new weekly(ish) blog where we shall traverse in the darker realms of the musical & subcultural universe (i.e. Death Rock, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Transgressive Fiction, Dark Wave, Apocalyptic Folk, Goth, Black Metal, B-Movies, Doom Disco, Synthpop, Ethereal Nu-Gaze, Neo-New Beat, Death-Twee, Infernal Drone and all manner of night-friendly sounds and darkly delights! *cue Evil Doctor laugh). Come forth, for we own the night!

This week, California’s prodigal dark queen,
Jessie Evans, jessie evans is it fire?returns for shows in San Francisco and Los Angeles to promote her debut solo LP, Is It Fire? (Fantomette Records). Jessie spent nearly a decade in the California Punk and Death-Rock scenes honing her chops singing and wailing James Chance-style on her trusty saxophone (as well as a few other instruments!) in bands like The Vanishing and the now rather legendary Subtonix.

The Vanishing relocated from San Francisco to Berlin in 2004 but split up soon after, leaving Jessie free for new ventures.
Autonervous, initially a solo project, blossomed into a collaborative project between Evans and Bettina Koster (of the '80s German band MALARIA!). The duo released an LP and toured in 2006. Autonervous marked a heavy shift in direction for Ms. Evans -- her songwriting became more sultry and less incendiary, her lyrics more minimal and focused. Also bubbling under the dancey beats was a new sense of joy. Egads! Her grimace was turning into a smile!

On Is It Fire? that smile has turned into full-on laughte
r, and audibly s
o! It’s not an evil-kind of laughter either, on the interlude track “Micheladas,” Evans can be heard clinking glasses and laughing joyously. The album is indeed a celebration of dark glamour, love and sexuality, from the daring come-on of "Scientist of Love" and the House-y statement of intent, “Let Me On,” on to the horn-y swing of the Autonervous re-take “Golden Snake” and the dark and dreamy sway of “Black Sand” with its chant of “It’s time to get into your body.”

Evans didn’t party completely alone though; in fact, she brought in some heavy-hitters, literally. Both
Toby Dammit (Swans, Iggy Pop), and Budgie (Siouxsie & The Banshees) share time behind the drum-kit on the album. Evans’ arrangements focus heavily on beat and rhythm, which adds greatly to the primal and sexual mood of the album, whilst Budgie ‘s presence definitely lends to some Creatures-esque moments. Also under Evans' employ is horn-blower Martin Wenk (Calexico), and an International Children’s choir. This lady throws one crazy shindig!

Half of Is It Fire? was recorded at home in Berlin while the other half was recorded in Jessie’s newest beloved city, Tijuana (Evans pays tribute en Español on 3 tracks). Evans’ ridiculously long list of credible contributors gets longer with production and mixing duties handled by Thomas Stern (Einstürzende Neubauten, Crime and The City Solution) in Berlin and Pepe Mogt (Nortec Collective) in Tijuana.

Regardless of its more famous contributors, Is It Fire? at the end of the day is still Jessie’s party. Her vocals are steamy, not screamy, and her saxophone is booty-shakin’, not siren-screechin’. Is It Fire? stands (so far) as Evans’ crown jewel in an already stellar back-catalog.





Jessie Evans is bringing the Fire party (with Toby Dammit in-tow!) to the Eagle Tavern in San Francisco tonight and to Los Angeles’ Silver Factory Studios on Friday. Don’t forget to bring your party-hat (and/or mask) and dancing shoes!

LIMITED copies on CD and LP of Is It Fire? will hopefully be on the shelves by next week at both Amoeba SF and Amoeba Hollywood!


Also next week, Amoeba Hollywood should be getting very limited copies of Cold Cave’s debut LP Love Comes Close. Look for a review of that right here next week, but consensus around the Hollywood Store for those that have heard the LP is that it’s a heavy contender for Album Of The Year.


Amoeba Hollywood’s Goth/Industrial Section Featured New Releases:

Rome - Flowers from Exile CD [Trisol]
Great New Full-Length at DOMESTIC price!

Les Paradisiers - More Tales From The Garden LIMITED vinyl LP + MP3 card [Disques De Lapin]
Awesome full-length new collaboration between Thomas Nola and O Paradis! Swinging dark cabaret!

Tor Lundvall - Sleeping and Hiding Limited vinyl LP [Dais]
Dais is flawless! Not a bad release in the bunch! Dreamy bliss in the vein of Talk Talk’s later stuff and Slowdive’s Pygmalion.

Death In June - Braun Buch Zwei CD [Neroz]
(Digitally remastered edition was the bonus CD accompanying the 20th Anniversary Stone Circle Edition of DIJ’s seminal Brown Book album issued in 2007, and contains 7 songs from the original album coupled with 7 remixed, re-recorded and rare versions of the remaining songs. Basically, it’s Brown Book II. The completely recycled paper booklet and 'Repak' is brown with black 'Ultra Coated' images and runes featuring never-before-seen photos from the period.)

Dense Vision Shrine - Unwinding The Inside LIMITED CD [r.a.p.]

Njurmannen - Terror in The Dollhouse [Old Europa Cafe]

Naevus - Truffles of Love (Remastered Reissue) [Old Europa Cafe]


In Next Week, Amoeba Hollywood:

Nachtmahr - Alle Lust Will Ewigkeit CD [Trisol]

Cold Cave -
Love Comes Close LP [Heartworm/Insound] (Limited Copies on This!)

We.Got.this.Far -
Bluntforcevolume CD [Spiral Chords]


Coming Soon:

New Minimal Wave Titles!

Hot Used Section Tip: Amoeba Hollywood has a few copies of the excellent Rhino 4-Disc box set A Life Less Lived-- full of goodies by The Cure, Siouxsie, Sisters of Mercy, et al. 3 CDs of 53 Goth Essentials and 12 iconic Goth videos on DVD packaged with an extensive book in a faux-leather lace-up slipcase! Used for only $29.99 !

DANGEROUS MEN Saturday at the New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, July 23, 2009 10:29am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!


Saturday July 25

John S. Rad's

Dangerous Men


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7


August
August 1 The Dungeonmaster (1985)
He is the overlord of strange beasts & stolen souls... Empire Pictures mini-classic that is Not On DVD!

August 8 Gremlins (1984)
25th Anniversary! Don't get him wet, keep him out of bright light, and never feed him after midnight.

August 15 Halloween II (1981)
The Nightmare Isn't Over - First screening of a BRAND NEW 35mm print!

Total BFF: Blonde Redhead w/ Thee Oh Sees at the Independent courtesy of the Bicycle Film Fest.

Posted by Kells, July 22, 2009 05:44pm | Post a Comment

Two years ago when Blonde Redhead performed on the Amoeba stage in San Francisco, they graciously agreed to sit down with me and submit to a few questions. I remember the experience as one of the most awkwardly delicious moments I've ever winced my way through, however giddily. From the first listen I've loved Blonde Redhead's melancholy music in all its precious, tragic beauty; to me they are the snow white choking on the poison apple of "indie" rock. And so there I was, sitting across from this trio of "damaged lemons," three persons whose music had so phenomenally impacted my life in ways I could barely discuss without donning a veil of embarassment (nerd alert!), trying to be cool, calm and collected. The silence in the room was uncomfortably palpable, until drummer Simone Pace cracked a joke.

I have adopted from a friend a habit of cataloguing my music according to the weather or the seasons of the year. For example, a band like the Descendents, with their anything goes punk rock songs about life, love and fishing ("and stuff") could only be categorized as summer music, whereas something like Blue by Joni Mitchell would be played habitually during the winter and/or on brisk, rainy days. I asked Blonde Redhead where they thought they'd place their music within the confines of such a classification system and, after Kazu explained her way to the conclusion that perhaps winter favored their "cold" sound for all its detatchment and sadness (anyone could agree with that, I feel), Simone offered with a sigh, "c'mon guys, we've been trying for that summer hit for years!" The moments that followed flowed free of tension, with a good amount of laughter. That interview, however clumsily conducted on my part, was a pleasure that I'm as likely to never forget, as Blonde Redhead is capable of ever cranking out a number one summer jam, but I could be wrong.

Or I could be right. Last week the Bicycle Film Festival sponsored a show at the Independent where Blonde Redhead played nothing but sullen, sober "winter" jams from their latest two albums (plus two hits from their fifth record, Melody of Certain Damaged Lemons) without packing anything like a heat wave inducing rocker or hippy hippy shaking big bopper of a punch. Local band Thee Oh Sees, on the other hand, who opened the show for Blonde Redhead, totally slam dunked a summer-sweat dripping set of fuzzy, fuck-off rock rattlers --- nothin' but net! Having listened to their new record Help to the point of fatigue, I found it hard not to get excited about their live performance. Their stage presence is perhaps best described as geeks pogo-ing the border between self-destruction and pro-active party crashing; or, what you get when you pay whatever you think a 100% f-u-n rock n' roll show is worth. Plus they "rode their bikes" to the venue that night --- way to be supportive ya'll, A+. And Blonde Redhead, on their part, designed one of a kind Bicycle Film Festival t-shirts especially for the occasion, A++.

So, in conclusion, Bicycle Film Festival: they put together killer events (thanks guys)! Thee Oh Sees: absolutely fantastic live rock show; see them soon or whenever you possibly can because why? It is so worth it. Blonde Redhead: I've said it repeatedly in the past and I'll say it again, I can't wait to see them again when they come round next time. I'm still holding out for a slice of their possible summer sounds even if the pursuit is fruitless, and I'll champion them 'til the end regardless. Hopefully when they return they'll have a new album beneath their wings and a penchant for playing some of their older songs which, sadly, I have to say, have been absent from their live set lists for more than long enough. Suimasen.



The Wisdom of Teeth: Part II

Posted by Job O Brother, July 22, 2009 05:27pm | Post a Comment

July 20, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, July 22, 2009 10:45am | Post a Comment







VIDEO MASHUP MASTERS ECLECTIC METHOD AMOEBLOG INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, July 22, 2009 08:08am | Post a Comment
Eclectic Method
Audio Visual remix masters Eclectic Method will be in town tomorrow performing in San Francisco at the Mezzanine along with the screening of RIP: A Remix Manifesto by Brett Gaylor. SInce forming seven years ago, the group, featuring London natives Jonny Wilson, Ian Edgar and Geoff Gamlen, has been developing its style of audio-visual mash-ups in the Coldcut tradition and has caught the attention of many artists, including U2, who have asked the band to remix their audio.visual material. They've also been commissioned by such companies as Motown to remix music videos, and hired by such tech companies as Apple.
Eclectic Method's SF show should be really good -- especially since the group has a reputation for always delivering unique and different performances each time they play live. In fact, it should be a really entertaining night, between their perfromance, the film screening, plus music by hometown mashup DJs Adrian & the Mysterious D from popular party Bootie SF who, when asked by the Amoeblog what to expect, said,"The best in bootleg mashups, expect to play a musical guessing game with the DJs, and to hear your favorite songs in bizarre and unexpected new ways." I recently caught up with the three members of Eclectic Method, who should never be called "VJs," to interview them for the Amoeblog. That conversation follows immediately below an excerpt of one of their live mashups that incorporates, among other things, The Darkness, Run DMC, and Vanilla Ice.

house music blow out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 22, 2009 02:41am | Post a Comment
 

ARE YOU EXPERIENCED Mr. HENDRIX?

Posted by Billyjam, July 21, 2009 05:21pm | Post a Comment

Thanks to my DJ buddy Frank O"Toole for forwarding me the "Jimi Hendrix goes for a job interview" comic clip on the left, which got me thinking about the late guitarist and how influential his music continues to be to this day. It also got me thinking about how both Hendrix's music and his image seem to consistantly remain at the forefront of popular culture, even all these years later-- close to four full decades since his tragic death at age 27.

The 1967 album Are You Experienced was the debut by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the power trio rounded out by bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell. Offering up a frenzied feast of feedback and distorted guitar, the album delivered rock music unheard of up until that point -- music that managed to be both experimental and accessible at the same time.

The album would be instrumental in propeling the Seattle born Hendrix, who had relocated to the UK, to international stardom. Besides the title track, among the other great eleven tracks on the debut LP (which can be found readily in CD and vinyl format at Amoeba Music) were "Foxy Lady," "Red House," "Fire," and "3rd Stone from the Sun." The album, which was released with different cover art on each side of the Atlantic, was hugely successful all over, including in the UK, where it premiered. There the album reached #2 on the best selling charts, right behind The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Heinz Edelmann 1934 - 2009

Posted by Whitmore, July 21, 2009 01:11pm | Post a Comment

Graphic designer Heinz Edelmann, best known for his work as the art director of the classic animated Beatles film Yellow Submarine, has died; he was 75. Edelmann died in a Stuttgart, Germany hospital not far from Stuttgart Academy of Fine Arts where he taught design for many years. No cause of death was announced.
 
Heinz Edelmann was born in 1934 in Aussig, Czechoslovakia. He studied at the Duesseldorf Art Academy and upon graduation became a freelance graphic designer. In 1961 Heinz Edelmann began teaching design, illustration and animation design at various art schools in Holland and Germany. As a graphic designer, Edelmann is mostly known for his advertising and poster work, especially for the broadcasting station Westdeutscher Rundfunk and his innovative book cover designs for the publishing house Klett-Cotta, which includes the first German edition of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings in 1971. Edelmann in 1989 won the competition to design the mascot of Seville's Expo '92 World Fair, beating out two dozen other entries with his illustration of a pudgy bird with a rainbow plume and conical beak named Curro.
 
But his greatest fame stems from his art direction for the 1968 film Yellow Submarine; he also received co-credit for the script. Edelmann was originally hired for only eight weeks to create the design for the film, but wound up working for almost an entire year. Because of the lack of direction, an incomplete screenplay, and the enormous deadline pressure -- the producers reserved the July 17, 1968 date for the debut at The London Pavillion before the production was even finished -- Edelmann took on the long ordeal personally. Sleeping only four hours most every night, he led some 200-plus artists to create a visionary work that would be worthy of the most famous band in the world. Edelmann’s health took a major nosedive; he said it took almost two years to recover from the project. Needless to say, Yellow Submarine left a somewhat sour taste in his mouth. On top of that, Yellow Submarine has sometimes been inaccurately attributed to one of the most famous artist of the era, Peter Max. However Edelmann, along with another of his contemporaries, Milton Glaser, is thought to have pioneered the 1960’s psychedelic style for which Max would later become famous. According to Edelmann and film producer Al Brodax, Max had nothing to do with the production. But other notable illustrators did work on the film including Paul Driessen, Tony Cuthbert, Ron Campbell, and the film’s overall director George Dunning (he also worked on the Beatles cartoon series), who created the "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" sequence.

Freedy Johnston's 'Perfect' Pop Gem: I'll Buy THAT for a dollar!

Posted by Mark Beaver, July 20, 2009 09:25pm | Post a Comment

Freedy Johnston
came out of Kansas and played around New York until he got signed by Bar/None Records, who released his debut, Trouble Tree in 1990. Trouble Tree was well received, but it was 1992's Can You Fly that got Johnston's name and songs bouncing all around college radio.

I've always thought of Freedy Johnston as the lost member of the Db's. He has a pristine pop quality to his voice and the stories he writes have the same almost-too-clever and slightly melancholic take on relationships that made the Db's' Amplifier the deservedly huge college rock classic that it became.

In 1994 I was working at SF's Reckless Records of London, an arguably cool and decidedly tiny record store on upper Haight St. As always, I was listening to anything I could get my hands on. Johnston's This Perfect World happened across the counter and stopped me in my tracks just by the power of its sheer completeness.

Produced by Butch Vig (Garbage) and featuring contributions from Graham Maby (Joe Jackson Band), Kevin Salem (Dumptruck), Marshall Crenshaw, Marc Ribot, Mark Spencer (Blood Oranges) and David Schramm, who worked repeatedly with the Db's' Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple, This Perfect World is a perfect pop record. Most of it is deeply written, deeply produced and played rock-pop, though in places ("Gone Like the Water") it reveals Johnston's beloved folk-country roots. I've heard the criticism that Butch Vig sucked the edge out of it in the production, but I wasn't noticing that in 1994 and don't really notice it today, 15 years later, listening to it (still) from beginning to end.

Freedy Johnston's name is not one heard around these parts much anymore and, clacking my way through the Clearance Rock bins, I came across a mint CD priced at the lowliest price of $1.00. I'm tempted to just buy them and put them in people's hands. Here...make your life a little happier...and just a little sadder, too.

Oh yeah...I guess the title track was a highlight of the Kingpin soundtrack.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 07/24/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 20, 2009 06:07pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

 

 

 

Redshape 
2010 EP 12"
78DSR

2010 is a deep techno journey into space. Synths swarm, distant sounds weave in and out of the tracks. "WHITE" sounds a bit more housey, but using clever edits and textures to keep it REDSHAPE style. EP closes with the cut "VIOLET," a warm electro/techno track.



Gold Panda
MIYAMAE EP 12"
VARS023

Three track EP from the hotly tipped GOLD PANDA, who takes a break from remixing LITTLE BOOTS, SMD, and BLOC PARTY to drop his debut artist EP on VARIOUS PRODUCTIONS. A mix of Japanese sounding techno with dubstep rhythms and house influenced basslines.  



Ruckus Roboticus REMIX EP 12" RRREP 

The Moon missions and the children of Major Tom -- the end of the space age and the music that followed

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 20, 2009 03:58pm | Post a Comment

It's the 40th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and looking back at that achievement it's obvious that one of the many repercussions was evinced in the music of the era. In addition to the space rock of bands like Pink Floyd and Hawkwind and sci-fi minded funk acts like Funkadelic, the glam rock scene, which exploded around the same time, is one of the most obvious manifestations. For a couple of years, glam rock was massively popular in several countries and it spawned hordes of mylar-and-make-up-wearing rockers singing about extraterrestrial love and lonely planet boys. On December 7, 1972, the Apollo 17 was the last manned mission to the moon and the space age, shortly after, seems to have drawn quietly to a close. Glam rock seemed to fizzle shortly afterward, but maybe it just went underground, seeking out new frontiers in a different set of clothes.



First, in 1973, David Bowie retired his extraterrestrial Ziggy Stardust and released Aladdin Sane. Although hardly a radical departure, it was famously hyped as "Ziggy goes to America" and represented Bowie's efforts to move in a new direction. Then, in early 1974, glam rock's creator Marc Bolan announced that "Glam rock is dead." His February release, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tomorrow - A Creamed Cage in August, was described by its creator as "cosmic soul." Bowie described his next direction as "plastic soul" shortly afterward. Glam's two most important stars seemed committed to moving on in spirit, if perhaps overstating the change in their music.



At the peak of glam's popularity, a slew of teen idols flooded the charts with a highly commercial T Rex-inspired version of glam, largely courtesy of RAK Records and Bell Records. By stripping away most of artistic and thematic pretensions of earlier glam, these acts made a glam racket that was recognizable in sound but more oriented toward teen idolatry than the sci-fi decadence and often distinguished as glitter rock.

 

Anyone that dared affect arty, theatrical or androgynous trappings was doomed to critical derision and/or commercial disinterest. Two who did (and were martyred in the press for it) were Cockney Rebel and Jobriath & the Creatures of the Street. Having both released their first records in 1973, they were unfairly criticized as mere glam-rock-come-latelies attempting to fill the void left by Bowie. In many ways, they were the vanguard of a new crop of glam rockers who were undoubtedly inspired by The Dame but in no way mere clones and traded many of his sci-fi aspects for the decadent sophistication associated with Roxy Music (and Bowie). Several would find a measure of popularity (though in no cases approaching the heights of TRextasy) but more remained underground, with their hype usually surpassing their sales.

In fact, many probably would reject the notion that they were glam at all, as their brand of hard-pop drew from progressive rock, soul, disco and a variety of other genres. But what unites the artists of this so-called second wave of glam is the retention of the early glam spirit that left them at odds with the corduroy/beardy/chevy van/whiskey-chugging aesthetics that marked most rock of the era.

