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Music History Monday: December 9

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 9, 2013 08:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 9, 1962Meet The Supremes, the debut album by The Supremes is released. Produced by Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Raynoma Liles, it is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit from October 1960 - September 1962. It features the first four singles released by the group during 1961 and 1962. All fared poorly on the charts in spite of the company's best writers and producers efforts to come up with a hit single for the group. In the wake of the group's breakthrough success with their second full-length Where Did Our Love Go?, the album will be reissued in early 1965 (originally issued in mono, it is remixed in true stereo with different cover artwork). Original copies of Meet The Supremes are among the rarest of the early Motown LPs and command up to $500 for a near mint copy today.
 


On this day in music history: December 9, 1966Fresh Cream,  the debut album by Cream is released. Produced by Robert Stigwood, it is recorded at Rayrik Studios and Ryemuse Studios in London from July - October 1966. The first release by the British rock supergroup is also the first release on manager/producer Stigwood's newly formed Reaction Records in the UK, and will be released by Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco in the US. Featuring a mixture of covers and original material, it will include some of the band's signature songs including their first single "I Feel Free" and the blues standards "I'm So Glad," "Spoonful," and "Rollin' And Tumblin'." The original US LP pressings will feature a different track sequence than the UK version, exchanging "Spoonful" for "I Feel Free," which had been issued as a stand alone single in the UK. Fresh Cream will peak at #6 on the UK album chart, and #39 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: October 28

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 28, 2013 12:12pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 28, 1964 - The T.A.M.I. Show (Teen Age Music International) is filmed in Santa Monica. Produced by Bill Sargeant and directed by Steve Binder (Elvis '68 Comeback Special), it is filmed over two days (October 28 - 29, 1964) at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. The concerts feature performances by The Barbarians, The Beach Boys, Chuck Berry, Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, Lesley Gore, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, Gerry & The Pacemakers, and The Rolling Stones. The unquestionable highlight of the film is a showstopping performance by James Brown & The Famous Flames. Shot with Electronovision television cameras (a early predecessor to high definition television), the best footage from the two nights will be edited into the final film, which is released theatrically on December 29, 1964. The T.A.M.I. Show will be seen as a seminal event in Rock & Roll history, which will be further confirmed when it is named to The National Film Registry by the U.S. Library Of Congress in 2006. Rarely seen in complete form since its original release (with the exception of video tape bootlegs), Dick Clark Productions will acquire the rights to the film. After numerous delays, it will finally be restored and released in its entirety on DVD by Shout Factory in March of 2010.
 

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Music History Monday: March 11

Posted by Jeff Harris, March 11, 2013 11:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: March 11, 1957 - R&B singer/songwriter Cheryl Lynn (born Lynda Cheryl Smith in Los Angeles, CA). Happy 56th Birthday, Cheryl!!



On this day in music history: March 11, 1960 - "Because They're Young" by Duane Eddy is recorded. Written by Don Costa, Wally Gold, Aaron Schroeder, and produced by Lee Hazlewood (Nancy Sinatra, Sanford Clark), it is the theme song to the film starring Dick Clark, Tuesday Weld, Doug McClure, and James Darren. The film is about a high school teacher (played by Clark), who tries to make a difference in the lives of his students. Eddy will also have a cameo role in the film. Released as a single in May, the song will become the guitarists' biggest hit in the US, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 on July 4th. Co-star James Darren will later record a vocal version of the originally instrumental theme after Duane Eddy's version becomes a hit.
 


