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Music History Monday: December 15

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 15, 2014 10:46am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 15, 1967The Who Sell Out, the third studio album by The Who, is released. Produced by Kit Lambert, it is recorded at Talentmasters Studios in New York City; IBC Studios, Pye Studios, De Lane Lea Studios, CBS Studios, and Kingsway Studios in London; and Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles from May - November of 1967. The band's third release is a concept album that includes songs interspersed with fake commercials and public service announcements, mimicking the British pirate radio station Radio London. The band will actually be sued by a number of companies whose real products are parodied on the album. It will spin off the classic "I Can See For Miles" (#10 UK, #9 US Pop). Original pressings of the album include a short instrumental cut in the runout groove. The first 1,000 copies of the original stereo and first 500 mono copies of the UK LP will come packaged with a psychedelic poster of a butterfly painted by artist Adrian George. The art had originally been intended for the album's cover, but is rejected. The rarity of these initial pressings have sold in recent years for more than $1,000 each or more on the collector's market. The album is reissued on CD in 1995 with ten additional bonus tracks including outtakes not included in the original release. It is reissued again in 2009 as a two CD Deluxe Edition featuring the original mono and stereo versions of the album, with 28 bonus tracks.The Who Sell Out will peak at number 13 on the UK album chart and number f48 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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One album wonders: John's Children's Orgasm

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 3, 2014 10:20am | Post a Comment
 JOHN'S CHILDREN - ORGASM (recorded 1967, released 1971) 

John's Children - Orgasm

Today the band John's Children, when remembered at all, are best remembered for two things: one, for having briefly included within their ranks a pre-T. Rex Marc Bolan and two, for their calculatedly outrageousness and provocative live performances. Both overshadow the fact that they also made some quite enjoyable music, including a sole LP recorded before Bolan joined but released long after he'd left.


*****


The story of John's Children begins in 1965 in Great Bookham, where drummer Chris Townson, guitarist Geoff McClelland, harmonica-player Andy Ellison, and singer Louis Grooner played in a band called The Clockwork Onions. With changing times and line-ups came changing names and The Clockwork Onions became The Few. After the departure of keyboardist Chris Dawsett The Few became The Silence, who were Andy Ellison, Chris Townson, Geoff McClelland, and John Hewlett. The Silence were described by Yardbirds manager Simon Napier-Bell as “positively the worst group I'd ever seen” and not surprisingly he insisted on becoming their manager. 


Napier-Bell changed The Silence's name to John's Children. The band -- actually a group of session musicians -- recorded John's Children's first single, “The Love I Thought I'd Found” b/w “Strange Affair," which was released in 1966. The original title of the A-side was "Smashed Blocked" but a name change was necessitated at home because it was deemed offensive. Far from Surrey the single found a receptive audience (where it was released with its original name) in Florida and California -- two American states both known for their production and appreciation of weird, unpolished garage rock

Music History Monday: October 13

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 13, 2014 10:33am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 13, 1965 - "My Generation", the third single by The Who, is recorded. Written by Pete Townshend, he will take inspration from singer Mose Allison's song "Young Man Blues." The song's crowning touch will be provided by singer Roger Daltrey stuttering like a one of the band's mod fans on speed. Produced by Shel Talmy, the band will record the song at IBC Studios in London. Recorded on three track tape, the final mono master will feature a second guitar part overdubbed by Townshend (direct to tape while being mixed) that features the song's trademark feedback. Released in the UK on November 5, 1965 (US release date is November 20, 1965), the song is an instant smash in their home country peaking at #2. Though it will only peak at #74 in the US, it will go on to be one to be one of most influential rock singles of all time. "My Generation" is now part of the The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999. In 2002, "My Generation" will be mixed into true stereo for the first time from the original multi-track tape (though it is missing the additional guitar overdub from the mono mix), which has been in the possession of Shel Talmy, and appears on the Deluxe Edition of My Generation.
 

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Music History Monday: August 18

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 18, 2014 10:42am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: August 18, 1956 - "Don't Be Cruel/Hound Dog" by Elvis Presley hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for 11 weeks. It is third chart-topping single for Presley. Penned by songwriter Otis Blackwell ("Great Balls Of Fire," "All Shook Up," "Return To Sender"), the track is recorded at RCA Studios in New York on July 2, 1956, with the master version being the 28th take. The single is released 11 days later on July 13th and is an immediate smash. Technically the B-side of the single, it will be listed along with "Hound Dog" beginning the week of August 11,1956 when it reaches #2, then topping the chart the following week. The double A-sided single's run at the top of the charts is unprecedented in the era. The record will remain unbroken until 1992 when "End Of The Road" by Boyz II Men holds the number one spot for 13 weeks. "Don't Be Cruel" is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA and is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2002.
 


On this day in music history: August 18, 1978Who Are You, the eighth studio album by The Who is released. Produced by The Who, Jon Astley, and Glyn Johns, it is recorded at Rampart Studios in Battersea, London; Olympic Studios and RAK Studios in St. John's Wood, London; and Pete Townshend's home studio in Going-on-Thames, London from October 1977 - April 1978. Issued three years after their last studio album The Who By Numbers, it will be the final album to feature original drummer Keith Moon, who will die of an accidental drug overdose just three weeks after its release. It will spin off two singles including "Trick Of The Light" and the title track (#14 Pop). In 1996, the album will be remixed and remastered (by Jon Astley), with the reissue containing five bonus tracks. Who Are You will peak at number two on the Billboard Top 200, number six on the UK album chart, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: December 9

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 9, 2013 08:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 9, 1962Meet The Supremes, the debut album by The Supremes is released. Produced by Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Raynoma Liles, it is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit from October 1960 - September 1962. It features the first four singles released by the group during 1961 and 1962. All fared poorly on the charts in spite of the company's best writers and producers efforts to come up with a hit single for the group. In the wake of the group's breakthrough success with their second full-length Where Did Our Love Go?, the album will be reissued in early 1965 (originally issued in mono, it is remixed in true stereo with different cover artwork). Original copies of Meet The Supremes are among the rarest of the early Motown LPs and command up to $500 for a near mint copy today.
 


On this day in music history: December 9, 1966Fresh Cream,  the debut album by Cream is released. Produced by Robert Stigwood, it is recorded at Rayrik Studios and Ryemuse Studios in London from July - October 1966. The first release by the British rock supergroup is also the first release on manager/producer Stigwood's newly formed Reaction Records in the UK, and will be released by Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco in the US. Featuring a mixture of covers and original material, it will include some of the band's signature songs including their first single "I Feel Free" and the blues standards "I'm So Glad," "Spoonful," and "Rollin' And Tumblin'." The original US LP pressings will feature a different track sequence than the UK version, exchanging "Spoonful" for "I Feel Free," which had been issued as a stand alone single in the UK. Fresh Cream will peak at #6 on the UK album chart, and #39 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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