 

1973 Cockney Rebel - The Human Menagerie, Jobriath - Jobriath






    brett smiley breathlessly brett    another pretty face 21st century rock  Skyhooks Living in the 70's
 
1974 Cockney Rebel - The Psychmodo, Sailor - Sailor, Jobriath - Creatures of the Street, Brett Smiley - Breathlessly Brett, Paul Williams - The Phantom of the Paradise, Another Pretty Face - 21st Century Rock, Zolar X - "Space Age Love" b/w "Energize Me," Skyhooks - Living in the 70's








 


Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel Best Years of Our Lives   Alastair Riddell Space Waltz    Richard O'brien Rocky Horror Picture Show Soundtrack    Skyhook Ego is not a dirty word  

1975 Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel The Best Years of Our Lives, Sailor - Trouble, Alastair Riddell - Space Waltz, David Werner - Whizz Kid, Richard O'Brien - Rocky Horror Picture Show, Tiger Lily - "Monkey Jive" b/w "Ain't Misbehavin'," Skyhooks - Ego is Not a Dirty Word, Jet - Jet








Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel Timeless Flight     doctors of madness late night movies  doctors of madness figures of emancipation      john miles rebel    

1976 Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - Timeless Flight and Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel - Love's A Prima Donna, Sailor - Third Step, Doctors of Madness - Late Night Movies, All Night Brainstorms, Doctors of Madness - Figments of Emancipation, David Werner - Imagination Quota, Roderick Falconer - New Nation, John Miles - Rebel, Supernaut - Supernaut, Skyhooks - Straight in a Gay World

With the so-called punk explosion, the always hyperbolic British music press got Khmer Rouge style and declared it year zero. Glam continued to exist underground and many more fine albums were released, however critically ignored they were, although most of the bands began to transform into something new, in some cases influencing the punk and new wave that were supposed to be reactions against glam. As Horace wrote, "Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus."




sailor checkpoint  roderick falconer victory in rock city  metro   


1977
Sailor - Checkpoint, Roderick Falconer - Victory in Rock City, Max Lazer - "Saints of Rock n' Roll" b/w "Street Queen," Metro - Metro, Jon Miles - Stranger in the City




doctors of madness sons of survivalJapan Adolescent Sex 1978 Japan Obscure Alternatives 1978
John Miles ZaragonSupernaut the Nauts

1978
 Sailor - Hideaway, Doctors of Madness - Sons of Survival, Japan - Adolescent Sex and Obscure Alternatives, Jon Miles - Zaragon, Supernaut - The Nauts, Skyhooks - Guilty Until Proven Insane





David Werner  Flashman    John Miles Mmph

1979
 David Werner - David Werner, Flashman - Flashman, Metro - New Love, Jon Miles - Mmph

       

1980 Sailor - Dressed for Drowning, Cuddly Toys - Guillotine Theatre, Metro - Future Imperfect, Jon Miles - Sympathy, Skyhooks - Hot for the Orient, Coby and Iris Recht with Roger S. Clinton - The Apple Soundtrack






1982
Cuddly Toys - Trials & Losses

The second wave of glam and glam-influenced pop/rock was always malleable but many bands' artistic evolution paralleled the shifting directions of the still active and relevant glam pioneers, Roxy Music and Bowie, incorporating new influences and inspiring many of the new wave/punk/post-punk/goth/urban void and especially the new romantics that followed. For example, Siouxsie and the Banshees covered Roxy Music, Sparks and T Rex, Bauhaus covered T Rex and David Bowie, The Damned played on Marc Bolan's program and the Adverts mingled with Doctors of Madness. Without glam, we probably never would've had bands as wide-ranging as ABC, Adam Ant, The Cure, Duran Duran, Hanoi Rocks, Japan, Joy Division, Klaus Nomi, Magazine, Nina Hagen, Tubeway Army or a host of others. Of course, in the '80s, there probably wouldn't have been anything like glam metal, which helped promote big hair and subsequently contributed to global warming, so it's not all good.


P.S. Here's a video for the unreleased Jobriath track, "Little Dreamer," put together by his half-brother.

...and a Jobriath cover by Def Leppard, just because these artists did mean something to later generations.



The Hitter

Posted by phil blankenship, July 20, 2009 03:39pm | Post a Comment
 


Sony G0633

FCCLA tribute concert this thursday afternoon

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 20, 2009 11:45am | Post a Comment
Last month I posted about the First Congregation Church of Los Angeles and their enormous organs.  A few weeks have passed and I've not found the time to make it out there again, but I'll try this Thursday, July 23rd, as they're having a 10 player tribute to a long attending devotee. I believe that I had the pleasure of speaking to the man a while back; he had been coming for 50+ years and was a player himself. He explained to me and my Pal Joey a little about the layout of the organs and how they worked.  Anyhow, it should be a great concert and I think it's the last one for a few weeks, as the oragans are going to go through their annual tune-up for a while. Below I've included a blow-by-blow account of the behind the scenes action of the FCCLA Great Organs.

FCCLA
540 South Commonwealth Ave. (6th Street)
Los Angeles, CA
90020


BEASTIE BOYS POSTPONE TOUR & ALBUM DUE TO MCA'S CANCER

Posted by Billyjam, July 20, 2009 11:18am | Post a Comment

As officially (and good-humoredly) announced in the above YouTube clip via the group's website posting from earlier this morning, the Beastie Boys' Adam Yauch has been diagnosed with gland cancer and will soon have to undergo treatment. Consequently, the Beastie Boys have had to cancel and postpone upcoming concert dates and also move back their next album, Hot Sauce's, release date. Joining Adam "MCA" Yauch in the surprise video announcement today was fellow Beastie Boy Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz. Upcoming Beastie Boys scheduled dates had included playing Outside Lands, August 30th in the Bay Area and the Hollywood Bowl on September 24th. If you had already bought tix for these or other shows, contact the place of purchase to determine officially whether or not the band is no longer playing.

Watering (Down) the Avant-Garden: Pierre Henry and Sampling

Posted by Charles Reece, July 20, 2009 10:35am | Post a Comment

The recent issue of The Wire caught up with one of the fathers of sampling, musique concrète maestro Pierre Henry. He's been down on the contemporary state of electronic music for awhile. The article begins with a quote from a 1997 interview:

"Today I feel less inspired[.] We're living at a time where everything is controlled, planned and codified and even popular music isn't popular any more, it's imposed upon us."

And he's not any more positive now:

"I think it's a big mistake to call today's music electronic music[.] People do things with computers and samples but it's not the same approach as the way I work, or how Karlheinz Stockhausen worked in his electronic pieces. There is not the same craft, and it's not progress."

Suggesting by implication that the sound collages of El-P, the world creation of Tod Dockstader, Matmos' technological music, or even Björk's omnivorous use of the sounds she finds do not involve a high level of craft just seems wrong-headed to me. The "problem" was better stated in the older interview: codification. When a revolution takes place, there will then follow a prolonged period in which people work under the new order. Not everyone can be Chairman Mao (nothing's more ironic and true in this regard than Maoism -- the revolutionary figure par excellence was used as the ultimate criterion by which the subsequent potential equality of all others was to be judged). Thanks to the revolution of Mssrs. Henry, Stockhausen, Varese and Schaeffer, electronic music has now become a genre, whether Henry likes it or not. Why? Consider Thomas Kuhn's distinction between normal and revolutionary science as they pertain to working within what he called a paradigm:

Mopping-up operations are what engage most scientists throughout their careers. They constitute what I am here calling normal science. [Its] research is directed to the articulation of those phenomena and theories that the paradigm already supplies. [p. 24, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 2nd Edition]

[S]cientific revolutions are here taken to be those non-cumulative developmental episodes in which an older paradigm is replaced in whole or in part by an incompatible new one. [p. 92, ibid.]

The paradigm is that relatively stable period in which scientists have an interpretative matrix through which discoveries are understood. As more and more anomalies are unable to be mapped onto (explained away by) the matrix, a scientific discipline will reach a crisis, at which point a revolutionary interpretation or discovery might be made which, with enough supporters, becomes a paradigm shift.

I'd suggest that something similar happens with genres of music -- or any art, really. A musical discovery, such as musique concrète, won't fit any known genre, or system, of music at first, and might even be irritating noise to the vast majority who encounter it, but once it begins to accrete followers, it's only a matter of time before its methodology is codified, and commercialized. That is, with an art form's acceptance comes the potential for market exploitation. Is there a better example of this than how William S. Burroughs' cut-up method can now be found at any check out lane at a corporate book store in the form of magnetic poetry? (Making literal Laurie Anderson's Burroughs-esque mandate: "You pick up the pieces. You connect the dots.") Through his own revolution, John Cage helped codify noise as music, which has now been turned into a trendy sub-genre of rock and roll -- likewise, Eliane Radique's explorations in drone.

The difference between scientific and musical revolutions is that sciences keep moving and genres begin to eat their own tails. Take Henry's approach to sampling:

"When I borrow material [...] it is to reconcile an existing form with new forms of today. I try to find connections between these older forms with the techniques that interest me now, and the form that emerges from that dialogue becomes the material of a piece."

I happen to believe bringing this formerly avant-garde method to pop culture -- as The Beatles, Zappa and hip hop did -- was an innovation in itself, but with sampling now our present day ontology, all subjects have become de-historicized, present without any attachment to time or place. Henry's historico-moral concern has been left to lawsuits, where borrowing is nothing more than making sure the "original creator" is paid. The "newness" had surely worn off by Fear of a Black Planet. With sampling now one of our fundamental forms, part of our Being, I don't much see how Henry or any artist could re-historicize subjects through the technique. The only "innovation" left to the artist is coming up with a sample no one else has used; the revolution is the order of things.

RIP: A REMIX MANIFESTO'S BRETT GAYLOR AMOEBLOG INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, July 20, 2009 08:00am | Post a Comment

Brett Gaylor
's most engaging documentary, RiP: A Remix Manifesto, screens at the Mezzanine (444 Jessie Street at Mint) in San Francisco at 7pm this Thursday (July 23) as part of the San Francisco Film Society's (SFFS)  SF360 Film+Club series. It will be a fun evening that will also include a live video mashup by London's notorious audio visual remix masters Eclectic Method, plus a DJ set by Adrian and Mysterious D from the popular locally based mashup party Bootie SF. Tickets are $12/SFFS year-round members, and $17/general, available here.

In the new documentary, filmmaker/web-activist Gaylor, who will also be present at Thursday's Mezzanine screening, examines the ever-evolving subject of copyright in this digital age; a hot button topic if ever there were one, and one that has been at the center of many recent high profile lawsuits. For RIP: A Remix Manifesto, which was six years in the making, Gaylor interivews many informed sources from near and far who are all affected somehow by the film's subject matter. Included are Creative Commons founder Lawrence Lessig, Brazil's Minister of Culture Gilberto Gil, and pop culture critic Cory Doctorow. But he turns his cameras' main focus to reigning mash-up and sample-king Girl Talk (or Greg Gillis, as they call him at home) to help get to the heart of the issue of sampling without permission, and the changing status of copyright law in this digital/information age.

Space Is The Place

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 20, 2009 02:00am | Post a Comment
Sun Ra-"Space Is The Place"


The Grateful Dead
- "Space/Morning Dew"



David Bowie- "Space Oddity" (OG Version)


Hawkwind-"Space Is Deep"


Helios Creed
- "Your Spaceman"


Deep Purple
-"Space Truckin'"


A Flock Of Seagulls
- "Space Age Love Song"


8 Ball & MJG -"Space Age Pimpin"

Silence is Golden Earrings ...

Posted by Whitmore, July 19, 2009 11:52pm | Post a Comment

Dear 45 Records room,
 
One more Interstate 5 story: just outside of Sacramento in a fast food joint, I got into a quick conversation with a couple of bikers from the Boozefighters Motorcycle Club, one of the oldest clubs around. They had just come back from the annual Fourth of July weekend gathering in Hollister, the site of the infamous 1947 riot which was the basis for the classic 1951 film The Wild One, starring Marlon Brando and Lee Marvin. (Marvin’s character "Chino" is said to have been based on Wino Willie, founder of the BFMC). But while we were talking I overheard this woman at a table behind me say “He's a goddamned freaking national treasure ... I heard he has, like, a closet filled with mason jars of urine.” Anyway?
 
Here is the song hopelessly stuck in my head, tormenting me as I drove over the Siskiyous Mountain Pass on our way to Ashland, Oregon. And as I drove all night, my hands wet on the wheel, I thought I heard a voice in my head. Oddly enough, at the 4310 ft. summit, around about half past four in the morning, I found myself inexplicably shifting gears ...
 
Anyway, it's pretty late, say hey to the straight edge records and the 200 or so BRMC records we have stacked in the 45 Records Room. One more thing-- give a little peace, love and understanding to the new Elvis Costello Box, and I’ll see you all Monday afternoon.


The Wisdom of Teeth: Part I

Posted by Job O Brother, July 19, 2009 06:24pm | Post a Comment

Yours truly, smiling as big as possible.
(Note the janky wisdom tooth on the bottom right!)

It’s kinda Christmas Eve-y to me today. Why? Because tomorrow I get to go to the oral surgeon and have all four of my wisdom teeth pulled out!

Granted, most people don’t get excited by this prospect, but tomorrow will see me living out a life-long dream of mine: to be put under general anesthesia.

Ever since I was a kid, I thought it was so cool and mysterious that one could be knocked completely unconscious, and longed for the experience. Sadly, and to my continual chagrin, I have lived my life with no real medical emergencies whatsoever. I got my first cavity this year, I’ve never broken a bone – nothing. I did once get appendicitis, but – and to the astonishment of my physician – I somehow “got better” before I got a chance to be cut open.

(I did once cut into my thigh with a chainsaw, but I just put a bandage on it and popped some dog tranquilizers my brother-in-law had on hand.)


So, while I am a little nervous about spending the money to have this procedure done, the actual operation itself is pretty thrilling. Just think – tomorrow, at a little after ten o’clock, my consciousness will be disappeared, and then, about an hour later, I will return, like Lazarus from the grave; a grave with cheap wallpaper, fluorescent lighting and awful smooth jazz piped in, but a resurrection nonetheless!

I will be returning to you tomorrow, post-operation, to blog about the experience. Stay tuned!

Modern Girls

Posted by phil blankenship, July 19, 2009 03:47pm | Post a Comment
 


Paramount Home Video 12564

WHY DON'T ALL MOVIE POSTERS LOOK THIS GOOD?

Posted by Charles Reece, July 18, 2009 07:00pm | Post a Comment
Over at Ain't It Cool News (I hate typing that out), there is a link to this company Mondo that commissions new posters for a lot of mostly bad movies. Why couldn't Hollywood liven up theater lobbies with this kind of stuff? Here's some of the ones that really stood out:



by Alan Hynes, a designer of some great rock posters


by Jeff Kleinsmith, Sub Pop's premier cover artist


by Jacob van Loon, not to be confused with this Jacob Van Loon


by Frank Kozik, famous for his 80s alterna-rock posters and those smoking bunnies


by Brad Klausen, best known as the artist for Pearl Jam, but check out his Tron poster


by Alex Pardee, whose artwork can be seen adorning the new Cage album

WALTER CRONKITE DEAD AT 92

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2009 05:46pm | Post a Comment

Walter Cronkite
, the iconic anchorman, is dead at age 92. Above is one of the former CBS newsman's most famous announcements, breaking news of the shooting death of JFK in November 1963.

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 07:17:09

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2009 01:05pm | Post a Comment
Mista B
Recently ran into Mista B at Amoeba Music San Francisco (as pictured left) as the famed turntablist and member of SF's 4OneFunk crew (with Teeko, B.Cause, Max Kane) was dropping off copies of his tight new independently released CD SonicSoulSpace.

This latest production by  Mista B comes hot on the heels of his collaborative mix CD with fellow 4OneFunk'er B.Cause titled Record Haterz. That ol skool Bay Area rap mix dug deep in the vinyl crates to deliver a flawless mix punctuated by forgotten gems by such bygone Bay rap greats as Totally  Insane, 415 (feat. RIchie RIch), and 11/5.

Mista B will be flying out to New York in a couple of weeks to represent the Bay Area in the 2009 DMC US Finals Battle - the legendary DJ battle where skilled turntablists from all over, usually with endless hours upon hours of practice, converge in a heated battle that only last minutes but whose results go down in the history books forever. This will be Mista B's fifth time to enter a DMC battle.  "I have mixed feelings upon competing again. Usually, DJs compete just once and [then] they're done.  For me, it's not just about the competition but it's about sharing this so called art of turntabilism," he told me. "I feel that DJ battles are one of very few platforms to showcase the art.  So with me, I still practice because I like to work on my craft, my skill if you will.  Specifically beat juggling for me.  I don't do it to be better than the next guy, but to be better than what I was yesterday and to show how graceful sounding this art is" Always pushing himself to improve and to innovate the SF who has been honing his diligently DJ'ng since 1993, told me that.  "I took a class in college and a professor came up with the concept, "sound art." That concept stuck with me since so I like to consider what I do "turntable sound art."  So now I just look for a medium to showcase the art.  So here I am again, competing on a high level versus the country's best DJs, The DMC USA Finals again."

AGENT ORANGE PLAY BLAKES IN BERKELEY TONIGHT

Posted by Billyjam, July 17, 2009 01:46am | Post a Comment

Agent Orange "Voices In The Night" live
All The Rebels Productions
Legendary longtime SoCal punk outfit Agent Orange play Blakes on Telegraph -- a couple of blocks down from Amoeba Music Berkeley -- tonight, Friday July 17th. This highly recommended surf-punk, skate-rock show, put together by longtime Bay Area underground music ambassador/music promoter Peps of All The Rebels Productions, also features the two tight Bay Area bands Jack Killed Jill and Gutwrench.

Tonight's show, which is being co-promoted by Amoeba (look for the Amoeba banner near the stage area tonight), promises to be a rockin', hella fun night for all, with all three bands perfectly complimenting one another's sound. Oakland's Jack Killed Jill effortessly mine that classic Cali punk sound with power-punk guitar progressions and infectious choruses that beg to sung along with. Meantime, San Francisco's Gutwrench, not to be confused with the New Jersey metal band of the same name, also serve up a classic punk sound, albeit a little more on the heavier guitar sound, that pays homage to both classic Cali punk and classic UK punk rock.
Agent Orange
And to top it all off is veteran Orange County act Agent Orange, who decades ago pioneered melding punk rock with their regional traditional surf guitar music (reinterpreting classic surf songs like "Miserlou") and who consequently have been hugely influential within the skate-punk/skate-core scene. And somehow the band have managed to maintain their sharp edge even 30 years since first forming -- as witnessed by the recent live video footage both above and below of the band.

This Week At The New Beverly: July 17 - 23

Posted by phil blankenship, July 17, 2009 12:24am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Our August calendar is now online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday July 17 & 18


A George Cukor/Katharine Hepburn double bill!

The Philadelphia Story (1940)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0032904/
dir. George Cukor, starring Cary Grant, Katharine Hepburn, James Stewart, Ruth Hussey, John Howard
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:15 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Winner of 2 Academy Awards: James Stewart for Best Actor and Donald Ogden Stewart for Best Screenplay. Nominated for 4 other Oscars including Best Actress, Director & Picture!

Cukor and Donald Ogden Stewart's evergreen version of Philip Barry's romantic farce, centreing on a socialite wedding threatened by scandal, is a delight from start to finish, with everyone involved working on peak form. - Time Out Film Guide

BRUNO IST AUS BUT MANY OTHER MOCKUMENTARIES IST IN

Posted by Billyjam, July 16, 2009 10:00pm | Post a Comment
ali g indahouse
So last night I finally got to see the much hyped new Sacha Baron Cohen box-office hit Bruno, which, as a diehard Baron Cohen/Ali G/Borat/Bruno fan from ever since Da Ali G Show first premiered on Channel 4, I was really looking forward to seeing. But, boy, was I let down. To paraphrase Baron Cohen's flamboyantly gay Austrian TV fashionista character, this new movie "ist aus," as in, opposite of "in." And it wasn't that I was shocked in any way, or that I found it offensive to gays, or to redneck Americans, for that matter. I just found it offensive to my sense of humor. I expected a lot more from the great Baron Cohen.

