New "What's in My Bag?" Episode with Mary Wilson, Freda Payne & Linda Clifford

Posted by Amoebite, April 11, 2016 05:30pm | Post a Comment

Mary Wilson, Freda Payne & Linda Clifford What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Amoeba Hollywood had the honor of having not just one, not just two, but three legends of American soul and R&B visit the store recently: Mary Wilson, Freda Payne and Linda Clifford.

Mary Wilson is a founding member of a little group you may have heard of called The Supremes, in which she sang on twelve #1 hits, and went on to a successful solo career starting in the late '70s. 

Best known for her chart-topping 1970 single "Band of Gold," Freda Payne is a jazz and soul singer, actress, and talk show host who has worked with legends like Quincy Jones and Pearl Bailey.

Former Miss New York State, Linda Clifford started her entertainment career as an actress and moved into music by fronting a jazz trio before switching to R&B, which led her to sign with Paramount Records and Curtis Mayfield's Curtom Records. 

As you could imagine, between the three singers some great vocalists turned up in their Amoeba bags, including Nancy Wilson and Thelma Houston whose album Sunshower Clifford had just learned of the night before from Payne. Wilson and Payne both picked up the same collection of Antonio Carlos Jobim tunes, and Clifford grabbed two Shirley Horn collections. Mary Wilson also talks about getting into the blues again because of none other than British rocker Bill Wyman of The Rolling Stones. As she says, "our parents grew up with it...we were into rock n' roll."

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Christmas in Japan

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, December 17, 2008 04:23pm | Post a Comment
santa claus is coming to town with winter warlock
A few nights ago while watching an old VHS copy of Santa Claus is Coming to Town I began to wonder about this whole Christmas thing. The legend of Santa Claus, according to this stop-action, puppet laden, mind-bending slice of classic holiday TV programming, is a bit dodgy in parts and down-right unsettling as a whole (and hilarious when paired with the right kind of holiday spirits). How on earth did a story like this, the story of Santa Claus, ever so increase in popularity as to reach the mutated, lofty, legendary status it entertains today? It boggles the mind! But then Christmas is just plain weird and, ultimately, up for interpretation and reinterpretation given the varied spiritual, social, economic, geographic and educational contexts that embgodzilla christmas in japanrace it. That said, I'd like to explore Christmas the way the Japanese do it, as I believe it is a phenomenon that most Americans know little of unless you've had the pleasure of spending Christmas (or the New Year's festivities for the matter) in the biggest little archipelago on the Pacific Rim. 

Recently I asked one of my good buddies, an ex-pat who lives and works in Japan, if he'd be coming back to the good ol' U. S. of A. come Christmas. Sadly he won't be, but he assured me that his absence wouldn't hinder his warm wishes and memories of spending christmas in japan colonel sanders as santa clausthe holidays stateside with friends (and family too I suppose). One thing that he disclosed that has been sticking in my head is, "I have to fend off the almost daily, 'What's Christmas really like in the States?' question." What I'd give to know how he chooses to answer this question; "Oh it's like a weeks-long shopping fiasco that claims the sanity and lives of the over-worked and underpaid temporary workers of my country," I imagine him explaining to a wide eyed and wistful looking クリスマス enthusiast before losing their interest by then expounding upon the glory of salt-cured ham, home-made egg nog and football. I know my friends in Japan are missing out on some of the traditions and seasonal cheer they enjoyed growing up with, but if you ask me, they've got plenty to be merry about being so far away for the holidays. 

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