On this day in music history: March 11, 1967 - "Love Is Here And Now You're Gone" by The Supremes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week, also topping the R&B singles chart for two weeks on the same date. Written by Brian and Eddie Holland and Lamont Dozier, it is the ninth pop and fourth R&B chart topper for the superstar Motown vocal trio. Songwriter and co-producer Eddie Holland will come up with the basic idea for the song, writing the lyrics about a relationship in the throes of breaking up. Impressed by Diana Ross' emotive speaking voice, HDH will structure the song with passages where she'll deliver brief lines of dialogue before breaking into the songs' chorus. The basic track will be one of the Motown singles of the period not to be cut at the label's main studio (dubbed "Studio A") in Detroit. The producers will have members of The Funk Brothers fly out to Hollywood where they are working with film composer Frank DeVol (The Brady Bunch) on music for the film The Happening (starring Anthony Quinn). Recorded on the scoring stage at Columbia Studios on August 12, 1966, the Motown rhythm section is augmented with a full orchestra (arranged by Gene Page) featuring bassist James Jamerson playing upright bass. Jamerson will later overdub an electric bass part on the track in Detroit on September 22nd, with The Supremes adding their vocals on November 13th. Issued as the follow up to the groups' previous chart topper "You Keep Me Hangin' On" on January 11, 1967, it is the second single from The Supremes Sing "Holland - Dozier - Holland. Entering the Hot 100 at #47 on January 28th, it will shoot to the top six weeks later.
 

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Music History Monday: November 19

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 19, 2012 11:34am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Music History MondayOn this day in music history: November 19, 1966 - "Knock On Wood" by Eddie Floyd hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for one week, also peaking at #28 on the Hot 100 on December 10th. Written by Eddie Floyd and Steve Cropper, It will be the biggest hit for Alabama-born soul singer. The song is actually recorded in the Summer of 1965 (with Booker T. & The MG's, Isaac Hayes on piano, and The Mar-Keys' horn section), but is held back from release by Stax Records president Jim Stewart when he believes that it is too similar to Wilson Pickett's "In The Midnight Hour." The record will actually experience resistance from radio upon its release, failing to receive any airplay initially. Stax Records' head Al Bell will hit upon the idea of Floyd performing live in an area where he has a strong fanbase. Washington DC will be city that is chosen. The ploy will work, with the single breaking on radio stations in the DC and Baltimore area. From there, the record will go national. Over the years, "Knock On Wood" will be covered by a number of artists Ike & Tina Turner, David Bowie, and Eric Clapton. Singer Amii Stewart's disco rendering of the song will become a worldwide hit, hitting #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in April of 1979.
 

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Music History Monday: September 3

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 3, 2012 02:11pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 3, 1966 - "Sunshine Superman" by Donovan hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by Donovan Leitch, it is the biggest US chart single for the Scottish-born singer/songwriter. The songs' UK release will be delayed by several months due to a contractual dispute with Pye Records. It also features future Led Zeppelin members Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones providing instrumental support. The record marks a major turning point in Donovan's career, which will see him moving away from his earlier folk oriented material that led the young singer/songwriter to be compared to Bob Dylan by the British press. The two will actually meet in 1965 during Dylan's now-legendary tour of the UK captured in the documentary film Don't Look Back and become friends.


On this day in music history: September 3, 1966 - "You Can't Hurry Love" by The Supremes hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for two weeks, also topping the Hot 100 on September 10th for two weeks. Written by Brian Holland, Eddie Holland, and Lamont Dozier, it is the Detroit-based girl groups' second R&B chart topper and their seventh to reach #1 on the pop charts in just over two years. Following a period when three of the groups' singles either fail to reach number one or miss the top ten (after having six chart topping singles, so far), Motown founder Berry Gordy issues an edict that they will not release anything but #1 hits on their most successful act. The Supremes' writing and production team of Holland-Dozier-Holland immediately set about making that happen. HDH will take inspiration from one of their earlier Supremes hits when they begin writing. Initially they begin by playing around with the chord sequence from "Come See About Me," but it eventually evolves into something completely different. The basic track for "You Can't Hurry Love" is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit on June 11, 1966 with The Funk Brothers providing musical support. The Supremes will record their vocals on July 5th. Released on July 25th, it will quickly race up the pop and R&B charts, beginning the groups second consecutive streak of number one hits where their next four releases will all hit #1 on the Hot 100, three of them also topping the R&B singles chart.

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