Where was the quick witted Bruno from Da Ali G Show? The one whose hilarious skits included brilliantly manipulating fashion tastemakers into totally contradicting themselves without realizing how ridiculous they looked? Replacing genuine wit and biting satire, post Borat Bruno was merely a barrage of slapstick penis jokes with no real substance or humor to back them up. Even Bruno's encounter with Ron Paul, which could have been the screen magic of such past Ali G interviews with Newt Gingrinch,  Andy Rooney, and Pat Buchanan, fell totally flat in comparision.

Of course, the new Bruno isn't a total waste. The movie offered occasional belly laugh moments such as the Paula Abdul encounter. But my advice is don't rush out to theaters to see it. Wait until it comes out on da ali g showDVD. And speaking of DVDs you should get at Amoeba, I would recommend going back and checking out Da Ali G Show for the far superior Bruno appearances from that missed TV series. Also go back to check out the totally slept on (especially Stateside) pre-Borat 2002 Ali G Indahouse: The Movie about the unlikely rise to fame and political power by the jungle/hip-hop goon from the suburb of Staines that Baron Cohen plays so brilliantly.

"Sea Song" by Robert Wyatt

Posted by Miss Ess, July 16, 2009 06:04pm | Post a Comment

The song that's freaking me out the most these days is "Sea Song" by Robert Wyatt. Its chords and progressions have lumbered along slowly inside of me and utterly taken over my brain. They are unrelentingly existing in there, like waves crashing over and over...

"Sea Song"'s moodiness conjures a dark, star filled night, and sitting by the stormy sea. The otherworldly production and vocals carry the studio version of what could be a rather simple tune into the sublime, and as it unfolds the song sounds as though it is its own creature entirely, unhurriedly lifting out of the ocean, just as the lyrics suggest.

I think it's a perfect song. Please listen to this fairly different live version of "Sea Song" as performed by Wyatt and Friends live in 1974. It's super rockin'. Then, if you don't have Rock Bottom yet, grab it and hear the studio version, which is the best. And if you wanna get really nerdy about it, there's also this fabulous solo performance of "Sea Song" that is highly enjoyable.



The Two Sides of Tim Cohen

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 16, 2009 05:20pm | Post a Comment
Tim Cohen may be familiar tthe two sides of tim coheno you because you recently heard about The Fresh & Onlys, are a fan of the multi-genred Black Fiction, or are familiar with one of his many mysterious side projects.

This newly released record, The Two Sides of Tim Cohen, however, is the first to bear his name. Written and recorded by Tim at his home during the interim between the unfortunate end of Black Fiction and the birth of The Fresh & Onlys, The Two Sides of Tim Cohen is perhaps his most personal work to date. An immensely creative psych-folk opus, it is full of heartfelt love songs, amazing visions, and musings on death and worms. Tim's songs are reminiscent of the catchy, self-produced pop sontwo sides of tim cohengs of RAM-era Paul McCartney crossed with the skewed baritone bellows of Skip Spence and Michael Yonkers. The new album is recommended for fans of Ariel Pink, Panda Bear and Mayo Thompson. It has been released on Secret Seven/Empty Cellar Records.

The Two Sides of Tim Cohen is available at Amoeba now, on vinyl only, and includes an mp3 downloadable version with seven, yes, SEVEN bonus tracks! The release is limited to 250 copies, 100 of which are on white vinyl.

The Wiz Tonight, July 16th @ New Beverly

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 16, 2009 12:50am | Post a Comment
Now that the MJ hoopla is starting to die, ease on down Beverly Blvd to see the young Michael strut his stuff(ing). Seeing The Wiz is one of my earliest memories. I saw it upon its release in '78-- when I was 3!  I was actually a little apprehensive of going to the Wednesday screening, as I had caught this on TV a few years ago and kind of wrote it off. Seeing it back at a moviehouse really made a difference. It's certainly rough around the edges-- odd directing, histrionic Diana moments, extended dance sequences etc.  However, Miss Ross' fellow travellers give stellar performances, the subway sequence is still freaky and MJ was still just an innocent kid-- he hadn't even released Off the Wall yet! Paired up with the cult favorite Return to Oz, it's a double well worth your $7...

New Beverly Cinema

7165 Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036-2548
(323) 938-4038




Prophecy & To Live And Die In L.A. at the New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, July 15, 2009 04:36pm | Post a Comment

Ryan Rotten and Phil Blankenship present MIDNIGHT SHOCK! www.shocktillyoudrop.com


Friday July 17

30th Anniversary!

John Frankenheimer's

Prophecy


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7



Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!



Saturday July 18

William Friedkin's

To Live And Die In L.A.


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7

Actress Darlanne Fluegel will appear IN PERSON, schedule permitting, to discuss the film.

July

July 25 Dangerous Men
An unforgettable suspense & mystery drama.

August
August 1 The Dungeonmaster (1985)
He is the overlord of strange beasts & stolen souls... Empire Pictures mini-classic that is Not On DVD!

IAN CURTIS WOULD'VE APPROVED

Posted by Billyjam, July 15, 2009 01:54pm | Post a Comment
Joy Division
I think Ian Curtis, the late, great lead singer of Joy Division, would have approved of this Caribbean steel band cover of Joy Division's classic song "Transmission." It's by Steel Harmony and was part of Jeremy Deller's Procession from a couple of Sunday afternoons ago in Ian Curtis' hometown of Manchester England. Although, judging by the reaction, or lack thereof, by most of the crowd, I would say that this inspired cover went mostly underappreciated. 

To compare this instrumental steel band version with the original version, below is the band performing it live 33 years ago in Salford, Greater Manchester. "Transmission" was played onstage in the film 24 Hour Party People (available on DVD at Amoeba) in a scene where Curtis suffers an epileptic fit. Orginally a single, the studio version of the song can be found at Amoeba on several Joy Division releases, including the JD collections Substance and The Best of Joy Division. There are also several live versions out there, including one on Joy Division: The Peel Sessions, recorded in 1979. Over the years numerous other artists have covered the song, including UK electropop stars Hot Chip, the Minnesota slowcore group Low, and of course, most recently Steel Harmony.

Way Out West

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 15, 2009 10:55am | Post a Comment









JULY 14th IS BASTILLE DAY

Posted by Billyjam, July 14, 2009 05:00pm | Post a Comment

Today, July 14th, is Bastille Day 2009; the day that marked the storming of the oppressive Bastille prison and the beginning of the French Revolution 220 years ago. Over in France this morning there were parades and tonight they are having firework displays in recognition of the holiday. Actually, this has already taken place since they in France are 9 hours ahead of us here in Cali -- see video above of tonight's fireworks in Paris by the Eiffel Tower.

Over here in the States many folks are also celebrating -- some using it as a good excuse to get their swerve on and sip some French themed drinks. In San Francisco there are quite a few events scheduled. Click this link from the French Consulate for a listing of SF Bastille Day events.

But nothing Stateside comes close to the big event over in Paris, as witnessed from the videos above and also below of last year's Bastille Day, courtesy of the Associated Press, when thousands of people thronged the Champs-Elysee to watch a military parade and celebrate Bastille Day. French President Nicholas Sarkozy is among the many present.


The evolution of the music video, part I (1890s - 1940s)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 14, 2009 02:56pm | Post a Comment
Video and the Radio Star

I think it's safe to say that many, if not most, people seem to assume that music videos began with the initial broadcast of MTV on August 1, 1981. That first video, the Buggles' excruciating "Video Killed the Radio Star," came out in 1979, so what were they singing about? Were the Buggles prophets or were there videos before MTV?


For a long time, there have been musical numbers both in film and on TV. And hundreds of people have probably seen the PBS documentary about Soundies, where Michael Feinstein suggests that "an amazing forty years before MTV made its debut came a revolution in sight and sound." Hacktually, the marriage of music, advertisement and visuals within discrete shorts is almost as old as film itself and this, part one of The evolution of the music video, actually ends with Soundies.  

*cue the Ken Burns music*

1890s - The Kinetoscope

   
William Dickson, a Kinetoscope and a Kinetoscope parlor

William K.L. Dickson, one of the most important pioneers of early film, was working on the Kinetoscope, which played short films matched sound recorded on wax cylinder to film. In what to me is the first music video (filmed around 1894), Dickson plays "Song of the Cabin Boy" on the fiddle whilst two dudes grind suggestively.

Watching the videos required a pair of earbuds and looking through a tiny contraption not unlike the viewer on Spock's 23rd century science station. Constrained by technical limitations to decidedly short durations of around 22 seconds, they were impractical for all musicians (with the exception of maybe Wire and Anal Cunt). Whilst some video purists now suggest that this is the way videos were meant to be seen, at a nickel per view ($1.28 adjusted for inflation), it wasn't appealing enough to make them profitable.



This one isn't that far removed from Kate Bush's "Wuthering Heights."



1920s - Phonofilm & Vitaphone, Ko-Ko Song Car-Tunes, Visual Music and Photophones

  

After a long, enjoyable silence, something resembling the music video appeared, this time on the big screen in 1922 with Lee De Forest's Phonofilms. On April 15, 1923, he showed a program of phonofilms at New York's Rivoli Theater.








   

Warner Bros
got in on the action with their Vitaphone films, beginning in 1926. Recording the music onto discs instead of directly onto the film (as Phonofilm had), they may've represented a step backward in terms of technology. Artistically, however, they moved light years beyond their predecessor's darkened stages or curtain backdrops by situating their subjects in decorated sets.





   

Beginning in 1924, Fleischer Brothers began making Ko-Ko Song Car-Tunes, which were, in addition to being precursors to music videos, were also precursors to karaoke. They were the first films to feature the "follow the bouncing ball" technique. In 1926, Phonofilm declared bankruptcy and the Fleischer's Red Seal followed. After joining forces with Paramount, the Ko-Ko Song Car-Tune was reborn as Screen Songs in 1929.






Visual Music

     

In 1928, Oskar Fischinger created a series of abstract films matched to music known as Studies and released through Electrola. In 1931, Universal purchased the distribution rights to Studie Nr. 5 and it was widely seen in theaters. The Wizard of Friedrichstraße made other movies that are, to me, amazing and seem to have no doubt influenced later musically-minded abstract filmmakers like Norman McLaren and Stan Brakhage.

   

Dudley Murphy had gained some fame in 1924, co-directing (with Fernand Léger) the dadaist film Ballet Mécanique, with Man Ray as cinematographer. In 1929, using RCA's Photophone process, he made St. Louis Blues, a two reel film that added the concept of illustrative narratives to music films and was followed by Duke Ellington's "Black and Tan Fantasy."




1930s - Seeing Sound

 

Mary Ellen Bute
was an experimental filmmaker from Houston who, beginning in 1934, began making what were billed as Seeing Sound. In many ways, they resembled and were no doubt influenced by Fischinger's Visual Music but used science and technology to determine the visuals.






1940s - Soundies

    

In 1939, the Mills Novelty Company invented a visual jukebox they called the Panoram. In 1940, they produced many "soundies" for the machines, which were usually found in bars and the like. Artistically, many had much higher production values than their antecessors in the 1920s.









Auroratone
Auroratones were created by British filmmaker Cecil Stokes for use in the treatment of mental disorders and featured pleasingly proto-psychedelic visuals often accompanying the music of Bing Crosby. 


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The Good, the Bad and the Great One

Posted by Whitmore, July 14, 2009 01:11pm | Post a Comment
Dear 45 Records room,
 
How’s it going? Up until a couple of days ago the weather had been pretty damn nice; mid 70’s, sunny, slight sea breeze ... but a cold front came in, shelving plenty of weekend barbeques. From the edge of this five acre property you can see the whitecaps out on the waves getting ornery. Damned cantankerous Northwest climate!
 
At the local thrift store I found a goldmine -- and I use that term loosely -- of used Jackie Gleason records in mint condition. Jackie Gleason, AKA the Great One, back in the mid 1950’s when his The Honeymooners television show was at the top of its game, was contracted by Capitol Records to arrange and conduct or compose a series of records with a relaxing-romantic-late night vibe. I suspect he simply just sold his name to Capitol and hung out at the studio sessions tippling with the musicians. The best part of this “Music For” series was the packaging. The art work always stood out. One cover in particular, Lonesome Echo, was created by Salvador Dali. But this thrift store’s stash of LP’s are the more “desirable” covers, pun intended. Anyway, I found about eight Gleason albums, minty jackets all, but minus the vinyl! These album jackets are perfect, lust filled portraits of silky and laced up vixens -- femme fatales draped over sofas and beds and floors with their come hither mouths and eyes whispering “another martini, lover boy?” What I found includes Music Martinis and Memories, Music for Lovers Only, Aphrodesia, Love Embers and Flame and of course Music to Make you Misty; all the albums ready for framing and decking out your mad bachelor pad dad!
 
Well, 45’s Record Room, I’ll talk to you later. Tuck in all the Northern Soul records for me, give the R&B section a kiss goodnight and tell the Ska records that I haven’t forgotten about them, I have a little gift to give them when I get back.

SLAYER MADE THRASH METAL MAYHEM IN CALI OVER WEEKEND

Posted by Billyjam, July 14, 2009 10:27am | Post a Comment

Over the weekend California got into classic thrash metal mode with Slayer, who played the big Mayhem Festival which opened on Friday in Marysville (Sacramento area), set up stage at the Shoreline Amphitheater in Mountain View (Bay Area) on Saturday and played in San Bernardino at the slayerSan Manuel Amphitheater last night. Above and below is some fan video footage of the SoCal metal legends, who formed 28 years ago, performing on the opening night of the tour, doing the songs "Jihad" (above) and "War Ensemble" (below).

This second year of the traveling Mayhem festival also includes Marilyn Manson, Killswitch Engage, Bullet For My Valentine (BFMV) and, for a few select upcoming dates in place of BFMV, Mushroomhead. Also on the tour are the bands Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Job For A Cowboy, The Black Dahlia Murder, Whitechapel, Trivium, All That Remains, and God Forbid. On each date of the tour a different band that won the Jägermeister Battle of the Bands contest performs, including Skinlab, who played the first night, Corrupt Absolute, who played Shoreline, and Madlife, who played SoCal last night.
The Mayhem US tour continues through the middle of next month with stops in all the major urban areas with the final date in Dallas, TX on August 15th. More Mayhem info here.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 07/17/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 13, 2009 03:49pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:


Lory D

PLISSKEN 12"
SD01

Legendary techno head LORY D drops "BANK ROBBERY," an interpretation of the track from "ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK" that is brooding and otherwordly. Flip it for "DISSO BASS," made for the dancefloor with exploding synths and archetypal bass lines. Mastered by REDSHAPE.

Igor
LE MASSACRE DU TYMPAN 12"
IGOR001 

A highly explosive track that reinterprets STRAVINSKY's classic "SACRE DU PRINTEMPS." Sounds like a forgotten techno classic from SUBURBAN KNIGHT who was recording with LAURENT GARNIER with HENRICK SCHWARZ as the studio engineer. Goosebumps on this one-sided 12".
 

Autokratz ALWAYS MORE 12" KITSUNE091

Beatconductor BRAND NEW SECONDHAND 12" SPICY007

(In which an angel visits Amoeba Music Hollywood.)

Posted by Job O Brother, July 13, 2009 02:33pm | Post a Comment

Little Jimmy looking big

Uh, did I mention that, a couple weeks ago, Little Jimmy Scott came into the jazz room at Amoeba Music Hollywood? I used up a whole box of tissue, my mind was so blown – and I’m not easily star-struck. Most of the people I’d like to meet are dead (a quality I admire in a person). Never have I been as giddy and star-struck as I was at meeting Jimmy Scott. I cried. I actually cried! Like I was a seventeen-year-old girl at a Beatles concert in ’64. Okay, I didn’t grab the sides of my face and scream – not externally, anyway.


He was sweet like an angel descending on the city for a day to offer a glimpse of light unsoiled by our planet’s spiritual smog. His voice was unmistakable, his smile generous, and he patiently listened to all our gushing with the grace you’d expect from your favorite Kindergarten teacher. The fact that he was wheelchair-bound only enhanced the sense that he was visiting royalty, forever receiving people at his throne.

Poor health has made his already diminutive body more frail, and the stiffness in his hands made for an other-worldly contrast to his skin, which was soft and warm like a newborn infant.

He was flanked by a small film crew from Germany who were shooting a documentary on the making of his next album which, they reported, would be of the blues genre. They were excited that, in the employees of Amoeba, they finally found some young people who not only knew who Jimmy Scott was, but were fans. One of them bullied my fellow co-worker, Lucas, and I into being interviewed for their documentary, despite my emphatic explanation that I was too shy for interviews and anyway, English was my sixteenth language. (I acquiesced after they called my bluff and offered to allow me to answer questions in my native Ket.)

I don’t remember much of what Lucas and I said, but it was something along the lines of, “Boo boo gah gah I like orange,” – something to that effect.

Many of you hipsters will recognize Jimmy Scott’s voice as the “woman who sings ‘Sycamore Trees’ on the soundtrack for the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.”


Thinking that Jimmy’s voice belongs to a woman is a common mistake. The unique and marvelous timbre of his pipes is in part due to his being born with Kallmann syndrome. The other reason is that God kissed him with magic when he was a baby. I forget the scientific term for that.

Jimmy’s story is noteworthy (no pun intended). I recommend seeing the 2002 documentary Jimmy Scott: If You Only Knew. [This link will lead you to an interview with Jimmy conducted by NPR recorded  to promote the film. It's a swell listen on its own.] Beyond that, do try listening to his music. It’s like a luxurious bubble-bath for your soul, any time.

Money Changes Everything, Pt.2

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 13, 2009 02:08am | Post a Comment



KMFDM-Money



Everything But The Girl- Love Not Money



Donna Summer- She Works Hard For The Money



The Dream
- Love vs. Money



Dire Straits - Money For Nothing



Dennis Brown- Money In My Pocket



Delroy Wilson
- Money


Conflict
- Turning Rebellion Into Money



Eric Clapton - Money And Cigarettes



The Barkays
- Money Talks



AMG - Bitch Betta Have My Money
 

Amoeba Hollywood World Music Chart July 1st-12th

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 13, 2009 01:42am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Hollywood World Music Chart July 1st-12th

1. Aventura- The Last
2. Los Amigos Invisible- Commercial
3. V/A- Panama! Vol. 2
4. Manu Chao- Clandestino
5. V/A- Nigeria Special: Modern Highlife, Afro-Sounds and Nigerian Blues
6. Federico Aubele- Amatoria
7. V/A- Nigeria Disco Funk Special
8. V/A Rudo Y Cursi Soundtrack
9. Oumou Sangare- Seya
10. Wisin & Yandel- La Revolucion

The Amoeba World Music charts for July 1st- 12th shows that if it isn’t Latino, it’s Africano. With the exception of Manu Chao, the rest of the releases come from either Latin America or the continent of Africa. Coming in at #1, as expected, was Aventuras The Last, which has slowed down just a tad since its initial release. Los Amigos Invisibles comes in at number two, followed by yet another Soundway compilation, Panama! Vol. 2. In fact, the Soundway label not only has three releases in our top ten, but several releases in our top twenty-five. The Panama! Vol. 2 compilation ranks up there with the excellent Colombia & Nigeria Special Series. This comp focuses on the post-Panama Canal Caribbean, Afro-American and South American influences on Panama. At this point I have to say it’s better and a bit deeper than Vol.1.

The number six slot goes to the Argentine folk-electro Federico Aubele and number eight to the the Rudo Y Cursi soundtrack. I finally got to check out the movie after many people I respect gave it a poor review. I thought it was good, but noticed that the Spanish to English translation was spotty at best. If one had to rely on subtitles for the movie, I could understand why the movie was underappreciated.

At number nine is Oumou Sangare, another great voice from the Mali region. This is her first album in quite some time. I have been looking forward to seeing her perform one day in Los Angeles, but, as with most African and Latin American artists, visas are hard to come by these days, although it’s not like the Bush administration post 9-11 days, during which they flat-out refused to issue visas to most non-European artists. Now, they will eventually grant the visas, but it takes so long to grant them that most artists have to cancel their tours that they have planned in the U.S. The latest victims of the new administration have been Orchestra Baobab from Senegal and Silvio Rodriguez from Cuba. Silvio was invited to play Pete Seeger’s 90th Birthday celebration in May, only to be granted the visa way too late to be part of it. Orchestra Baobab was to perform at the Santa Monica Pier, an event that Amoeba had a booth at, but it was also cancelled. Music has no borders, but unfortunately, nations do.

