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Music History Monday: November 24

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 24, 2014 10:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 24, 1966 - The Beatles will begin recording "Strawberry Fields Forever" at Abbey Road Studios in London. After a three month vacation, the band will return to the studio to begin work on the follow up to "Revolver." The first song recorded is a new composition of John Lennon's titled "Strawberry Fields Forever." Lennon will write the song in Almeria, Spain while filming How I Won The War with director Richard Lester in the early Fall of 1966. One take of the song will be recorded that evening, though it'll change dramatically and grow more complex over the month that it takes to complete the track. The song will mark the beginning of a new era in the band's creativity that will change the face of popular music yet again. The song is named for a Salvation Army orphanage around the corner from Lennon's childhood home in Liverpool where he would attend garden parties in the summer. Once in the studio, the song will evolve from a gentle, sparsely arranged ballad to a heavily scored piece with horns and strings complimenting the basic track. The finished version of the song will consist of two separate versions. Lennon will like the first half of the first remake and the second half of another. He will suggest to producer George Martin that the two be edited together, which at first seems to not be possible since they are recorded in different keys and tempos. Martin will discover that by increasing the speed of one and slowing down the other recording, that they will match. Originally intended to be part of the band's next album (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band), "Strawberry Fields Forever" will instead be issued as one half of a double A-sided single in February 1967 (w/ "Penny Lane"). It will peak at #2 on the UK singles chart and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 

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Music History Monday: November 3

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 3, 2014 10:07am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 3, 1962 - "He's A Rebel" by The Crystals hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks. Written by Gene Pitney, it is biggest hit for the New York-based girl group. The song is originally written for The Shirelles who will turn it down. Producer Phil Spector will hear the song and immediately want to record it with his group The Crystals. Spector soon discovers that Vikki Carr has already recorded it (with producer Snuff Garrett) and it is about to be released as a single. The Crystals are on tour at the time on the East Coast and are not available. Not wasting any time, Spector has Darlene Love & The Blossoms record it instead, but releases it under The Crystals name. Cut at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood with members of The Wrecking Crew, the single is rush released in late August of 1962. Entering the Hot 100 at #98 on September 8, 1962, The Crystals version will shoot to the top of the chart eight weeks later, while Vikki Carr's bubbles under at #115. Carr will not debut on the Hot 100 until September of 1967 with her breakthrough hit "It Must Be Him" (#3 Pop).
 

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Music History Monday: October 6

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 6, 2014 08:00am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 6, 1969 - "Something" b/w "Come Together" by The Beatles is released (UK release date is on October 31, 1969). Written by George Harrison, John Lennon, and Paul McCartney, it is the 18th US chart-topper for the Fab Four. The lone single is issued from the band's recently released album Abbey Road. The ballad "Something" is written by George Harrison while the flipside "Come Together" is actually written by John Lennon but is credited to Lennon/McCartney. By the time the single reaches #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 29th, both sides will be listed at the top (w/ "Come Together" listed first) due to a change in chart policy. Billboard begins listing the A and B sides of a single receiving radio airplay and generating sales in the same chart position rather than separately. Initially, the two sides will debut on the chart separately with "Something" entering the Hot 100 at #20 and "Come Together" at #23 on October 18, 1969. "Come Together" will climb as high as #2 and "Something" at #3 before "Come Together" slips back to #7 and "Something" holds at #3. Billboard will then combine the airplay and sales chart information for both sides of the single, providing the momentum for both to ascend to number one. "Come Together/Something" is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: August 11

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 11, 2014 07:24am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.


On this day in music history: August 11, 1966 - John Lennon holds a press conference at the Astor Towers in Chicago to apologize for remarks he had made in an interview published five months earlier. The original interview with journalist Maureen Cleave is published in the British newspaper The Evening Standard on March 4th. During the interview, Lennon will comment on religion and what he feels is the decline of Christianity in modern times. The comments will make little to no impact in Great Britain. On the eve of the band's fourth American Tour, US fan magazine Datebook will reprint Lennon’s comments out of context causing a furor in the US bible belt with radio stations banning the band's music, burning their records, and The Beatles themselves receiving death threats. After Lennon’s public apology, the uproar will eventually blow over. Though it will mark the beginning of the end of The Beatles days as a touring band. They will quietly and permanently withdraw from the road when they play their final live date at the end of the month at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.
 


On this day in music history: August 11, 1969Barabajagal, the seventh album by Donovan is released. Produced by Mickie Most, it is recorded at Olympic Studios in London in May 1968 and American Recording Company in Los Angeles in November 1968 and May 1969. The album features musical backing by The Jeff Beck Group (on the title track) as well as background vocals from Graham Nash, Mike McGear (aka Michael McCartney), Rod Stewart, and Madeline Bell. It will spin off two singles including the double A-sided single "Atlantis/To Susan On The West Coast Waiting" (#7 Pop) and the title track (#36 Pop). The album will also mark the end of Donovan's long term collaboration with producer Mickie Most, with Most shifting his attention to his newly formed label RAK Records and signing artists such as Hot Chocolate, The Arrows, Smokie, and Suzi QuatroBarabajagal will peak at number 23 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Digging in the Crates of OMCA's "Vinyl: The Sound and Culture of Records" Pt 2 featuring 12 Man Rambo & Lori Katz

Posted by Billyjam, July 8, 2014 05:33pm | Post a Comment



In the second Amoeblog dedicated to some of the curated crates that are currently on exhibit (through July 27th) at the Oakland Museum of California (OMCA) as part of the Vinyl: The Sound and Culture of Records we present selections from both the creates of Lori Katz  (manager at Amoeba Music which is the primary sponsor of this must-attend exhibit) and 12 Man Rambo. The exhibit includes weekly Talk and Play sessions where folks from the local music community stop by and chat informally with museum goers and play samples of records. Joe Colley will speak this week in the Talk and Play session on the topic of "experiments in sound" on Saturday July 12th 1pm-230pm. Photos in this piece are by permission of OMCA and James Mak for Joysco Photos.

Meanwhile for her crate’s selection Lori Katz explained that, "I dug through the $1.00 bins at Amoeba Music. The records that I chose are examples of what I was listening to when I was beginning to become aware of music. My first memories of listening to music are when I went away to summer camp. This was in 1975-1977. My camp counselors introduced me to Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, and so much great music of that time. Looking at these record covers brings back so many great memories."

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