Amoeblog

10 Bands We'd Like to See Reunite

Posted by Billy Gil, January 29, 2014 11:11am | Post a Comment

Two of our favorite bands of all time — OutKast and Slowdiveare officially reuniting. OutKast announced it a couple weeks back, with news that the Southern rap legends will headline Coachella and play Governernor’s Ball in New York, though it seems likely we’ll see another Big Boi album before a new OutKast album (and we’re OK with that!). Meanwhile, shoegaze titans Slowdive yesterday confirmed rumors (that they themselves flamed) that they’d reunite, playing Primavera in Barcelona in May and “a couple of gigs,” including a show at Village Underground in London May 19 (better book your tickets now!), in order to raise funds for a new LP.

With those two reunions locked down, we thought we’d turn our attention from bands we liked that reunited to bands we’d like to see reunite.

Talking Heads

talking heads amoebaThis one seems a no-brainer. They exactly been quiet since they first broke up in 1991, from briefly “reuniting” onstage in 2002 to play three songs for their Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, to David Byrnes solo career (including a one-off album with St. Vincent), to the other members’ activity, including The Heads and Tom Tom Club. And the band seems more popular and prescient than ever. So, everyone’s still alive and working.

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Music History Monday: August 26

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 26, 2013 02:13pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: August 26, 1964 - "You Really Got Me" by The Kinks is released. Written by Ray Davies, it is the first major hit for the North London based rock band. Having released two previous singles that fail to make an impact, The Kinks will be pressured by their UK label Pye Records to deliver a hit record or be dropped from the label. After Davies writes "You Really Got Me," he and the band will try the song with a number of different arrangements before finding the right one. The Kinks will record the track with American producer Shel Talmy at IBC Studios in London in July 1964. The single's trademark distorted guitar sound is achieved by lead guitarist Dave Davies slicing the speaker cone of his guitar amp with a razor blade. It will also be one of the first rock songs to feature power chords (perfect 5ths and octaves) rather than major or minor triads. This will lay the template for the hard rock and heavy metal music genres that will follow in the years to come. The song will hit #1 in the UK and #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 28th. One of the records that will help define the '60s "British Invasion" era, "You Really Got Me" is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999.
 


On this day in music history: August 26, 1967 - "Ode To Billie Joe" by Bobbie Gentry hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks. Written by Bobbie Gentry (birth name Roberta Lee Streeter), it will be the biggest hit for the Mississippi born singer/songwriter. The cryptic story song about a young man committing suicide for unknown reasons is an immediate smash. Recorded at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood on July 10, 1967, the track will be completed in less than an hour of studio time. Arranger Jimmie Haskell will add the song's crowning touch by overdubbing violins and cellos to the spare arrangement. The unedited version runs over seven minutes and it pared down to just over four minutes. Originally issued as the B-side to her debut single "Mississippi Delta," DJs will very quickly favor the flipside. "Ode To Billie Joe" will enter the Hot 100 at #71 on August 5, 1967 and it will rocket to the top of the chart just three weeks later. The song will also send Gentry's album (also titled Ode To Billie Joe) to #1 for five weeks (unseating The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"), and winning her two Grammy Awards for Best New Artist and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.
 

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Music History Monday: June 10

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 10, 2013 10:03am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: June 10, 1972 - "The Candy Man" by Sammy Davis, Jr. hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for two weeks on May 20th. Written by Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse, it is the biggest hit for the Harlem, NY-born singer, actor, and entertainer. The song is originally written for the film Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory in 1971. The original version of the song is sung by actor Aubrey Woods in the film. Entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. will record "The Candy Man" shortly after the release of Willy Wonka and is included on his album Sammy Davis Jr. Now! The track is produced by MGM Records president Mike Curb, legendary producer/arranger Don Costa, and Michael Viner (Incredible Bongo Band). It also features background vocals by the Mike Curb Congregation who had previously recorded it before Davis, but failed to chart with it. Entering the Hot 100 at #97 on March 11, 1972, it will climb to the top of the chart thirteen weeks later. "The Candy Man" will be certified Gold in the US by the RIAA, selling over two million copies in the US.
 

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The Art Of The LP Cover- Playing Cards

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 22, 2012 02:10pm | Post a Comment


Saluting The Early Kinks (1964 - 1966) - The British Band That Could Do No Wrong

Posted by Billyjam, January 24, 2011 04:24pm | Post a Comment
The Kinks
My friend Scobey swears that the Kinks are the best band of all time -- and he just might be right. In terms of 60's British bands, and ones associated with the so-called British Invasion, they rank among my personal top favorites -- which is why I picked out the six wonderful, circa mid-sixties Kinks music videos below.

Highly influential, with a direct influence heard in countless bands in the years/decades since, The Kinks were formed by North London brothers Ray Davies (lead vocals, rhythm guitar) and Dave Davies (lead guitar, vocals) in 1963. Both men remained with the group up until they officially disbanded in '96.

They had several different other members over the years, but the original sixties Kinks bassist & vocalist was Pete Quaife, while the original drummer (up until '69) was Mick Avory. This is the lineup and Kinks that I love the most and for some reason have been going back and re-listening to and enjoying even more than when I first heard all these songs. The videos below are all Kinks songs from the years 1964 to 1966.

What I love most about the Kinks is how they effortlessly incorporated so many styles yet melded them all into their own distinct sound. Like most of the sixties British bands, they drew directly from American blues (in some songs you can hear the Howlin Wolf influence), but they didn't stop there. Their sound was also r&B, rock n' roll, psychedelia, pop, and even folk and country. But they also mined the British music hall school and of all the British Invasion bands were decidedly the most British in sheer style. Check out the video below for their very British working class, Dickens like "Dead End Street" -- with its dark humor and depressing social observations. Years later Oasis, a band who loved to tap into previous era Brit pop, drew inspiration from from this short Kinks film piece for their "The Importance of Being Idle" music video. Another second wave Brit pop band, Blur, has also cited the Kinks as a major influence.

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