Hot new releases, ready to enter the charts:

V/A- ANALOG AFRICA No.5 - Legends Of Benin
V/A- Black Rio 2
V/A- The World Is Shaking: Cubanismo From The Congo, 1954-55
Chico Sonido- S/T
Bomba Estereo- Blow Up
 

Silence is Golden?

Posted by Whitmore, July 12, 2009 03:16pm | Post a Comment
Dear 45s Record room,
 
I just finished driving due north to beautiful Vashon Island off the coast of Seattle; 1200 miles of dodging Highway Patrol speed traps, over-thinking routes and stuck in hyper caffeine overdrive listening to crazy-ass tirades from loony-right-wingnut talk radio. I suspect the elitist-socialist-coast-hugging-Hollywood-sissy-leftist-yoga flexing-public radio-wingnut they’re talking about is me, except I’m just a record geek on vacation driving a Ford mini-van with my wife and kid on that silvery ribbon of highway. By the way, gas wasn’t terribly overpriced anywhere on the road.
 
We spent a couple of days at the mouth of the Russian River just north of the Bay Area; insanely gorgeous and weirdly quiet. For most of us, spending a night in John’s cabin was probably a treat. Up there on the Russian River surrounded by big blue chunks, there is no noise, just pure unadulterated silence. I woke one morning very suspicious of silence. Is silence golden? Hell, I think silence is more often than not iron pyrite. Confucius said “Silence is the true friend that never betrays.” Well, I’m always a little dubious. In Buddhism silence and allowing the mind to become silent can help lead to spiritual enlightenment. Unfortunately I doubt I’ll ever know. My hearing is shot and if the high pitch ringing in my ears doesn’t drive me mad, all the noise I use to cover my tinnitus every single frigging day will. I’d like to blame someone other than myself for this predicament; it is the true blue American, Fourth of July, consecrated right to deny personal responsibility. Could I blame some of the 5000 different bands I did sound for in my years as a live engineer? I was raised in the Catholic Church-- maybe the blame should be directed at god? Then again, what’s that going to accomplish? I’m pretty sure by the sixth chapter of the first book in the bible god was ready to kill off everybody; I doubt my tinnitus could qualify as either a concern of the almighty or the act of a vengeful god ... too simple a scheme. However, according to talk radio rationale, I could and should blame Obama, Pelosi, or Letterman and Franken or a least my college education for all my problems.
 
Anyway, I’ll write you again later, don’t forget to feed the new psychedelic record box, and take out the thrash records, thanks. Oh, and send my regards to the pop vocals clutter. PS: here are a couple of pix from along the way and an old song. One more thing, according to the great mime Marcel Marceau, “Music and silence combine strongly because music is done with silence, and silence is full of music.” I presume he wrote that down.

Bob Mitchell 1912 - 2009

Posted by Whitmore, July 12, 2009 02:36pm | Post a Comment


The original ballpark organist for Dodger Stadium and the last surviving working keyboard accompanist from the silent-film era, Bob Mitchell, has died. He was 96.

The native Angelino, born in Sierra Madre in 1912, died this past week from congestive heart failure at Hancock Park Rehabilitation Center in Los Angeles.
 
From the first Dodger game played at the Chavez Ravine Stadium in 1962 until 1966, Mitchell was the keyboardist on the Wurlitzer double-keyboard organ with a 25-note bass pedal board. Up until that time he was best known as founder of the Robert Mitchell Boys Choir and its director for over 60 years. They appeared in more than 100 motion pictures, starting with 1936’s That Girl from Paris. Other films included the classics Going My Way starring Bing Crosby from 1944 where they sang “Ave Maria” and 1947’s The Bishop’s Wife. The choir was also documented in the 1941 Academy Award nominated short Forty Boys and a Song. Over the years more than 600 kids between the ages of about 8 and 16 performed in the Mitchell choir. Alumni include members of the Modernaires, the Lettermen, and the Sandpipers.

In 1924 at the age of 12, Mitchell began playing organ at the old Strand Theater in Pasadena, improvising soundtracks to silent movies. But with the advent of talkies and The Jazz Singer in 1927, Mitchell's first career as a silent-film accompanist was about over by the time he was 16. 65 years later, in 1992, he once again sat at the organ accompanying films at LA’s Silent Movie Theatre on Fairfax Avenue. His last public performance was this past May when he opened the Last Remaining Seats film series at the Orpheum Theatre in downtown LA.
 
Bob Mitchell began taking piano lessons at four years of age. He attended the New York College of Music before returning to Los Angeles in 1934; eventually he graduated from what is now Cal State L.A. and Trinity College in London. During the Second World War Mitchell served in the Navy and played keyboards for the Armed Forces Radio Orchestra under the direction of Meredith Willson, who later wrote The Music Man.

And for all you record collectors out there of exotic organ music, in 1963 Mitchell released a record called Baseball's Best, featuring the Dodger Stadium Wurlitzer organ.

Bob Mitchell will be buried at Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

SUBWAY ART PHOTOGRAPER HENRY CHALFANT INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, July 11, 2009 04:45pm | Post a Comment
Subway Art
Subway Art
-- the legendary graffiti art book by Henry Chalfant and Martha Cooper -- has just recently been republished in a nice big coffee table hard cover version appropriately titled Subway Art: 25th Anniversary Edition. The book has never been out of print since its initial 1984 publication but this new anniversary edition is just jaw-droppingly amazing and a must-have for any graffiti fan.

Its much larger scale and new dimensions of 17" by 13" full-color spreads allow the crispy clear photos to fully come to life in their bright, beautiful colors and hence make them so much easier to fully appreciate.

The new edition of Subway Art also offers numerous never-before-seen photos from that late 70's / early 80's era of New York City when Cooper and Chalfant were documenting this vibrant and rampant illegal public transit art form; one that would be gone by the end of the decade in which the book was first published. But over the years Subway Art has taken on life of its own and the influential book has gone on to sell a staggering half a million copies.

I recently had the opportunity to sit down and talk with Henry Chalfant about this influential art book. A Stanford graduate who was first a sculptor, Chalfant has lived in New York City for many years and is now nearing 70. He is equally known in graffiti circles for his documentation of the art form via the book Spraycan Art which he co-authored with James Prigoff, and for Style Wars, the historic PBS documentary on New York graffiti that he co-produced with Tony Silver. Chalfant's work can be found in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. A few years ago he directed the excellent Latin and hip-hop themed documentary about the South Bronx, From Mambo to Hip Hop: A South Bronx Tale, that aired on PBS stations in 2006.

12 inch die cuts

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 11, 2009 12:35pm | Post a Comment

The art of the 12" company sleeve can really be quite entertaining. The middle sleeve above is not a Big Beat sleeve-- does anyone out there know what company made these? The Alicia Bridges and Travolta sleeves below are not company sleeves, but are good examples of the disco die cut promotional sleeve popular in the early years of the 12". Experiments with the 12" single format began in 1974 and by 1975 a decent amount of promo 12"s had been released. Within a couple of years the 12" single would become the format of choice for promoting dance oriented tunes. By the 80's, 12" records were pressed for most every mainstream hit, dance oriented or not. Springsteen w/  "dub version" b-sides, etc.





Above we have a couple of die cut sleeves used to market LPs, not 12"s. Below there's a Russian example. This sleeve may have been used for either LPs or 12"s, but this particular release is a disco-ish LP.

Italian Grindhouse @ Egyptian Theatre

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 10, 2009 07:15pm | Post a Comment
The Egyptian is hosting a short Italian Grindhouse festival these next 7 days! Yesterday featured the legendary Cemetary Man as well as Argento's Opera. Fortunately for those that missed this double, both are available at Amoeba. Tonight the Cinematheque is showing a Carroll Baker double with Paranoia (Orgasmo) & A Quiet Place to Kill (A Drug Called Helen). Over the next week they'll cover sword and sandal territory, spaghetti westerns, psychedellic giallo & italo-crime. Films featuring Edwige Fenech, John Cassavetes, Klaus Kinski, Steve Reeves, Christopher Lee & many more favorites. Many not on DVD!

Compete Calendar here.

Egyptian Theatre
6712 Hollywood Blvd. (@ Las Palmas)







AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP (VIDEO VERSION): 07:10:09

Posted by Billyjam, July 10, 2009 10:50am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music San Fra
Cagencisco Hip-Hop Top Five: 07:10:09 (by Luis, hip-hop buyer)

1) Cage Depart From Me (Def Jux)

2) Alchemist Chemical Warfare (KOCH)

3) J-Dilla Dillanthology 2: Dilla's Remixes for Various Artists Remixes (Rapster)

4) Chali 2na Fish Outta Water (Decon)

5) Notes To Self A Shot In The Dark (BBE)

Single of the week: 

Kid Cudi
"Make Her Say" (Universal/Motown)

Thanks to Luis (as seen in YouTube clip above), the hip-hop buyer at Amoeba Music, San Francisco, for this week's top five best selling new hip-hop CDs, plus the single of the week. Cage, this week's number one, even surpasses his last innovative outing Hell's Winter from four years ago. This new Def Jux album is bound to break the gifted New York progressive rap artist onto the mainstream. Just check out the video below for the new Cage album track "I Never Knew You." The song and accompanying video (directed by Shia Labeouf) have the same power and engaging urgency that Nirvana's breakout single/video "Smells Like Teen Spirit" did back in the early nineties. Coincidentally, Cage's notoriously troubled past, including mental health problems and drug abuse, draw some parallels to Kurt Cobain. Although thankfully it seems that Cage has gotten his shit chali 2na fish outta watertogether as far as the hard drugs are concerned, so hopefully he can stay mentally healthy & focused on his art and continue to make great albums like Depart From Me.

CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON IN 3-D @ PARAMOUNT TONIGHT

Posted by Billyjam, July 10, 2009 07:44am | Post a Comment

Despite the effortless and seemingly endless dissemination of information via all the new tools of this digital age (Twitter,  text messages, Facebook, blogs, emails, etc.), I still value learning about stuff via such creature from the black lagoonold school ways as simply reading about it in the paper. That's how I found out about the screening of the classic monster movie Creature From The Black Lagoon at the Paramount Theater in Oakland tonight. An ad for the 3-D screening was on the back page of this week's Bay Guardian immediately below an ad for Amoeba Music.
 
In this greatest of movie monster flicks, directed by Jack Arnold, the plot goes as such: Gill man Dr. David Reed and his girlfriend Kay Lawrence (Richard Carlson and Julia Adams) join a scientific expedition into the Amazon's "Black Lagoon" to investigate an alleged missing link between man and fish. The 1954 film offered pioneering underwater photography, with cinematographer Charles Welbourne pushing the envelope and dispensing of the standard (up til then) static camera shots by using a portable moving camera that followed the film's swimmers. This classic 1950s film went on to inspire two sequels: Revenge of the Creature and The Creature Walks Among Us, although neither were as popular as the original.
 
Creature From The Black Lagoon, which is available on DVD but not in 3-D (look for it at Amoeba Music) is best seen on the big screen and enjoyed in glorious 3-D. At tonight's screening in downtown Oakland's wonderfully preserved art deco Paramount, 3-D glasses will be provided as you enter the theater. And the recession-friendly price of only $5 (including Paramount Classic Movie Nights cartoon, classic newsreel, and trailers before the main feature begins) is the best value you will find for your weekend night out, not to mention the art deco architecture masterpiece that you also get to enjoy. Parmount Classic Movie nights also the live Wurltizer organ serenade plus a raffle - chance to win free prizes.

Paramount Movie Classics' screening of Creature From The Black Lagoon is at the Paramount Theater @ 2025 Broadway, downtown Oakland at 8pm tonight, Friday July 10th, with doors opening at 7pm. Box office opens at 6pm.

This Week At The New Beverly: July 10 - July 16

Posted by phil blankenship, July 9, 2009 11:01pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

Grindhouse Tribute to Don Edmonds, Fellini's La Dolce Vita & a trip to Oz with Michael Jackson in The Wiz & Fairuza Balk in Return To Oz!

The July calendar is online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday July 10 & 11


Brian Quinn and Eric Caidin with Grindhouse Releasing present
The Grindhouse Film Festival


ILSA Fest and Don Edmonds Memorial

Triple Feature! All Tickets $10
One tickets admits you to all three films.

Greenland --> Naalakkersuisut - And Inuit cinema and music

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 9, 2009 10:22pm | Post a Comment


Though Greenland has been home-ruled since 1979, on June 21, 2009, the Danish government made steps toward granting Greenland full independence. In a 2008 referendum, 76% of the 58,000 residents of the sparsely populated island voted for self-rule and the Danish government has been handing over control of services to the local government and making symbolic changes, like changing the official language to Kalaallisut (the Inuit language of most Greenlanders) and renaming the country Naalakkersuisut.


Every schoolchild has at least a vague awareness of Greenland, that conspicuously white island (decidedly not green) near the top of most globes. According to Eiríks saga rauða (the saga of Eric the Red) and Íslendingabók (the book of Icelanders), the name was chosen to attract settlement by promoting Greenland as an attractive place to live.


Although part of the North American Tectonic plate, Eurocentric models of North American discovery either credit Columbus or Bjarni Herjólfsson with discovering the New World when they sighted the Caribbean and Canada, respectively. As Wikipedia's entry on the Norwegian explorer states, "Bjarni is believed to be the first European to see North America," which he did in the summer of 986 on the way to visit his parents in Greenland, and island which is itself part of North America. So Europeans (including Herjólfsson’s parents) had already "discovered" Greenland, although many before have quite reasonably questioned one's ability to discover something already known for thousands of years to many people.

 

Although Naalakkersuisut is economically and geographically closer to the Inuit state of Nunavut (separated only by the narrow Nares Strait), it is nonetheless still viewed by many as a remote corner of Europe. Now, with moves toward independence and changes that reflect its Inuit majority, that all may begin to change.

ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE ISLAND



The Saqqaq Culture (2500 BCE to 800 BCE) and the Independence I Culture (2400 BCE to 1300 BCE)

The story of Naalakkersuisut’s settlement involves successive waves of people who came and went until the arrival of the proto-Inuit Thule people, who’ve been there ever since. The first inhabitants, referred to as the Saqqaq Culture, are mostly known of due to the discovery of their stone tools and harpoon heads and other traces of their settlement in the western part of the country. No one knows why they disappeared, but conditions on Naalakkersuisut have always been pretty severe, with most of the island an uninhabited arctic desert, and it's believed that it got colder around the time of their disappearance. The Saqqaq culture was joined by the Independence I culture which existed in the northeast part of the country. Though they arrived later than the Saqqaq Culture, they disappeared before them too, leaving behind large mammal bones, walrus bone artifacts and other remnants of their settlements.

The Independence II & Dorset Culture(s) (800 BCE-1500AD)



The Greenlandic Dorset came as the Saqqaq culture was disappearing and its people lived in a much more extensive coastal territory, building long-houses and hunting with quartz blades. Although historically viewed as separate from the intermediate Independence II Culture in the north, recent finds have suggested a greater continuity. The Dorset Culture were probably one of possibly several peoples referred to by the Vikings as the Skraelings. The Vikings thought of the Skraelings as separate from humans and more like trolls and described them as ill-favored little people who used whale teeth and sharp stone tools, who had ugly hair, large eyes and were broad in the cheeks. Nonetheless, it was the Skraelings (although possibly a different people) who summarily destroyed the Vikings' colonies in Vinland.

The Norse (985 AD-1408AD)



When the Norse arrived in Naalakkersuisut, the once extensive Dorset people had already abandoned the southern portion of their realm and the Vikings settled there. Unlike the previous inhabitants, the Vikings weren't at all self-sufficient and relied on trading local products with Europe in exchange for timber, iron and other goods. During the Little Ice Age, the Vikings lost contact with Europe. When contact was reestablished, the Vikings were gone.

The Thule & Inuit (1200 AD-present)


The proto-Inuit Thule Culture first arose in Alaska around 1000 AD. Employing superior technology (like dog-drawn sleds) and bow & arrows, they quickly expanded over the next two centuries, arriving in Naalakkersuisut around 1200. At apparent odds with the Viking accounts of the Dorset Culture, the Thule described the the Sivullirmiut (first inhabitants) as giants… albeit giants that were easily driven out of their homeland by the Thule.
 
GREENLANDIC MUSIC

Greenlandic music can generally be divided into two camps, Danish and Inuit. The largest label is the tiny ULO in tiny Sisimiut, which releases rock, pop, rap and traditional Inuit music. Inuit Greenlandic traditional music, not surprisingly, shares many characteristics with their Inuit cousins to the west in Nunavut and Alaska and is comprised of three main genres.

Drum Dances


Drumdances are a frequently competitive form of music in which, to the beat of a bear bladder drum, contestants insult and make fun of one another, trying to get bigger laughs than the opponent out of the audience. Other times drumdances are performed solo by shamen.

Piseq

Piseq are more along the lines of most folk music, ancient songs passed down through the centuries and told with a more personal bent.

Katajjaq


In Naalakkersuisut, throat-singing is done only by females, much as in the tradition of the distantly-related Ainu of Japan and Sakhalin. The music is a form of game in which two competitors try to elicit laughter by imitating animal noises and other techniques.

  Susan Aglukark   Inuit - fifty-five historical recordings

Inuit Music on CD

The filing of Inuit music at the Hollywood Amoeba perhaps reflects some of the confusion and lack of awareness about these Native American peoples and it can be hard to find. Tanya Tagaq Gillis, an Inuk singer from Ikaluktuutiak, Nunavut, has her music filed in the Icelandic section (although Inuit have no historical presence there). On the other hand, fellow Inuk singer Susan Aglukark is filed in folk. The Greenland section (not yet re-named Naalakkersuisut) is located within the larger section of Europe, despite all Inuit regions being in North America. At the time of writing, there were only two CDs filed in the Greenland section. One was a collection a collection of Evenk music. Evenkia, for the record, is a nation in North Asia. The other CD is called Inuit -- Fifty-Five Historical Recordings and features recordings from wax cylinder's dawn in 1905 all the way up to 1987. It provides a fascinating listen and even the earliest recordings have surprisingly good sound quality.
CINEMA OF NAALAKKERSUISUT

Although not exactly Bollywood, there have been several films made and/or filmed in Naalakkersuisut over the years, including:
 
   

S.O.S. Isberg
(1933), Nâlagkersuissut okarput tássagôk (1973), Narsaq - ung by i Grønland (1979), Uuttoq - Kaali på sælfangst (1985), Qaamarngup uummataa (1998), Godnat - Sinilluarit (1999) and Le Voyage d'Inuk (2009).

 
OTHER INUIT FILMS
 
Nunavut

Nunavut has produced, on the whole, more widley accessible films and better known Inuit films including:
 
         

Nanook of the North
(1922), The White Dawn (1974), Atanarjuat (2001), The Snow Walker (2003), The Journals of Knud Rasmussen (2006), Ce qu'il faut pour vivre (2008) and Le jour avant le lendemain (2008).
 

Inuit Alaska

In the Alaskan Inuit homeland, several films have focused largely on Inuit, including:

     
 
Igloo (1932), Eskimo (1933), Red Snow (1952), Snow Bear (1970), Never Cry Wolf (1983) and On Deadly Ground (1994), Sikumi (2008)
 

Eskiface

If you’re in the mood for less authentic representations of Inuit, you could check out these films in which mostly white and Asian actors (or cartoon characters) portray Inuk characters:
 
   
    

Little Pal (1915), Justice of the Far North (1925), Frozen Justice (1929), Sin Sister (1929), Man of Two Worlds (1934), Girl from God’s Country (1940), The Savage Innocents (1959), Legend of Amaluk (1971), Electric Eskimo (1979), Seabert -- The Adventure Begins (1987), Map of the Human Heart (1993), Smilla’s Sense of Snow (1996), Mama, Do You Love Me? (1999), Inuk (2001), Far North (2007), Shadow of the Wolf (1992) and North Star (1996).

