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The Ritual Madness That is Mardi Gras at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Amoebite, February 24, 2012 12:39pm | Post a Comment
ALLIGATOR PAH FILEZ GUMBO! TCHOUPITOULAS WHO DAT BOOGALEE? ONCE AGAIN AMOEBA MUSIC MOS’SCOCIOUS, FIXIN’ TO PASS A GOOD TIME DOWN BY THAT OLE BAYOU LOS ANGELEEZ. TRUE DAT, YAT?
Fat Tuesday at AmoebaFrom Pan’s lips to our ears, these words of Cajun sacramental blessing ring out through the eons of celebration here at the big easy Amoeba Music, here in the City that Public Transport Forgot. Once again, winter with its cares and sub-70 temps has crept away on little cat feet, Spring has sprung, and as the great mudball we call Terra hurtles in its gyre towards the sun, we mark the turning of the season with a grand fais do-do that is suitable to the season. Before the ashes of Wednesday mark thy brow, toodle thyself down to the great creaking music emporium where the pagans await thee, ready to robe mask and bead thee, wanting only to draw thee into their voodoo jamboree of horns, floats, gumbo and confetti, shiny green gold and purple mylar waving in the southland breeze. Lose thyself in epic indulgence before the self-denial of Lent, followed of course by the rebirth of Bacchus X. Dionysus Ludo, who shall lead us prancing sun-roasted into Summer! It’s Mardi Gras at Amoeba -- ritual madness awaits!
Fat Tuesday at Amoeba
Said weary mylar was resurrected as always from the depths of the Amoeba warehouse, and let shine once more. The Amoeba parish was coated in the sacred colours of purple gold and green, bedecked with more layers of party store finery than a muffuletta sandwitch or an etouffe. We immersed ourselves in the funky backwater sounds of Dr. John, Professor Longhair, the Wild Tchoupitoulas, Preservation Hall, the Meters, Fats Domino, and Lee Dorsey. We lashed ourselves with the fennel rod, donned the goatskin, drank the day’s wine and prepared ourselves for rejoicing!

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What are the Mardi Gras Indians? (A Quick History)

Posted by Amoebite, February 23, 2011 05:23pm | Post a Comment
Since Mardi Gras is right around the corner, and we are talking about Black History---it seems fitting toMardi Gras Indians talk a little about the Mardi Gras Indian tradition in New Orleans and Louisiana. Still thriving, the Mardi Gras Indians are an important part of the Mardi Gras tradition and are said to have originated from the alliance between runaway slaves and the American Indians who provided a safe haven. It is also said that the African and Indian cultures found a natural affinity for each other as oppressed minorities within the early American settlements. The "Indians" incorporated African and Native American traditions in dress and rituals. Later on when Caribbean influences came to New Orleans, that flavor was also added to the mix.

The tribes of "Black Indians" which grew in Southwest Louisiana were defined by region and neighborhood and they became very territorial. To protect their status as the "reigning" Tribe in the neighborhood very often meant violent showdowns. In the early days of the 20th century, the focus of the "tribes" became less about territory and "turf wars" and became more about status defined by the better and more colorful suits and headdresses, as well as the songs and dances. The "battles" that the various tribes would do in the neighborhooMardi Gras Indiansds were about garnering respect for the amazing costumes and the dancing.

It was an ominous thing to see a group of Indians outside about to do battle with each other, and generally folks ran away. But nowadays, people flock to see the colors and hear the chanting, and to watch the "Big Chiefs" do battle. A Mardi Gras Indian Chief's suit can weigh up to 150 pounds, and he makes his suit each year with the help of his family. The tribe works all year to create a BETTER suit than the year before.

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