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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With White Fence

Posted by Amoebite, September 24, 2014 12:43pm | Post a Comment

White Fence

Tim Presley (no relation to Elvis Presley) first hit the music scene as "Timmy Stardust," playing guitar for American hardcore band The Nerve Agents. Known for their chaotic and sometimes violent live performances, The Nerve Agents were a spectacle to behold. After four productive years together, the Agents disbanded. Subsequently, Tim Presley and Nerve Agents drummer Andy Granelli founded the psychedelic rock band Darker My Love. Several years into Darker My Love, Presley started recording songs in his White Fenceapartment using lo-fi audio gear to capture ideas that would eventually be released under the White Fence moniker. Presley has since managed to compile an impressive solo catalog including Hair (Drag City), the 2012 collaboration with the golden child of garage pop, Ty Segall. After years of recording his music on a 4-track home recorder, Presley made the jump to an actual studio housed in Ty Segall's garage. Despite utilizing a more modern setup, the White Fence aesthetic remains intact. His latest offering, For The Recently Found Innocent (Drag City, 2014), is packed with gems and the White Fence pop style of songwriting is stronger than ever. Presely has a knack for crafting catchy songs that become the soundtrack to people's lives, and from what we've seen so far he has a lot more to share. Tim Presely has definitely become a mainstay in the Los Angeles psychedelic garage rock scene. 

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These Streets of Hers: Jessica Pratt is All But Owning Her Home Turf

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, December 14, 2012 07:10pm | Post a Comment
jessica pratt brith records tim presley white fence san francisco folk singer songwriter debut lp vinly record 2012 jp stevie nicks private press retro canyon joni mitchell joanna newsom interest
San Francisco songstress Jessica Pratt is blowing up. She's on fire. She's on fire and blowing up. Since her debut album of lush, hand-picked folk melodies dropped a just few months ago demand for Jessica's debut, simply titled JP, has become as difficult to keep up with as the multitude of glowing reviews surfacing all over the interwebs lauding Ms. Pratt's ability to make everyone mistake her bewitching, home-brewed folkways for that of retro private press obscurities. If you think this isn't going to be yet another reverent review let me get right to the point: believe the hype.
jessica pratt
Like so many jewels that cannot stay buried in the deep forever, Jessica Pratt has risen above the morass of the San Francisco music scene like a diamond atoll emerging from an ocean of acts drowning in their own in reverb, reciprocity, and relative "esoteric" influences. A momentous feat for any solo musician, let alone any woman, struggling just to tread water in the threadbare, barely-there music industry these days.

That Tim (White Fence) Presley launched his label Birth Records just to put Ms. Pratt's record out speaks to the immediacy of her music. It's a sound that cannot help but conjure familiar feelings upon first listen (for any vinyl junkie anyway), and the comparisons are flying. Presley himself has oft been quoted as saying she brings to mind  "Stevie Nicks singing over David Crosby demos" and others have pointed to the way in which her vocal stylings bait and switch Nicks, Joanna Newsom, and Karen Dalton among many others. While we're at it, I'd like suggest the inclusion of Dolly Parton to pinch hit in this approximation game as the fluttery trails Pratt punctuates her lyrical lines with in songs like "Hollywood" and "Half Twain the Jesse" resemble Dolly's vocal filigree.
jessica pratt
I have to admit, however, I find all these comparisons tacky and terribly trapped-in-the-90's buzzbin in the sense that any woman that ever flaunted a decidedly "unique" voice back then was appraised by nineties alterna-trinity: Björk/Tori Amos/P.J. Harvey. For me, it's offensive to struggle to assay the impression of a fresh voice with those we already know and love because burdens the emerging artist with the luster, or shadow, of an others' work. While I cannot deny the correlation of Jessica Pratt's magic to that Newsom or any other would-be contemporary, it should be noted that as far as patently "unique" voices go s. Pratt's is just about as unequivocal as they come.

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