There are also several documentaries about Inuit throughout their various homelands, including:
 
Edge of Ice: Polar Ecosystem and Inuit Culture, The Great North, Baked Alaska, Arctic Dreamer: The Lonely Quest of Vilhjalmur Stefansson, The Complete Alaska, Grønland, In the Footsteps of the Inuit: The History of Nunavik, Mother, The Living Edens: Arctic Oasis -- Canada's Southhampton Island, The Year of the Hunter: The Story of Nanook, Knud, If the Weather Permits, Seeking the Way: The Hockey Journey of the Tootoo Brothers, Broken Promises: The High Arctic Relocation, Inuuvunga, The Prize of the Pole and The Ultimate Kings of Thule.

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First hand Report: The Michael Jackson Memorial

Posted by Amoebite, July 9, 2009 02:13pm | Post a Comment
michael jackson wall

How was it?

It was good; sad, but it was great. I cried a lot. A LOT a lot. But it was great.

That's about all I can say when people ask how the Michael Jackson memorial went. I can't find the right words. I can't do it justice. All I can say is that I was very fortunate, I miss MJ, and I wish I could return the michael jacksonfavor to the Jackson family.

Being at the Staples Center Tuesday morning during the Michael Jackson memorial was unreal. My heart was consistently inconsistent -- skipping beats, then beating too fast in an attempt to catch up. I repeatedly caught myself staring at the people around me. Such an eclectic group of people, with only one common denominator: Michael Jackson. The same man responsible for my constant dancing, the same man that made me want to create things that weren't real, the same man that made me want to care about the world and people just a little bit more, and make it a better place as much as I can. Every single person there saw something in the same man. It truly is amazing, and he really is the greatest entertainer that ever lived, in the words of Berry Gordy. Music is THAT powerful, and when someone as passionate as Michael Jackson performs, it's unparalleled, and that is immediately recognized.

Tuesday morning started off as a chilly, cloudy, dark Los Angeles morning. The line of Michael fans wrapped through downtown and all had one common interest: paying respect. Thousands of fans gathered to honor their idol, hundreds of police officers gathered to maintain the crowds, hundreds of Staples Center employees got together to ensure everyone got the chance to participate in the tribute, news anchors and camera crews converged to document it, and dozens of his friends and family united in one place. Within an hour and a half of receiving Michael Jackson memorial 'programs', the ceremony michael jackson's casketbegan with the amazing Smokey Robinson followed by a very awkward 8 minutes of silence. It was during that time that I looked at the stage that I had been staring at for the past hour and finally realized that the white rug lined with brilliant flowers was for none other than the casket, and within seconds of figuring it out, it became real, and Michael Jackson's casket was in front of my eyes, in front of the world's eyes. I lost it. I obviously knew going in that it was a memorial, but I didn't expect to lose it like I did. It was a different sorrow than what I had been feeling for the 12 days prior; it was real. This truly was it, there was no middle man, no media to tell me that MJ isn't here. I could see it, and that was a huge truth to wrap my head around.

out this week 6/30 & 7/7...gossip...bjork...wilco...moby...bowerbirds...

Posted by Brad Schelden, July 9, 2009 01:39pm | Post a Comment

Sometimes I think that I might throw the word love around too much... I do tend to fall in love with music and sometimes don't know how else to describe it. But I worry that it might take away some of the value of the word. How do I describe an album that I love more than any other if I have already claimed to love dozens of albums this year already? I might need to just start describing albums as pretty good. I do seem to use this phrase a lot when describing my feelings of certain situations, but I really actually mean pretty great when I say pretty good. So when I say love or great, I really do mean it. When an album like this new album by The Gossip comes around I really wish I had a new word to describe it. I do love it...but I really, really love it. I was a bit worried that I might just sort of like it. How could they follow up the brilliance of the last album Standing in the Way of Control? There was just no way. Their albums have been getting better and better but I was worried they had just gthe gossip music for menotten as good as they were going to get. This new album also marks their debut on a major label. They have gotten to be huge stars in England with the last album and were signed. I was worried they were maybe too busy playing big festival shows and doing big fancy photo shoots, too busy to concentrate on making another brilliant album. But I really had no reason to be worried. I had heard rumours that the new album was going to be great, and it most certainly is. Music for Men was released last week digitally and as an import. We will have to wait for the domestic CD and LP until later in the year, but I could not wait for this one. I had to pick up the import. I had to hold something in my hands. I wanted to look through the liner notes as I listened to the album for the first time. I wanted to own the album! You know, like we all used to do.

There is no mistaking the voice of Beth Ditto. That brilliant, strong, fascinating voice. I can't get enough of it. I fell in love with it the first time I heard it -- and I really mean it. Seeing them live is an essential part of falling in love with The Gossip. I saw them live a couple times in Olympia for Ladyfest, once at one of the main venues for the shows, and it was for sure one of the highlights, but I also got to see them play in somebody's basement the night before. Not sure how I ended up there but I am glad that I did. This was right as they were starting to make an impact and get more popular. I already really liked the albums but after that I knew I would be a fan for life. Seeing them live in San Francisco over the next couple of years just made me fall deeper in love. It is hard to explain the energy they have on stage. They just transform the songs to something different when they are played live. And it is really hard to not dance when you see them live. The new album is full of all the catchy songs that I have come to expect from them, but the lyrics are also fantastic! Another reason to buy the actual album is to be able to read the lyrics. Ditto's lyrics are often as powerful as her voice. The first single is "Heavy Cross." I will post the video for you below so you can check out the brilliance in case you are still unfamiliar. Every song on this album is worth your time. "Love Long Distance" is one of my favorites. So is "Pop Goes the World" and "Four Letter Word," but it is really silly trying to figure out my favorite songs on this album because it changes every time I listen to it. And seriously, every song is fantastic. Hopefully they will get over to Los Angeles very soon. They are playing a bunch of European shows the next couple of months, which makes sense, since the album is out there and not here. I know we sometimes don't want our favorite bands to get too big -- we want to keep them all to ourselves -- but The Gossip deserves all the succes they have gotten. They have been around a while and worked hard for it. And I really do want everyone to know about them. I want everyone to love them as much as I do. They are just plain fantastic and there is no getting around it. See them live! If you don't fall in love with the albums you will most certainly fall in love with their live performances. Beth Ditto is like no other.

Check out the video for "Heavy Cross" by Gossip from the new album Music For Men...



also out 6/30...






This Is Our Time by The Big Pink











Voltaic by Bjork











Got Nuffin by Spoon











Wilco (The Album) by Wilco











Wait For Me by Moby







also out 7/7...






Upper Air by Bowerbirds











Until the Earth Begins To Part by Broken Records











LP by Discovery










Blacksummer's Night by Maxwell











Catacombs by Cass Mccombs











Those Darlins by Those Darlins











These Four Walls by We Were Promised Jetpacks




Michael Jackson: Top 5 Dance Songs + Popular MJ @ Amoeba: Luis @ Amoeba SF on CD sales + DJ Dave Paul's Top 5 MJ Floor Burners

Posted by Billyjam, July 8, 2009 06:05pm | Post a Comment
It has been almost two full weeks since Michael Jackson passed, but in that time the sudden and tragic death of the King of Pop has dominated the news worldwide. Even Sarah Palin's resignation as governer of Alaska last week -- a week after MJ's death -- was upstaged by Jackson news. 

And today, the day after the heavily publicized Michael Jackson funeral/memorial in LA, which drew a reported 31 million viewers in real time, stopping by the Amoeba Music San Francisco store further proved that the intense public absorption with all things Michael (especially his music) will likely last a good while longer.

Luis at the San Francisco Amoeba took time out to show me the MJ CDs that have been hot sellers at the store, including Thriller, Bad, Michael Jackson Number Ones, Vol. 1-Greatest Hits History, and Off The Wall. See below a video clip of Luis at Amoeba SF earlier this afternoon. Also this afternoon in San Francisco I caught up (by phone) with Dave Paul, who for the past few years has been throwing the popular Prince vs. Michael parties in SF and other West Coast cities where both he and fellow DJ Jeff Harris spin regularly. Paul has a pretty extensive Michael Jackson collection so I asked him to draw up for the Amoeblog a list of his party's Top Five Michael Jackson dance floor burners -- MJ songs that always get the dance floor going. His list, including a brief description of each song, is below, along with info on the next SF Prince vs Michael party, which should be pretty wild since it will be the first since MJ's passing. The video for "Don't Stop TIl You Get Enough" is also below.

Confession

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 8, 2009 05:55pm | Post a Comment

Confession is a crime drama anthology that originally aired on NBC from July 5 to September 14 in 1953, Sunday nights at 9:30. Each episode featured Paul Frees as Richard McGee -- then the director of California Department of Corrections. John Wald was the announcer.

                

The rest of the cast changed from episode to episode and was a veritable "who’s who" of radio talent of the era, including: Alice Reinhardt, Anthony Barrett (aka Tony Barrett), Barney Phillips, Charlotte Lawrence, Dan Rhys, Eddie Firestone, Eve McVeagh, George Peroni, Gerald Mohr, Gloria Grant, Helen Kleeb, Jack Kruschen, Jack Moyles, James Edwards, Jay Loughlin, Jester Hairston, Joel Davis, John Crawford, John McIntire, Jonathan Hole, Joyce McCluskey, Lamont Johnson, Lurene Tuttle, Les Tremayne, Maidie Norman, Marvin Miller, Sam Edwards, Stacy Harris, Virginia Gregg, Vivvie Jennis and Warren Stevens.

Each episode begins with the Wald solemnly intoning “The confession you are about to hear is an actual recording...” (followed by two loud, distinct beeps of the Canadian Beeper Phone). Then the interviewer vocally encourages the convict to begin their confession, gently prodding “alright... go ahead... make the statement please." Then the convict/protagonist reads the beginning of their confession before the program segues into a dramatization of the events of the confessor's arrest.

In the premiere episode, the interviewer suggests “if there’s comfort for the listeners it’s that you’ve [the convict] been apprehended.” The way the criminals give their accounts is distinguishable from comparable examples with fictional stories of most TV, film and radio of their era. Unlike those frequently over-the-top characterizations of criminals, on Confession, the criminals laconically tell their tales with unpretentious, unembellished language spoken with the seemingly distinct cadences, accents and slang of the era. The realism is further abetted by the subtle acting, with characters coughing, occasionally mumbling unintelligibly and sometimes interrupted by the interviewer giving instructions to speak up, lean toward the mic or sometimes even correcting the confessor's reading of their own confessions as they convincingly stumble through their written accounts. The sound effects are used sparingly and skillfully and the most memorable sound is that of the spare, haunting piano score of Michael Sumogi (or Somage in some accounts) which contributes to an uneasy disquiet.

out this week 6/16 & 6/23...legends...mars volta...little boots...

Posted by Brad Schelden, July 8, 2009 04:10pm | Post a Comment

I am obsessed with two very different albums the last couple of weeks. There might be those of you out there obessed with the new Little Boots. And I know there are those of you obsessed with Mars Volta...But there might not be many people into both these groups. I assume most people who like The Mars Volta are probably not big fans of pop music, and most fans of pop music are not big fans of The Mars Volta. They are sort of extreme opposites -- but I love them both. It keeps my life interesting. I have never been into just one specific genre of music. I am sure you have all heard of Lady Gaga by now. She sort of took over the world this year. It was hard to stay away from "Just Dance" or "Poker Face." There was obviously a big hole before she came along. We obvioulsy needed her. Love her or hate her, she made an impressively catchy dance pop album. I don't know where we would be without her. However, she has been overplayed just a bit. I guess DJs just don't know what else to play. Every little boots handstime I turn on the radio I can always find a Lady Gaga song. And I am not just talking about a couple of months ago -- this is still the case. Every time you go into a bar and most certainly a gay bar, you are bound to hear some Lady Gaga. Pop music needs stars like her. It would be nothing without her. I still sort of appreciate that she exists but I am done. I have had enough! So I was happy to first hear about Little Boots. She couldn't come to us at a better time. Her debut album Hands is out now as an import. It might not come out domestically until 2010, so you might have a couple of months to get into her before the rest of America does. I am sure she will take over the world quickly. If she could even get a fourth of the airtime that Lady Gaga got, I am sure she could become a star out here.

Victoria Christina Hesketh, also know as Little Boots, is from the UK...sort of England's answer to Lady Gaga. She has the same sort of electronic pop sound as Lady Gaga, but I find it more interesting. I might get sick of it in a year, but for now it is a great alternative. The album is nothing if not fun. It is hard to get through the album without a smile on your face. And all the songs on the album really hold up to the others -- not a bad song on the album. One of my favorites on the album is "Symmetry." It is a duet with Philip Oakley who I recognized immediately as the voice of The Human League. A perfect man for her to do a duet with. The song is really brilliant. He helped create the genre she is emulating, so it is nice to see him on the album. She is not really doing anything that drastically different than Lady Gaga, Madonna, Santogold, Robyn, or Kylie Minogue. It is just pop music. Music that is easy to fall in love with. But it is also the kind of music that is easy to hate and make fun of, which I think is where Lady Gaga is headed right now. I am sure that there are fans out there that will defend her until they die, but this is the nature of pop music. It is not always timeless. It can quickly feel outdated mostly just from being completely overplayed. I have even been known to hate certain songs by Depeche Mode and The Cure. It is nice to hear the songs you love over and over again, but there is always the tipping point when you have heard it one too many times and don't ever want to hear it again.

I have been a long time fan of The Mars Volta since before their first EP came out in 2002. I really loved At the Drive-In and was sort of devastated when they broke up. I only got into them their last couple of years but luckily I got to see them live a couple of times. It seemed that just as I was getting the mars voltaobsessed they decided to call it quits. They basically split and became The Mars Volta and Sparta. My sadness quickly became replaced by joy once the two bands started releasing albums. I loved the Tremulant EP. I loved the first full length album De-Loused in the Crematorium. Frances the Mute came out in 2005. I still liked the album but my love was just not as strong. They released two more album in 2006 and 2008 but I just never got into them like the first couple. So I was expecting to probably like the new album, but not to really want to listen to it over and over again. I do love Cedric's voice. It is why I keep coming back for more. It is one of those weird and fantastic voices that I just can't get enough of. It is the reason I first got interested in At the Drive-In. The new album is called Octahedron. I do love it. It did not take much time at all for me to like it. It reminds me much more of their first album than anything that they have done since. They may have gotten a bit too proggy for me with the last couple of albums, but I love what they have created with this new album and I can't stop listening to it. I am glad that they are back in my life.

also out 6/17...






Over & Over by The Legends






also out 6/23...






Farm by Dinosaur Jr.











Split CD by Envy/Jesu











Travels with Myself & Another By Future of the Left











God Help the Girl by God Help the Girl











Hangover Soundtrack











Deliverance by Hawk & a Hacksaw











Last Choice by Love Is All











Dragonslayer by Sunset Rubdown











Beacons of Ancestory by Tortoise




Dance Music All Night Long

Posted by Smiles Davis, July 8, 2009 03:43pm | Post a Comment
Music, good music, is popping up everywhere and I’m loving every minute of it. Dance music in particular is really having the best year ever. I’m not just talking about house and techno, I’m talking about music that makes you wanna boogie, music that really makes you wanna get down with the get down and forget all your worries. I don't exactly know who to give credit to for putting the fun back in music but one thing is absolute: everything eventually comes full circle.

Back in the day—we’re talking the 70’s—there was disco, a little bit of hip-hop, some more disco, what was left of modern jazz, rock-n-roll, and a little more disco. The best thing about urban nightlife at that time was disco. And you didn’t hear none of that A.D.D. DJ we hear so frequently today, where the music selector changes songs every thirty seconds (thanks a lot DJ AM). No, none of that. The DJ’s at the discotheques usually played the long versions of songs, nearly in their entirety, to keep the feet on the dance floor all night long. Oh, how things have changed.

At that time, people weren’t up on hip-hop like that quite yet; it was still pretty underground. You had to know where to go to find a DJ spinning hip-hop. And chances are, if you knew about it, you knew it was the only spot in town where you could go to hear that type of music. Not to mention the fact that that one and only spot was probably members only. You had to be affiliated with a crew to gain access. If you weren’t a part of a tagging crew, a breaking crew, or one of the emcees or DJs, chances were you didn’t even know about it. But, back to disco. It started mainly on the east coast in the late 60’s. By the early 70’s disco had cross-pollinated and spread like wild fire all over the globe. Most popular soul and funk acts like Earth, Wind & Fire and The Bar-kays soon jumped ship and found themselves chin deep in the disco trend. Unfortunately, like most fads, disco was finished quicker than morning coffee and soon disappeared from the radar. For the most part, I think the public wanted it that way. Disco Demolition Night, a promotional event that took place on Thursday, July 12, 1979, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois, was in part to blame for the end of an era. However, industry folk and even many consumers talked about the decline of the genre long before this event took place.  

Disco, although short lived, was to music, in part, what the sex, drugs and rock n roll generation, better known as New Hollywood was to post- classical Hollywood in the 60’s, 70’s and early 80's. Well, sort of, not really, but they had many similarities: together they completely altered the conventional format of entertainment, they were relentlessly rebellious, adored by tweens, and utterly despised by conservatives. Also, the misfits of Hollywood during that time were the first to recognize film as an art form, while the DJs of the disco era catapulted advancements in turntablism and too recognized it as an art form. Disco faded to black shortly before the “movie brats” did.  

Still, disco influenced many styles of music, including hip-hop and electronica. Donna Summer, one of the more notable disco singers, was the first to really incorporate electronica into the popular dance style. Today, a number of acts are bringing it back like an 8-track. Holy Ghost, Men, Hercules and Love Affair and compilations like Italo Disco are all making strides to breathe some life back into the genre. Hi-5 disco! The good times are well overdue.

Also influenced by disco, or dance music in general, was Baltimore Club music, better know as Bmore. Bmore is so hot right now. Let me tell you from a DJ’s perspective: All the kiddies love it! Nothing packs the dance floor quicker than a Bmore remix. The “Remix” evolved out of disco, by the way, thanks to Tom Moulton, and later spread into hip-hop, pop and other styles of dance music like techno.

The front-runners of the current Bmore movement are the best things since sliced bread. The key players include DJ Class, Aaron Lacrate, Diplo, Switch, and DJ Blaqstarr, just to name a few. And it just so happens they’re all DJ’s. Major Lazer, the brainchild of Diplo & Switch, and the new kids on the block, is making noise all over the Internet. The single “Hold The Line” packs the dance floor any time and anywhere I play it. Same thing with DJ Class’ “I’m the Ish.” Works like a charm every time. Even mainstream acts like the Black Eyed Peas have hopped aboard the bandwagon with their single “Boom Pow.” Something tells me Baltimore Club will be around for a while. Go on back that thang up, get your Bmore on! Let's dance, not fight.

Bill Withers Interview on the Sound of Young America

Posted by Miss Ess, July 7, 2009 05:08pm | Post a Comment
Have you, like me, been wondering where Bill Withers has been for the past few decades, and what he's been up to? If so, please check out this fantastic, brand new interview with Withers by Jesse Thorn on his consistantly awesome radio show, The Sound of Young America. You can listen to the show right here!

The Sound of Young America


Bill Withers' songs are timeless, achingly beautiful and some of the very best out there, as far as I'm concerned. In the interview, among other things, he describes his involvement in the upcoming concert film Soul Power, documenting a 1974 Zaire music festival, where he got to hang out with the likes of James Brown, Muhammad Ali and Don King!

Withers' notable albums include Just As I Am (1971), Still Bill (1972), +Justments (1974), and several others.

There is something so simply powerful about his songs, particularly watching him play live -- an undeniably excellent, unique songwriter. Please check out "Grandma's Hands":


and here's another favorite, "Use Me":

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Cypress Park

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 7, 2009 05:00pm | Post a Comment
In this installment of the Los Angeles neighborhood blog, we visit Cypress Park. To vote for the neighborhood you think I should visit next, go here or to vote for a Los Angeles County community you'd like to see covered, go here. To vote for Orange County neighborhoods, vote here.

The western entry into the neighborhood

Cypress Park is a neighborhood in northeast Los Angeles hemmed in by Mt. Washington to the northeast, the LA River on the southwest and Lincoln Heights to the south.
 
Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Maps of Northeast Los Angeles and Cypress Park

At Division and San  Fernando, it shares a short border with Glassell Park. At Marmion and Figueroa, it shares an even shorter border with Highland Park.

A view of Cypress Park from Frogtown with Mt. Washington in the background

Cypress Park is sometimes refered to as Cypress Parque -- and as Chavala Park by silly haters. However, most Angelenos erroneously refer to it (when they do at all) as Highland Park. Nonetheless, Cypress Park has a unique history and is the location of several places of historical note.

 
For a city as famous for its murals as Los Angeles is, for the most part Cypress Park has very few. On the left is Tlaloc.

Cypress Park is located in the narrow lowlands between the river and the hills to the northeast and south. Some of the older houses are, not surprisingly, quaint, attractive and often feature well-tended yards. As with much of Los Angeles, there are also loads of hideous dingbats the color of dirty, faded band-aids and protected by security bars. Cypress Park's residents are 82% Latino (mostly Mexican) of any race, 11% Asian (mostly Chinese), and 5% white.


A typical street in Cypress Park




Shady Cypress Avenue

The Jeffries family were some of the earliest residents of note in the modern era. They were responsible for developing what was then known as the Jeffries-Highland. Their Victorian mansion was removed to build Florence Nightingale Middle School. Florence Nightingale's story has been the subject of several films and plays. Below is a clip from one featuring two of my favorite actors, Jeremy Brett and Jaclyn Smith.



The Arroyo Theatre today (image source: You Are Here)


Along San Fernando Road, in the western portion of the neighborhood, is a long industrial corridor, quite like most, with nameless, faceless manufacturers, collision repair specialists, &c.

 


Behind the corridor, where Isabel Street comes to an end (after an intersection with Bank Street) as a very narrow dead end, the so-called "Avenida Assecinos" [sic] became notorious when a white family was shot there around 3 a.m., looking for a shortcut or drugs, depending on who you believe. Although Cypress Park unfortunately has a fairly high crime rate, white people being killed there is rare and was serious enough that it resulted in Bill Clinton getting involved.


El Atacor #1

  
King Taco No. 1

To pretentious foodies for whom the most important aspects of restaurant choice are obscurity and authenticity, Figueroa Street is home to many Mexican restaurants that your friends haven't heard of. For those who aren't engaged in a game of one-upsmanship, Figueroa Street is also home to many trusty chains. Cypress Park is also noteworthy in culinary history as the home of the first El Atacor (located in Cypress Plaza) and the first King Taco (on Cypress).

Elysian Valley on the left, Cypress Park on the right (c. 1925)

   
Rio de Los Angeles Park

Back in the 1960s, the 247-acre freight switching facility known as Taylor Yard wound down. In the 1980s it was just used for storage and maintenance. Although there's still some train stuff over there, a large portion of the former yard is now the nicely done Rio de Los Angeles park, with multiple soccer fields, basketball and tennis courts, and baseball diamonds.

Footsies

In the early part of the 20th century, Cypress Park was a mostly working class Italian neighborhood. Now, most of the residents are of Mexican or Chinese backgrounds. Nonetheless, a few guilt-plagued weddos have apologetically suggested that their going to the popular bar Footsies (not possessive) on weekends amounts to gentrification. Not to worry, when they head back across the river, the resultant white flight erases the unavoidable "damage" done by Caucasian migration.

Footsies is a bar owned or co-owned by Greg Dulli of Afghan Whigs and Twilight Singers. Footsies is also notable for nearly always containing at least one Amoeba employee, whether drinking, DJing or bar-backing... (or all three). The video below immortalizes the bar, although it features no Amoebas.

Veuillez installer Flash Player pour lire la vidéo



*****


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Michael Jackson's Funeral - Tell em That Is Human Nature

Posted by Miss Ess, July 7, 2009 01:50pm | Post a Comment
I found myself more emotional than I expected watching Michael Jackson's funeral today.


Basically, Stevie Wonder's performance shredded me, with a combo of "I Never Dreamed You'd Leave In Summer"/"They Won't Go When I Go," one of his most powerful songs.

Watching the service made me think about nostalgia, and in spite of myself and my own feelings about the circus known as Michael Jackson, mainly reminded me of something I was surprised to have forgotten: the power of music to unite, to heal and to inspire. The service presented in some ways (and in some performances) portraits from a different time not only culturally, but also in the music industry, when music had that power to unite, to surprise and delight us on a grand scale.


I hadn't listened to Jackson that much, really, since the early 90s. I wouldn't call myself a huge fan of his music, but like everyone the world over, his music was nonetheless the soundtrack to my life. In my case, it was Thriller, then Bad and Dangerous, but his work stretched all the way back to "ABC," and though he had been much maligned over the last few decades, his music and its influence have both been undeniable and inescapable.

Watching the funeral made me think about lost innocence, how Michael's was taken too soon by the road and by adult expectations. Berry Gordy said during the service that there was "happiness in [Michael's] soul when he performed." It was as though the joy had been squeezed out of the other parts of his life, except when he came alive on stage, and then it was so very palpable. He spent the rest of his life very blatantly and bizarrely chasing that innocence he had lost at such a young age.

Watching all the performers pay tribute to Jackson, I was reminded that my own childhood innocence and that of so many others was tracked by Jackson's music and videos, as though in a way he sacrificed his childhood to make that of several generations worth of kids' improved. By the time I was a teen, he had been rocked by scandal and all but disappeared. To the world at large he became a punchline rather than an artist or even a human, really.

Watching and listening to old clips and tracks the past week or so has brought me back to a simpler, more hopeful time, when at 5 I taped small change to a piece of paper to send to the children in Africa because of "We Are the World" and to a time when dancing alone could look like magic. It made me think about that feeling of magic and wonder how or when it slipped away.

I think when we mourn Michael Jackson (however it is that we may do so, on a large or small scale), we mourn our own childhoods, our own lost dreams.

No matter how you slice it, he was an icon, and his death presents a marked finality to an era in some ways, and another reminder of how far we are from what we once were.

HOMOHOP'S ROLE WITHIN HIP-HOP: JUBA KALAMKA INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, July 7, 2009 12:12pm | Post a Comment
Juba Kalamka
     Juba Kalamka performing at Amoeba Music San Francisco's recent Pride '09 in-store celebration with Pick Up The Mic stars. Also performing were JenRO and Dutchboy (6/25/09).
All photos from the event by Kaitlin Layher


Juba Kalamka was recently part of the Amoeba Music San Francisco in-store Pride '09 Celebration, which was also a DVD release party for the seminal "homohop" documentary Pick Up The Mic. Juba, along with fellow Bay Area queer rap artists JenRO and Dutchboy, who also performed that day at the Haight Street store (view all the pictures here), is one of the many talented stars of the must-see, Alex Hinton directed film. Although the film first screened a few years ago, it is only very recently available on DVD.

In early 2000 Juba Kalamka (aka Pointfivefag), along with Tim'm T. West (aka 25percenter) and Phillip Juba KalamkaAtiba Goff (aka Lightskindid) formed Deep Dickollective (D/DC), which also featured member Ralowe Ampu (G-Minus). The seeds for D/DC were sown a year earlier after Kalamka and West met at Stanford following a 1999 screening of black gay filmmaker and scholar Marlon Riggs' film Tongues Untied. I personally first heard of and met the guys from D/DC about a year into their career, and, most impressed with their hip-hop skills in combination with their refreshing take on a genre traditionally drenched in homophobia, I invited them to be included on one of the Amoeba Music Compilations.

THREE DEGREES SINGER FAYETTE PINKNEY DIES

Posted by Billyjam, July 6, 2009 03:30pm | Post a Comment
The Three Degrees perform "TSOP" and "Year of Decision" live on BBC (1975)

The music world lost yet another star recently when Fayette Pinkney of the Three Degrees died last The Three Degreesweekend in Lansdale, PA, a result of acute respiratory failure according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. She was only 61 years of age. Pinkney, who was an original member of the Philly soul trio, lent her powerful voice to the 1970s soul hits “When Will I See You Again?” (see video below) and “T.S.O.P. (The Sound of Philadelphia)” (aka the theme song of the TV show Soul Train).

The video clip above was recorded for the BBC in 1975 for a special that aired on the UK channel in July of that year. The above excerpt from that special includes the group performing the aforementioned Soul Train anthem, "TSOP," and also their first big UK hit, "Year of Decision."

When the Three Degrees first formed in the early 1960s Pinkney was still a student at Overbrook High School in Philadelphia. As a part of the Three Degrees she contributed to helping define "the Philadelphia sound." In their time the Three Degrees were considered by many to be a Philly version of the Supremes.
 


The Three Degrees "When Will I See You Again"

(Before which the author's mother visits.)

Posted by Job O Brother, July 6, 2009 02:58pm | Post a Comment

That's my Ma, milking the cow. (The cow is the one with horns.)

This past week my dear, sweet Ma came for a visit. Her time here flew by quickly; we entertained ourselves with long walks, stories from her youth, and cooking-related reality TV. I also introduced her to one of my best friends in the whole world: absinthe.

She has a new iPhone, but her fear of technology had limited her use of it to – get this – making phone calls! I mean, what’s the point of a phone if all you do with it is call people? That’s so 1990’s! So I introduced her to all the things her new phone could do: map out directions, take photos, slay red dragons, make chocolate sprinkles, cure melanoma and make other kinds of chocolate sprinkles. She was quick to learn and I expect she will soon be filling my email inbox with pictures of my nephews, her tomato plants, and chocolate sprinkles.

In honor of her visit, I have assembled the following short list of things she loves, in hopes that you, too, may find some joy in them. If you’re not interested, don’t worry – she’s very easy-going and non-judgmental, and won’t take offense. I, however, will hunt you down like a dog and slay you. With my iPhone.

Glenn Gould


Chopsticks!

One of the most famous classical pianists of all time, and still controversial, Glenn Gould was the very definition of an eccentric genius. Most famous for his interpretations of J.S. Bach’s music for keyboard, Gould also championed modern composers, such as Alban Berg and Arnold Schönberg, while frequently disparaging more popular composers such as Frédéric Chopin and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, finding their works often insincere and unsatisfying (a sentiment, incidentally, I share with Gould).


Gould died at age 50, leaving behind a rich and compelling catalogue of recordings and a few pairs of very rank smelling gloves.

In addition to some more traditional documentaries, there’s a film entitled 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould that provides an entertaining (perhaps more than deep) look at this musical prodigy.


He also provides the soundtrack for my Mother’s iPhone ringtone.

His Hand in Mine – Elvis Presley


Ma was raised in the church, where she played organ, piano and served as choral director. She also arranged flowers and… I dunno – probably designed the stained-glass windows, too. The church was in Florin, California, which had been mostly populated by Japanese farmers until, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government forced the Japanese into concentration camps – an event that seems remarkably absent from our consideration of American history.


Florin, California (circa what I'm talkin' about)

Anyway, at this time in Florin, there was really nothing to do but milk cows, watch the strawberries grow, and participate in church functions, which is what so occupied Ma’s time. Playing music served as one of Ma’s few truly fun activities, and her association with old hymns remains a positive one, although her belief in the traditional tenants of Protestantism has been replaced by something more akin to Shirley MacLaine’s persuasions.

If you want to see Ma’s eyes glaze over in bliss (and you know you do) I suggest spinning this album from Elvis Presley.


Carlos Montoya

Another controversial, artistic genius Ma gravitates towards is the flamenco guitarist Carlos Montoya.


"Mine! All mine! Ahahahahahaha...!!!"

Montoya is renowned as much for his agility at playing guitar as he was for his ability to fly. He could fly in the air of his own volition and remains the first and only human in history to do so. It was on Montoya that Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster based their superhero creation, Superman. This resulted in Montoya suing the comic writers in a case that was ultimately settled out of court, with Montoya being paid off in raisins, his favorite between-meal snack.

The following song was composed by Montoya for his wife, Lois, who would eventually divorce him, complaining that his willingness to work for dried fruit made life with the musician “crazy-making” and “mostly fucked.”


My Ma may have returned to the glorious state of Northern California, but she remains an eternal houseguest in my heart …where she is currently building a pulpit and brand-new steeple.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 07/10/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 6, 2009 02:42pm | Post a Comment

  
New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:


Mathew Jonson 
WALKING ON THE HANDS...12"
WAG050 MUS (light blue colored vinyl)

MATHEW JONSON's new 12" sees him unearthing more quirky, haunting melodies over floor friendly percussion. It's chilling and cinematic. "WHEN LOVE FEELS LIKE CRYING" includes harmonic fragments with punchy bass tones playing the central hook.


DMX Krew 
COME TO ME 12"
PERMVAC034 

1st release in PERMANENT VACATIONS's new EVER GREEN. This new wave/electro cut comes with an exclusive instrumental version on the flip.

Adele vs Mick Boogie 1988 LP ADELEBOOGIE1

Ancient Astronauts CLASSIC 12" ESL155  

Miss Dica FREAK EP 12" 3EEP103

Baker Bros FAMILY TREE 12" FSR072 

Depeche Mode BEHIND THE WHEEL RMX 12" DAI02

Diplo & Blaqstarr GET OFF 12" MAD093

Headman DREAMPIECES (ZONGAMIN REMIX) 12" RR034 

Moby PALE HORSES REMIX (GER IMPORT) 12" MOSMOBY1 

Savage Skulls BUMPS EP 12" DSD023        

New House/Disco 12"s Coming this Weekend:

METAL MONDAY AMOEBLOG: SKELETONWITCH, TOP 14, AIR-GUITAR

Posted by Billyjam, July 6, 2009 12:22pm | Post a Comment
Fourteen Metal/Black Metal Favorites @ Amoeba Music
Veritas Diaboli Manet in Aeternum: Chaining the Katechon
1) Deathspell Omega Veritas Diaboli Manet in Aeternum: Chaining The Katechon (Norma Evangelium Diaboli)

2) Horna Sanojesi Aarelle (Debemur Morti)

3) Old Wainds Death Nord Kult (Debemur Morti)

4) Darkthrone Dark Thrones & Black Flags (Peaceville)

5) Ofermod Tiamtu (Norma Evangelium Diaboli)

6) Bahimiron Southern Nihilizm (Moribund Records)

7) Satyricon Age Of Nero (Koch Records)

8) Taake Taake (Century Media)

cannibal corpse9) Cattle Decapitation The Harvest Floor (Metal Blade)

10) Khold Hundre ar gammal (Candlelight Records)

11) Capricorns River, Bear Your Bones (Rise Above Records)

12) Enslaved Vertabrae (Nuclear Blast)

13) Cannibal Corpse Evisceration Plague (Metal Blade)

14) Cynic Traced in Air (Season Of Mist)

The above list of fourteen metal/black metal releases (not in any particular order) popular with Amoeba folks is culled from the current Spring/Summer 2009 Music We Like booklet regularly published by Amoeba Music and available for free at each Amoeba Music store. The first listed release, Veritas Diaboli Manet in Aeternum: Chaining the Katechon, is a split EP by French bands released December 2008. The title Veritas Diabolo Manet in Aeternum is a work of two French black metal bands: Deathspell Omega (Chaining the Katechon) and S.V.E.S.T. (Le Diable est ma Raison).

Soul In The Park Turns One

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 6, 2009 09:52am | Post a Comment
One of my favorite deejay nights happens every other Wednesday at Footsie's in Highland Park. Rani D's Soul In The Park turns one on Wednesday, July 8th. Rani is the resident deejay for the night, which includes special guest spots from deejays from thoughout the city. Every night is special. It feels more like a curated art show than a club. It could be Jazz one night, Hip-Hop the next, Cumbia, Brazilian; you name it, he has had it there. Soul In The Park is a music lover's dream. For this special event, Rani's guest will be Buyepongo, a live Cumbia group. They don't have many bands at Footsie's, so this should be a night to remember.
----------------------------------------

seven. eight. nine.
next wednesday marks one year of growth nurtured by beautiful people, beautiful music, and beautiful connections. what better way to celebrate then spending an easy wednesday night affirming friendship and growth while grooving to some of the best live roots music in los angeles... in the intimate setting that is Footsie's. love and festivity will be in the air, along with other things that blow in the wind... so please allow us to engage your senses as we celebrate this moment to the fullest! if you are free to join us for this truly special occasion, your presence would bring us that much closer...


- SOUL IN THE PARK turns ONE - 
Wednesday 07.08.09 with special friends:

BUYEPONGO (live cumbia rhythms)




resident selector: RANI D. FREE / 21+ / 10pm-2am



Footsie's Bar 2640 N. Figueroa St. Los Angeles, CA 90065 

MIchael Jackson Organ Tribute

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 5, 2009 11:25pm | Post a Comment
I know that the world is currently inundated with MJ news. That said, I figured that since I made a church organ related post last week, I should follow it up with the footage from Robert Ridgell's tribute to Michael. Although the Trinity Wall Street Church's organ is an electric facsimile of a pipe organ, I'll give them a pass, as it seems their old pipe organ was taken out by 9-11 debris & fallout.

Ultraflash!

Posted by phil blankenship, July 5, 2009 11:12pm | Post a Comment
 


Vestron Video VA 2018

Up & Down: Up (2009) & Drag Me to Hell (2009)

Posted by Charles Reece, July 5, 2009 09:50pm | Post a Comment

The Plot. Two things struck me about the celebrated elliptical opening sequence of UP, where the young version of Carl, the protagonist, is shown to age and fall in love with Ellie, who remains dead for most the picture: (1) Despite Pixar's raison d'etre, overloaded digital spectacle, what the company excels at is character portraiture. This tends to be done in the first third of their stories, after which the plot kicks in, and I get bored. Unlike Wall-E, however, UP is mostly about Carl just hanging out in his floating house, talking to this chubby little cub scout stowaway, and befriending some linguistically enhanced canines. All of which makes it the best Pixar film to date. (2) Seijun Suzuki and Pixar know something about generic expectations that Steven Spielberg doesn't. Like all moviegoers, my emotions are mechanized, habituated responses to the levers, pulleys and cables of traditional storytelling. Thus, in abstracto, I'll feel elation on cue when the hero risks it all to save those more unfortunate than he, even if the particularities involve an Aryan saving some Jews (a lesson that can be had from Star Wars' appropriation of Triumph of The Will). These 2 and 1/2 hour-long movies of Spielberg's could be cut down to a few, brief sequences leading to the big crescendo, and we'd all still have the same reaction. Much like Suzuki tends to jump cut over the dramatic cliches in his films, Carl meets Ellie, they share similar interests, yadda yadda yadda, she's dead, now her absence structures our understanding of Carl for the rest of UP. Less flippantly worded: poetic resonance isn't based on word count, nor are genre pleasures.

Also, I loved the fact that the 3D was used to enhance the depth of field, rather than as an excuse to throw junk at the audience.


Across the street from where I grew up in a suburban cul-de-sac of Dallas, the long-time resident died, and his family turned the house into a rental. This did not make the the neighbors happy, including my father. The first tenant was a large family of Romani. Now, Dad had never spoken a racialist word in my entire existence, but, out of nowhere, he started going on about how gypsies will leave whatever property they briefly stay on in ruins. How the hell does a Texan get a bigoted view of gypsies, anyway? Hollywood?

The Plot. Antiziganism seems to have made its way to Michigan suburbs, too, if Sam and Ivan Raimi's Drag Me to Hell is any indication. Tellingly, not one professional review that I could find mentions the stereotypical portrayal of the Romani as a demonic people. Yet, to this day, you'd be hardpressed to find a discussion of Merchant of Venice without a reference to antisemitism. Imagine if the villain of the film were a hooknosed banker stealing the lead's money, or conspiring to take over the economic system for world domination. Would that still be just a particularlized fantasy, with no implications for the real world? On the other hand, implicit within the Raimis' story is something like a critique of the cariacature it perpetuates: even if a nomadic people wish to settle down under modern day capitalism, there are structures in place, a historico-economic treatment that helps to reinforce their place in society's shadows. 

The film is significantly less kind to bankers. Christine, a loan officer, gets a curse placed on her after refusing to give an extension on a mortgage to an old gypsy lady. Christine wants to give the extension, but doesn't in order to demonstrate that she's willing to do "what it takes" to get a promotion. This is a variation on Hannah Arendt's banality of evil. That is, evil isn't the result of some particularly demonic individual, but of people just working within a system that is itself immoral. Christine doesn't seem to be a particularly bad person, but just like with the Jerusalem conviction of Adolf Eichmann, the film holds her responsible for her actions by placing a retributive knee to her throat, and not letting up. It's a lot easier to get behind punishing an individual who worked under Nazi law than one working under American capitalism. But, by saying one is responsible for legal actions taken within an immoral system, the notion of "innocence" becomes a matter of power, or the winning side. Not an easy question (or a popular one to address) when discussing terrorism, or avenging demons.

There is a core meanness to Drag Me to Hell's cold, detached (i.e., anti-utilitarian) morality that I found refreshing. Highly recommended.

Yankee Rose: Happy 233rd America!

Posted by Kells, July 5, 2009 02:23pm | Post a Comment

With another fourth of July behind us, I'd like to give big ups to fireworks, baseball, grilled meat, cold beer and David Lee Roth and his hit "Yankee Rose" for making this holiday weekend sparkle like, well, like the fourth of July, actually. Roth and rock 'n' roll guitar-mystic Steve Vai penned the song in 1986 for Roth's debut solo effort, entitled Eat 'Em And Smile. The song is credited as a dedication to the Statue of Liberty (which was undergoing renovation at that time and thus was a hot topic of sorts). It is interesting that the intro sequence for the video of "Yankee Rose" seems to attempt a showcase of immigrant stereotypes in a corner convenience store setting --- is the audience supposed to somehow relate to your friendly neighborhood bodega? I can't figure out if I find it appealingly appalling or appallingly appealing, but then this feeling is almost immediately washed away by the savage animal that is Roth's demand for, "a bottle of anything and a glazed donut, TO GO!" followed by a rigorous display of high impact aerobics and the flashiest array of spandex you'll ever see stretched across one's person, ass-less or off-the-shoulder. Hooray for the U.S.A.!

 

AMOEBLOG'S SUMMER GRAFFITI SERIES: PART I, INTRO

Posted by Billyjam, July 4, 2009 11:58am | Post a Comment
DREAM R.I.P.

This is the kick-off post in a seven-week summer series of Graffiti Amoeblogs, focusing on the art of graffiti and running every Saturday from now, July 4th, until Saturday, August 15th, 2009 -- the date that will mark what would have been the 40th birthday of Mike DREAM Francisco, the legendary Bay Area graffiti artist who was tragically murdered nine years ago on the streets of Oakland. Rest in peace, DREAM. Your legacy will live forever.

Included in the numerous blogs in this series will be an interview with DEMER of the longtime NYC Wallnuts crew, who decades later is still making graffiti art, and who currently runs the store Graffiti Comix in Belleville, New Jersey, where he combines his two life-long passions/hobbies -- graffiti and comic books. There will also be an interview with OB, who runs the graffiti supply (and record) store All City in Dublin, Ireland. That same Graffiti Amoeblomiami graffitig will also take a look at the Irish graffiti scene.

James & Karla Murray, the hard working and prolific graffiti photo-journalists (Broken Windows, Burning New York, Store Front, Miami Graffiti), will also be interviewed here and high-quality images of their best New York City and Miami graffiti shots will also be included. Future Amoeblogs will also focus on Cali graffiti and its makers, and of course there will be a whole blog dedicated to DREAM, who was an amazing artist. 

July 3: This Week At The New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, July 3, 2009 11:33pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The July calendar is now online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday July 3 & 4

Celebrate Independence Day At The New Beverly!

Two Starring The Legendary James Cagney

Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)
Get ready to Laugh, to Sing, to Shout! ...For here comes Uncle Sam's Star Spangled Yankee Doodle Dandy!
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0035575/
dir. Michael Curtiz, starring James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, Richard Whorf, Irene Manning
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 2:45 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

New Electronic CD Releases 7/3/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 3, 2009 03:20pm | Post a Comment

PLANETARY ASSAULT SYSTEMS

Temporary Suspension
Ostgut

Planetary Assault Systems is the legendary, harder-edged techno project from the UK's Luke Slater, and this is his first full-length effort after more than 7 years. Temporary Suspension is released as a continuous mix of 10 tracks on CD, as well as 6 single tracks on a double 12", and defies any current sound trends. However, Slater himself states that it's "time to bring the funk and intensity back in a new way. Time to open the sound again." In addition to funk and intensity, Slater manages to create an industrial strength and energy that has evolved over the years -- ranging from aggressive techno to very deep and melancholy pieces that still retain an alien feeling. The first track "Open Up" sets the pace for things to come, already, with a driving groove and a thunderstorm of synths cutting through a confusing melody of chimes. Subsequently, the loud and fast "Whoodoo" dives deep into the primordial blend of techno, using an uncompromising, metallic percussion. "Om The Def" takes the foot off the gas pedal, marking one of the album's definite highlights by using an arrangement of bongos and a funky, distorted bass line oscillating between dense and airy aggregate states. "Hold It" is an unbelievably sexy Chicago house stomper reminiscent of a modern version of an Amando track. "Attack Of The Mutant Camels" fascinates with its noise and bleep fest, complete with a decelerated rhythm and a fierce bass line. On "Gateway To Minia" he loses the beat in favor of gloomy ambient synth chords culminating in a cacophony of noise. But the album does not end here, as he brings back the kick on "Sticker Men" one last time with the crowd firmly set in his sights. Luke Slater's sonic vision on Temporary Suspension as a rough and highly energetic sound hardly comes as a surprise, as he has continually tested and pushed his musical boundaries ever since releasing his first tracks in 1989. Planetary Assault Systems has always been Luke's pseudonym for hard and uncompromising techno, and almost all of his releases on Peacefrog have become classics of the genre. Luke has never been satisfied with exploring just one aspect of music, and is well-known for his eccentricity and rebelliousness, aspects that have held his audience captive in his extraterrestrial light-beam of past, present, and future. Heavy, grinding techno cuts that will most definitely rank as the best of 2009.

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP (JULY 4th WEEKEND)

Posted by Billyjam, July 3, 2009 11:30am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 07:03:09
The Jacka
1) The Jacka Tear Gas (SMC)

2) Big Rich Heart of the City (3 Story Muzik)

3) Raashan Amhad Soul Power (Crown City Rockers)

4) Wu Tang Chamber Music (KR Urban/KOCH)

5) Dead Prez + DJ Green Lantern Pulse Of The People (Turn Off The Radio Vol. 3) (IMG)

Thanks to Luis at the San Francisco Amoeba Music for this week's Hip-Hop Top Five Chart, which is  60% homegrown Bay Area talent this week, including the number this week at the Haight Street store: The Jacka and his latest full-length, Tear Gas. The album from the Mob Figaz member is doing well on the Billboard charts too. It debuted at #4 on the music trade magazine's Rap Charts, #12 on the R&B Charts, #13 on the Indie Charts, and at #93 on the Top 200 albums chart, 

With studio assistance from a dozen different producers, this follow up to The Jacka's popular 2008 mixtape, The Street Album, is the hard working Oakland-born/Pittsburg-raised rap artist's most diverse sounding release to date. Tear Gas features mic guests from far beyond the Bay, including Houston's Devin The Dude and Philly's Freeway. Of course, the Mob Figaz member is also joined by some of his Raashan AhmadYay Area peeps such as Mistah F.A.B., Andre Nickatina, and Zion I. Converted to Islam, The Jacka lets his faith be known on the album via lyrics such as "in Allah we trust, I try to purify my heart, because I’m a slave to my thoughts. I’m a monster out here, because I change when it’s dark" in the song "They Don't Know," on which he is joined by Freeway, who is a fellow Muslim.

Red Dawn Saturday At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, July 2, 2009 09:11pm | Post a Comment


Saturday July 4

25th Anniversary!

Patrick Swayze in

Red Dawn


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7


Actress Lea Thompson IN PERSON, schedule permitting, to discuss the movie!

OAKLAND FILM CELEBRATED IN OUTDOOR TEMESCAL STREET CINEMA

Posted by Billyjam, July 2, 2009 03:30pm | Post a Comment
The Second Annual Temescal Street Cinema, the unique grassroots Oakland outdoor film festival that began last summer to an extremely positive community response, is currently underway, with locally produced films being screened for free each Thursday evening after dark at 49th and Telegraph (behind the Temescal Street CinemaBank of the West Building). The North Oakland film festival's 2009 six-week summer season, which kicked off on Thursday, June 11th, distinguishes itself from most other US summer outdoor film screening events in that it specializes in showing locally made and produced films exclusively -- often films made within a short distance of the outdoor screening space. Tonight, starting around 8:30pm or a little after, as it gets dark, will be the screening of the two local films: Drylongso by Cauleen Smith and Smitten by Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto.

Darleen Drapkin, director of the Temescal Telegraph Business District, who has been doing a stellar job of developing the North Oakland area in recent years, told the Amoeblog, "The concept behind the film festival is part of our overall concept of shopping locally and trying to be independent and local whenever possible. It's easy to run Shrek and movies like that, but we try to stay local and independent and we sincerely take pride in the community here and what it has to offer." Arne Johnson, the producer and co-director of Girls Rock, which screened at the premiere Temescal Street Cinema festival last year, is the curator for this year's festival and he has chosen some excellent local films, from shorts to full-length features.

Amoeba's Pride 2009 Par-tay!

Posted by Amoebite, July 1, 2009 09:02pm | Post a Comment
irene at pride 2009

I attended my first pride in 2007, in San Francisco, naturally. My ‘Gay Day’ began with the Dyke rally in Dolores Park and then moved out onto the streets for the annual Dyke march. I was happy to be there. I had just come out a year before, finally! But aside from the excitement, the real meaning of that first Pride hadn’t really ‘hit’ me until I came across this woman of color -- a Latina, wearing a traditional ‘male’ mariachi outfit and holding a sign that read “Orgullo” (Pride). Then I felt it. It shot right through me -- it was electric. I understood who I was: a woman, a single mother, chicana, Mexican…

…gay.

rainbow flag

In society I am considered a minority, but in that moment I was part of something bigger than me. I was part of a community-- a community that celebrates individuality, diversity, tolerance, and love. 

This year my children experienced their first pride festival in Long Beach. I wanted them to feel what I had felt a couple of years prior. “Mom, this is so much fun! I’m proud you’re gay.” I cried when my son uttered those words to me. My daughter was so moved that for West Hollywood’s pride festival she designed a few signs of her own. They held their rainbow flags high and waved their signs proudly, signs with the word ‘PRIDE’ drawn and colored in the traditional rainbow flare.

Fast forward to this weekend, June 27/28, 2009: San Francisco’s Gay Pride Weekend sizzled. I should know -- I have the sunburn to prove it.

Peaches Christ Chats About Midnight Mass's Final Season

Posted by Miss Ess, July 1, 2009 05:17pm | Post a Comment
It's officially summertime, and if you live here in San Francisco, you know what that means:


It's time once again for drag queen and performer Peaches Christ's wild and wondrous cult film screening series, the singular, epic entertainment fest known as Midnight Mass!

Though we have been informed that this is Midnight Mass' final summer season at the Bridge Theater, its home for the past 12 years, Midnight Mass has clearly left an indelible mark on both San Francisco's cult and its overall cultural scene, one that will reverberate through the city's history for all time. In the meantime, we'd all better get out there and catch our last chance to see Peaches in her native environs at the Bridge. Here I speak with Ms. Christ about what's to come at this final season of Midnight Mass, her future projects, plus her role in alter ego Joshua Grannell's upcoming feature film, which is sure to be a huge hit, All About Evil! Click here for more info on Midnight Mass, which starts July 10 and runs weekends through August 22. Tickets are on sale now! You can also click here to read a previous interview I conducted with PC. Read on right here for all the exciting news.



Miss Ess: So, what new shows will debut this year at Midnight Mass?

Peaches Christ: For our 12th and final season, I'm thrilled to say we have a bunch of stuff we're doing for the first time including Roller Boogie, The Exorcist, Heathers, and Elvira: Mistress Of The Dark. It gets harder every year to dig up new and exciting cult films we haven't programmed sometime in the past twelve years. 

ME: I hear you have finally scored Heathers! How pumped are you to have one of the most iconic cult 80s films this year? Any teasers regarding the preshow entertainment?

PC: I can't even believe we're finally going to be able to do Heathers! I was obsessed with this movie when it came out. Full-on obsession. So, I'm trying to create a pre-show that really celebrates the film with the audience, something interactive, and something that showcases other people's obsession. Picture a full-on Heathers inspired game-show from hell. Contestants competing in a corn-nut speed eating round, quote contests, a fashion parade and more. The movie is legendary and I want the audience to show up dressed up for the ultimate Heathers celebration, ready to play with us. It will be a fully interactive night and I cannot even wait!

ME: Your Showgirls Midnight Mass presentation is far and away my personal favorite. When will this show be going down? And will there be free lapdances with every large corn, as usual?

PC: We'll be doing Showgirls on two nights-- Friday, July 31st and Saturday, August 1st. This is definitely our "signature show" and there are even people that fly into SF every year just to see Showgirls at Midnight Mass. The audience really turns the whole experience into an event, almost like you're watching a rock concert instead of a movie. If you've only seen Showgirls edited for VH1 and on TV, then you haven't seen Showgirls. And yes! We'll be offering our annual "free lapdances with every large popcorn."

ME: Linda Blair is scheduled to make an appearance at this year's Midnight Mass -- will you be interviewing her and if so, is your head simply spinning with the many questions you'd like to ask her?

PC: I'm so excited about Linda Blair appearing at our opening weekend! She's truly a film legend and yes, my head is literally spinning thinking about about it. I feel like I'm going to vomit! We'll be doing my traditional "idol worship" style show where I sit down and do an onstage interview with Ms. Blair, have audience Q&A, followed by a fan meet & greet in the lobby. We're also working on an opening number that celebrates both Roller Boogie AND The Exorcist. It will be as fucked up as it sounds, I promise!

ME: You will be closing this year's Midnight Mass season with your dear friend Elvira. What is your friendship like and what has she taught you about the cult movie scene, and also about life? What can we expect at this final show?

PC: It's surreal and dreamlike to realize I've become friends with Elvira. I worship her! I always have. Our friendship is super special to me and I think she's one of the smartest, most grounded, beautiful women in show business. I guess the biggest thing she's taught me is to not take yourself too seriously. I think her appearance at the final Midnight Mass show is going to be incredible. It's the perfect way to end 12 seasons of Midnight Mass.

ME: In addition to being a fabulous entertainer, you are also a recording artist -- what was the experience like of laying down "Peaches Christ is Gangsta" and do you have any plans to record anything else at this time?

PC: Oh, I love making music and singing live, even though I'm not that great of a singer. "Peaches Christ Is Gangsta" is best described as retarded rapping and was my attempt to do a hip-hop song. People really enjoy it. I've been working on some new songs with producer Ric Ray. He's brilliant and has been creating a bunch of new material that we'll be presenting this summer at Midnight Mass. The song we're working on for opening weekend is literally a disco inferno-- think satanic roller boogie. 

ME: I hear it is the last year Midnight Mass will be at the Bridge -- the definite end of an era. What projects will be keeping you busy from now on? What's next for you, Miss Peaches and also for Joshua?

PC: Well, it's the final season of Midnight Mass at The Bridge, which really does feel like things are coming to a close. However, I plan on continuing to do Midnight Mass shows throughout the year, just not a consecutive 8 week series-- more like one-off weekend events. I think that Peaches will continue to tour and appear places, produce midnight movie events, and hopefully be able to continue making a living as a drag thing. Joshua is going to continue working on getting movies made and out into the world. 

ME: Speaking of, the upcoming All About Evil is the feature film directorial/writing debut for Joshua Grannell and Peaches also appears in the movie. I am so proud and excited about it! Please tell us all about the film!

PC: Well, the film is currently in the final stages of post-production and we hope to have it ready for festivals this fall. It's best described as a wicked black comedy set in the world of a horror movie starring Natasha Lyonne, Cassandra Peterson, Thomas Dekker, Mink Stole, and more. I'm really proud of it and can't wait for folks to see it. And yes, even Peaches and [flawed sidekick] Martiny made their way into the movie! I think the movie is very true to the world we come from and is an homage to so many of the classic old horror movies, drive-in films, and b-movies I grew up loving. 

ME: How long did it take you to write the script?

PC: I guess it took about three years, but that was on and off again writing so it's hard to say. I was constantly having to put it on hold while working on another project, so three years sounds longer than it actually was.

ME: What was the experience like of directing a feature for the first time?

PC: It actually didn't feel like a first time because I've made a bunch of short films [click here to watch a clip from one] and have directed the stage-shows for so many years. It was different directing on such a large scale where so much had to happen so quickly, but I think that coming from the DIY underground of no-budget moviemaking and stage-shows, I was better prepared than I realized. I loved it. I can honestly say that I love making movies. It's the hardest thing I've ever done, but definitely the most fulfilling and rewarding.

ME: What about directing yourself? Musta been a bit odd.

PC: Yes. I think "odd" is a great way to describe it. And as odd as it was for me, I think it was even harder for the other actors who never knew if Peaches or Joshua was going to show up on set to direct a scene. It got confusing.

ME: I'm sure the shoot was full of them, but what was the highlight of making the movie, the shoot itself, for you?

PC: I think one of the most memorable moments was the day that Jen Taher (aka Troll Girl at Midnight Mass) flew in from NYC to do a scene with Natasha Lyonne. It was super surreal because Jen had played Natasha's part in the short version of the film I made over five years ago. It was like the marriage of these two worlds was happening in front of me and I remember being a bit overwhelmed by it. I've known Jen since I was 15 years old and having her there on the set, with so many of the people that have been part of our world was a really magical thing.

ME: I love that you filmed this movie all in San Francisco, especially at the historic Victoria Theater. How did you make this happen, when SF is notoriously difficult to film in? How important to you was the setting being here in SF?

PC: I felt strongly about filming in SF no matter what. I don't think I could have had my career in any other city and the film was designed to take place here. All of my creative collaborators are here and so many of the people that came out and worked on the movie, for free, the extras in the movie, the support from the community, could have only happened in San Francisco. I do wish that the city would make it more accessible to local filmmakers. It's amazing to see what other U.S. locales are doing to attract and nurture movies being made in their towns. We have a long way to go here.

ME: As you mentioned before, the film seems to give a tip of the hat to so many cult movies! Can you name a few of your enduring favorites here, perhaps even some that inspired you while creating your own film?

PC: Theatre Of Blood, Demons, Female Trouble, The Bad Seed, Carrie, Psycho, Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?, Peeping Tom, and more were inspiring elements that helped me create All About Evil.

ME: One of my favorite things about the film is that Patrick Bristow, Marty from Showgirls, has a plum role. How did you arrange this and does Patrick/Marty know what a fanbase he has?

PC: I think that Patrick is humble about the fact that there are people out there obsessed with him. I don't know how much he knows he's adored, but I was thrilled to get him in the movie. He actually plays the part that I played as Joshua in the short version of the film so I was extra excited to have someone so truly amazing filling my boy shoes. Patrick is a comedic genius and a master at improv. There were moments while filming where he and Natasha would go off-script and stay in character, continuing to act out a scene that wasn't ever written. I would be laughing so hard and not yell "cut" just to see how far they could take it. They're both brilliant.

ME: When is the film expected to premiere and when do you think the masses will be able to see it at last?

PC: I'm hoping that the film will premiere and that masses will be able to see it within a year. It's hard to say for sure, but that's our hope.

ME: What is your favorite film soundtrack?

PC: My favorite film soundtrack right now is Mulholland Drive. I love all the David Lynch soundtracks-- Fire Walk WIth Me is another favorite. Put them on as you're going to sleep and I promise you'll have better dreams.

ME: Just curious: what grotesque, over the top horror film death is your personal favorite, and why?

PC: I think it's the scene from the original A Nightmare On Elm Street where Tina is being slashed up while she's sleeping and her bloody body flies up onto the ceiling, getting dragged around the room while slash marks and blood pour over the walls. It's great and so totally classic. 

ME: And finally, as always, what has been your best find at Amoeba?

PC: I think most recently it was when I felt like seeing Russ Meyers' Vixen and went to Amoeba to buy it, where not only did they have multiple copies, but [they also had] an entire section dedicated to Russ Meyers DVD's. I don't know where else in town I'd be able to access something like that so quickly. I love Amoeba.

ME: Thanks so much for your time!

Canada Day -- I Passed For American -or- A Day Without a Canadian

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 1, 2009 05:00pm | Post a Comment


CANADA DAY

Today is Canada Day, a day no doubt celebrated in a manner designed not to attract too much attention. Canada is the home of the quiet revolution, after all. Most likely, their national day is marked by knowing glances. Such is the Canadian character that their national day is not marked with fireworks, guns in the air or vuvuzelas. Though Candians are stereotyped as quiet, harmless and polite pacifists who eat ketchup chips, how do we reconcile that peaceful image with the knowledge that their main export seems to be ice beer and that when they're not knocking each others teeth out in the hockey rink, they're clubbing baby seals with Neil Peart-like percussive overkill? Indeed, how much do we really know about our neighbors north of the border and the threat they pose? What harm is there in Canadians running Hollywood, you ask? They’re only doing the work Americans won’t, you say. In one three year stretch, the best actress category of the Oscars went to Canadians. Mary Pickford, Norma Shearer and Marie Dressler all took the Oscar back to Canada. That’s $1,500 of gold-plated britannium, or 1,303 loonies.

  

THE CANADIAN THREAT
If movies and TV series like Blade Runner, V, Alien Nation, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Battlestar Galactica and The Day the Earth Stood Still have taught us anything, it’s that when aliens are allowed to live in peace amongst us it’s never a good idea. Though they invariably claim to come in peace, the proper response is that they to go in pieces. Due to blissful American ignorance and our welcoming disposition toward immigrants, most of us are wholly unaware when and how many Canadians are among us. Although a phrenologist could see right through their smiling faces to their true nature, your average American when near a Canadian merely gets a tingling sensation and an inexplicable unease. With good reason too, when one becomes aware of how far reaching Canadian tentacles are in our society… *tingle* cos (Canadian over shoulder)…


CANADIAN INFILTRATION OF HOLLYWOOD AND PERVERSION OF AMERICA
Canadians have been in Hollywood since its birth, defining and exporting a Canadian-constructed view of the USA whilst funneling profits back across the border to spend on waffle production, flannel shirts and their communistic healthcare system. Consider, in modern time, the Canadian-directed Titanic, which was designed with soulless calculation and Borg-like effeciency to push America’s collective emotional buttons. As a result it became the highest grossing film of all time. Even in the early days, Canadian filmmaking has always been geared toward making their profits in America. In olden times, actors like Ruby Keeler, Florence Lawrence, Beatrice Lillie, Glenn Ford, Walter Huston, Mary Pickford, Douglas Shearer, Norma Shearer, Jay Silverheels, Fay Wray and Marie Dressler passed as Americans at the expense of our domestic acting force. They were aided from behind the scenes because those pulling the strings were also often Canadian, including Louis B. Mayer, Mack Sennet, Jack Warner, Edward Dmytryk and Arthur Hiller. In modern times, James Cameron, Paul Haggis, Norman Jewison, Lorne Michaels and Ivan Reitman have continued the dirty work begun by the cadre of the secretly-Canadian.

In the book Stardust and Shadows: Canadians in Early Hollywood, author Charles Foster recounts his discovery of the secret Canadian network, then in its initial phase of infiltration, which he learned of through Canadian director Sidney Olcott. Though a complete stranger to the members of the organization, as a fellow Canadian he was embraced merely on the basis of his national origins. Once inside, he met Walter Pidgeon, Deanna Durbin, Fifi D’Orsay and others. He also reveals that Louis B. Mayer was a racialist known to hire Canadian compatriots without audition and purely on the basis of their race.

  

CANADIAN EROSION OF AMERICAN VALUES
Firmly entrenched in our movie machine, Canadians have deliberately defined and warped our notions of ourselves. Florence “The Biograph Girl” Lawrence was our first movie star. Mary Pickford was appointed “America’s Sweetheart.” More recently, blond, Canadian, silicone cyborg Pamela Anderson has served as an example of all that is wrong with America and is one of al-qaeda’s main recruitment tools, and she’s not even one of us. What do Margot Kidder and Erica Durance and Kristen Kreuk have in common? All are Canadian and as Lois Lanes and Lana Lang, they’ve portrayed the most desirable women in the world to one as powerful as the Last Son of Krypton, who can fly around the world, reverse time and basically have his pick of most of the world’s three billion women.

  

THE SINISTER SIDE
Canadians consciously control Hollywood to make themselves seem benign, even American. Behind the scenes, they engage in all kinds of sordid, society-eroding behavior. The alcohol and drug-addled Jack Pickford's efforts to despoil our women were legendary. One of his wives, Olive Thomas, suspiciously died from poisoning. It seems her maple syrup contained lethal doses of cyanide. In an even more sinister case, Canadian Florence La Badie mothered Woodrow Wilson’s child out of wedlock as part of a larger Canadian scheme to take over the White House. Luckily, someone tampered with her brakes and she died in a car crash. Why don’t we hear about the sinister side of Canadians? Obviously because they own the media. Canadian newscaster Peter Jennings rose to the top of his field by carefully making sure to never pronounce “lieutenant” as “left-tenant.” When most foreign actors appear on late night shows, they always have some cute anecdote about the differences between their culture and ours. But you never hear a Canadian talk about their culture. Why not play up their foreignness and enjoy Americans' Canuckphilia? Why? What are they hiding? Is it any coincidence that Canadian Ryan Renolds plays the American in The Proposal who marries a Canadian played by American Sandra Bullock to get her a green card? No, they want to disable our ability to distinguish them from us.

    

FUNNY CANUCKS
Not only do Canadians try to pass as American, they also try to make us laugh. Although seemingly nonmalignant, laughter can be an insidious tool, used to disarm and distract those who we should remain wary of. Just look at this list of prominent Canadian merry-andrews:

John Candy, Dan Akroyd, Michael J. Fox, Mike Myers, Eugene Levy, Tom Green, Phil Hartman, Michael Cera, Tommy Chong, Hume Cronyn, Jim Carey, James Doohan, Dave Foley, Matt Frewer, Robert Goulet, Will Arnett, Gene Lockhart, Norm MacDonald, Howie Mandel, Rick Moranis, Catherine O'Hara, Matthew Perry, Seth Rogen, Will Sasso, Martin Short and Alan Thicke.

    

GOOD LOOKING CANUCKS
Another tool to make people drop their guard is being really, really good looking. If Canadians can’t make us laugh, they use their Dracula-like powers to seduce us to do their bidding. In moments of clarity, it turns out that many of them aren’t that good looking, but, controlling the media and Hollywood, they set our standard of beauty. If you haven’t watched Lifeforce, you should. Consider:

Sarah Polley, Adam Beach, Raymond Burr, Neve Campbell, Kim Cattrall, Hayden Christensen, Rae Dawn Chong, Elisha Cuthbert, Brendan Fraser, Ryan Gosling, Grace Park, Lorne Greene, Graham Greene, Corey Haim, Michael Ironside, Elias Koteas, Mia Kirschner, Sandra Oh, Anna Paquin, Ellen Page, Christopher Plummer, Jason Priestly, Keanu Reeves, William Shatner, Donald & Kiefer Sutherland and Jennifer & Meg Tilly.

   
  
THE INEXTRICABILITY OF CANADIANS
What can we do? The sad fact is Canadians have attached themselves to Hollywood like so many cybernetic implants that, if now removed, it would kill us. Meanwhile, the entire Canadian-based film and television industry continues to feed off the host that is mainstream America with their secretly Canadian, apparently All-American films like Porky's, Meatballs, Black Christmas, Christmas Story and Johnny Mnemonic that go to great lengths to hide anything recognizably Canadian. Canadian propaganda like True Lies and Crash remind us of our supposed racism whilst simultaneously stoking it, at the same time skillfully avoiding depictions of Canadians. Although the comically profound ignorance about Los Angeles evident in Crash seemed glaring as the sun, it was accepted as deeply insightful and accurate amongst the unfamiliar, easily-swayed and otherwise clueless. It’s like we're in The Matrix.


SNOWED BY "HOLLYWOOD NORTH"
Interestingly, lest people start wondering why they don’t make any obviously Canadian films, they created their own genre, the Northern. The prospect of watching adventure films about Mounties is so unappealing that, at minimal cost (paid for with the profits of their secretly-Canadian blockbusters), they can with factory-like precision crank out enough films to allay our suspicions, though in reality, like the tax write off films that line our clearance section, they’re not intended for human consumption, either by Americans or Canadians. Have you or anyone you know ever seen or listened to any of these films, television and radio programs?

The Riders of the Plains (1910), Flower of the North (1921), The Flame of the Yukon (1926), The Lodge in the Wilderness (1926), Tiger Rose (1929), O'Malley Rides Alone (1930), Men of the North (1930), The River's End (1931), Riders of the North (1931), Mounted Fury (1931), The Mystery Trooper (1931), Mason of the Mounted (1932), Honor of the Mounted (1932), Mckenna of the Mounted (1932), Clancy of the Mounted (1933), The Trail Beyond (1934), The Fighting Trooper (1934), Courage of the North (1934), Undercover Men (1934), Silent Code (1935), Northern Frontier (1935), Timber Terrors (1935), Wilderness Mail (1935), Fighting Shadows (1935),The Red Blood of Courage (1935), Border Brigands (1935), Code of the Mounted (1935), Trails of the Wild (1935), His Fighting Blood (1935), Skull and Crown (1936), Rose Marie (1936), Caryl of the Mountains (1936), O'Malley of the Mounted (1936), The Country Beyond (1936), Phantom Patrol (1936), Secret Patrol (1936), King of the Royal Mounted (1936), Wildcat Trooper (1936), Renfrew of the Royal Mounted (36-40), Challenge of the Yukon (39-55), Blair of the Mounties, Men in Scarlet, Renfrew of the Royal Mounted (1937), Death Goes North (1938), On the Great White Trail (1938), Heart of the North (1938), On the Great White Trail (1938), The Mysterious Pilot (1938), Fighting Mad (1939), Crashing Thru (1939), North of the Yukon (1939), Blue Montana Skies (1939), Susannah of the Mounties (1939), Outpost of the Mounties (1939), Yukon Flight (1939), Man From Montreal (1939), Murder on the Yukon (1940), Danger Ahead (1940), Sky Bandits (1940), River's End (1940), North West Mounted Police (1940), King of the Royal Mounted (1940), The Royal Mounted Patrol (1941), North of the Rockies (1942), Northwest Rangers (1942), Perils of the Royal Mounted (1942), King of the Mounties (1942), Riders of the Northwest Mounted (1943), Law of the Northwest (1943), Northern Pursuit (1943), Belle of the Yukon (1944), Northwest Trail (1945), The Royal Mounted Rides Again (1945), Neath Canadian Skies (1946), North of the Border (1946), Where the North Begins (1947), Dangers of the Canadian Mounted (1948), Northwest Stampede (1948), Trail of the Mounties (1949), Trail of the Yukon (1949), Wolf Hunters (1949), Mrs Mike (1949), Dog (1950), North of the Great Divide (1950), Call of the Klondike (1950), Gene Autry and the Mounties (1951), Yukon Manhunt (1951), Northwest Territory (1951), The Wild North (1952), Border Saddlemates (1952), Yukon Gold (1952), Pony Soldier (1952), Blue Canadian Rockies (1952), Fangs of the Arctic (1953), Fort Vengeance (1953), Northern Patrol (1953), Canadian Mounties vs Atomic Invaders (1953), Gunfighters of the Northwest (1954), Yukon Vengeance (1954), Rose Marie (1954), Saskatchewan (1954), Perils of the Wilderness (1956), The Canadians (1961), Alien Thunder (1974)

Belle of the Yukonblue canadian rockiescaryl of the mountiescode of the mountedfighting madfighting trooper

honor of the mountedking of the mountedmason of the mountedmrs. mikenorthern frontiernorth of the great divide

northwest trailphantom patrolred blood of couragerenfrew of the royal mountedriders of the plainsriders of the north

rose marieroyal mounted rides againsilent codeskull and crownsky banditssussanah of the mounties

the trail beyondtrail of the mountieswilderness mailyukon flight

I didn’t think so. But, as you can see, some are on DVD. Maybe I'll watch one. I'll have to think aboat it.


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Let's Make it a Movie Night: Part II

Posted by Smiles Davis, July 1, 2009 02:22pm | Post a Comment
I’ve been sick in bed with worst pathogen known to man for the past – feels like years – week and half. I haven’t had the energy to do more than fluff my pillow and change my position every hour or so to prevent from getting bed sores. Well, it’s not that serious, but telling myself that helps me feel better about putting my significant other through brutal torture – you’d swear with the extra load I’ve put on him, he was training for a maid marathon at the Holiday Inn. With all this down time on my hands, the only thing to do to occupy my time and prevent insanity from fully setting in is watch movies. And boy, do I have plenty. Yesterday alone I think I watched some 12 flicks. Most of them were documentaries; some were hit, some were miss.

When it comes to movies, a person can tell whether a flick is going to be of interest to them or not within the first couple of minutes or so. On several occasions, I pressed the eject button before I got past the opening credits. Then, on the flip side, some of the flicks were worth another watch, a tour through the special features, and a word with the director and/or cast members. Well, I’ve made a list of the ones that were most entertaining to watch and that forced me to take a second look. So, here (in no particular order) are my top 5 documentaries, for now:
 Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser
Directed by Charlotte Zwerin
One reason to love this film other than Thelonious Monk is the exceptional footage quality.
 
The Kid Stays in the Picture
Directed by Nanette Burstein and Brett Morgen
I don't know how much of this story is actually true, but Robert Evans is one heck of a story teller.


Baraka
Directed by Ron Fricke
There are so many reasons to love this film. Visually breathtaking. 

 

Ken Burns – Jazz
Directed by Ken Burns
One reason to love this film other than the superb facts is that you can appreciate it even if you're not really into jazz.
 
Man on Wire
Directed by James Marsh
I love this film! Courageous, ambitious, and absolutely extraordinary.

'Till next time... chew the corners off

Either Dead or Married: All my celebrity boyfriends are pretty much taken....

Posted by Kells, July 1, 2009 02:09pm | Post a Comment

Anyone who's seen the recent Vanity Fair featuring a cover and interview/photo spread with Johnny Depp knows that his "celebrity boyfriend" cherishability index has increased exponentially with age. He is, however, a hopelessly taken family man, what with his kids, his mother-of-my-kids girlfriend, French chanteuse Vanessa Paradis, and his very own private Caribbean island escape. But the facts have never swayed my esteem for the Depp as a go-to example of male perfection. Indeed, given the average age in my stable of celebrity boyfriends, Johnny Depp has yet to fully bloom. 

I remember my first celebrity boyfriend fondly. His name was Lance. He wore a blue turtleneck and brown suede jacket when he wasn't in uniform "defending the universe" by piloting the Red Lion as second in command of the team-comprised mega-robot Voltron. The commanding officer, Keith, a very anime-handsome, if not overly serious young lad who displayed attractively obvious affection for Princess Aurora, always tempted my gaze, but then Lance's witty remarks and penchant for daring maneuvers always won me back. I never cared that Lance was a mere sketch brought to cartoon life. Besides, the very peak of hotness at that time belonged to another animated hot guy, as A-Ha's hit music video for their single "Take On Me" dominated the rotation on MTV and VH1. I mean, who can deny the freaky-deaky rotoscope, "don't get too close to my fantasy" appeal of Norwegian lead singer Morten Harket, on or off paper? 

My teenage celeBFs pretty much followed whatever I was into at the time, from "Hollywood" rockstars like Poison drummer Rikki Rockett (and Stephen "Patch" Nichols of Days Of Our Lives fame, by visual proxy) to sundry punk-rock deadbeats like Lee Ving and interstellar heart breakers like Capt. Jean-Luc Picard of the USS Enterprise-D, as played by the now, forever and always celebrity boyfriend-of-mine Patrick Stewart on the hit sci-fi TV series Star Trek: The Next Generation. In fact, my attachment to Patrick Stewart has strengthened over the years to such a heightened tension that makes part of me believe that he sings songs like this one just for me:



My attachment to Patrick Stewart sparked a realization in me that I am attracted to bald men, and not just any bald man, mind you --- sorry, Telly. No, the kind of guy I fancy has to be a guy who could flaunt a full coiffure, but gives a dashingly handsome face without it. He must also have a way of moving that melts knee-joints and a voice that induces mild hallucinations of love. Naturally, after many seasons spent fawning over Patrick, my attentions were exceedingly diverted by the work of the late, great Yul Brynner.

Oh, Yul --- what a man! An all singing, dancing, acting Russian-Swiss-Mongolian mix of sex, pecs and flawless silhouettes. He was an avid photographer (his work is quite good), a noted chain-smoker (remember that ACS public service announcement he made in the eighties?) and he even penned a few books (The Yul Brynner Cookbook: Food Fit for the King and You is a favorite title). Though now gone from this world, the man has won my heart many times over. Sure, not all of his films are great, but the eye-candy factor alone makes many a stinker worth the time and, as Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus knows, some of Yul's films have only gotten better with time (as suggested by the song "Jo Jo's Jacket" on Malkmus' self-titled debut solo album). Yes, the robotic gunslinger Yul plays in Westworld (1973, Michael Crichton) blends just the right amount of old Hollywood glamour, spaghetti western machismo and 70's era, Sci-Fi mumbo-jumbo to make it one for the ages. Watch it as a trilogy, book-ended with Logan's Run (1976) and Soylent Green (1973) to complete the recipe. 

This look back at my celebrity boyfriends through the ages was sparked by the recent news that one of the last single men in my mental male-harem, a self-proclaimed bachelor playboy, has finally, somewhat secretly, married. Hitoshi Matsumoto, a Japanese comedian commonly known by his cutesy nickname, "Mattchan," and his celebrity status as exactly one half of Japan's most famous and wildly successful manzai comic duo, is only just gaining notice here in the States, thanks to the domestic release of his film Dainipponjin, or Big Man Japan, which he wrote, directed and stars in. The film has been widely marketed as a sort of This Is Spinal Tap meets Godzilla-caliber monster movie and I agree with this neatly wrapped description. Matsumoto plays a super hero charged with keeping Japan safe from all manner of ridiculous, XL-sized (and sometimes X rated) creatures in the mockumentary-style film that paints a pathetic picture of one messed-up, misunderstood loser of a dude. It's funny, it's weird and well worth watching if not for the gut-busting turn of events in the end. The CG will surely be dismissed as "slapdash" by nerdy perfectionists, but I believe the shoddy look is all part of the charm that makes this movie laugh-at-able. Besides, like I said, like, two sentences ago, stay with it to the end --- nothing can prepare you for what's in store. It's not often that I get the feeling that I've been "pantsed" by a movie; viewing Big Man Japan in its entirety is a major pants-ing in the making, make no mistake about it. And as for Mattchan's sudden marriage, well, another one bites the dust. I'm not obsessed, I just love his guts (and his baldy looks).

KARL MALDEN (THE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO) DIES AT AGE 97

Posted by Billyjam, July 1, 2009 01:34pm | Post a Comment

Academy Award winning "everyman" actor Karl Malden died earlier today at his home in Los Angeles. He was 97 years of age. During his long acting career, Malden played roles in TV, movies, and theater, but is probably most often identified for his role as Lt. Mike Stone (opposite Michael Douglas) in the popular seventies TV series The Streets Of San Francisco (clip above) as well as for being the spokesperson for American Express travelers checks in a series of TV commercials in that same decade. Read the full obit here.