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Music History Monday: September 8

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 8, 2014 10:34am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 8, 1970Third Album by The Jackson 5 is released. Produced by The Corporation and Hal Davis, it is recorded at The Sound Factory and Motown Recording Studio in Hollywood from April - September 1970. The group's third full-length album in just nine months, it contains original songs written by Motown staff writers as well as cover versions of hits by Simon & Garfunkel ("Bridge Over Troubled Water"), Shades Of Blue ("Oh How Happy"), and The Delfonics ("Ready Or Not (Here I Come)"). It will spin off two hit singles including their biggest hit "I'll Be There" (#1 Pop for five weeks and R&B for six weeks) and "Mama's Pearl" (#2 Pop & R&B), though the album version of "Mama" will feature alternate vocals from the hit single version (issued in January of 1971). It will become the group's second biggest selling album in the US, moving an estimated 4.6 million copies. Third Album will spend ten weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number four on the Top 200.
 


On this day in music history: September 8, 1972All The Young Dudes, the fifth album by Mott The Hoople, is released. Produced by David Bowie, it is recorded at Olympic Studios and Trident Studios in London from May - July 1972. The band's fifth release marks a major turning point in their career. The struggling band will be on the verge of breaking up, when Bowie steps in and offers to produce them. Initially, he will offer them the song "Sufferagette City," which they will turn down. When he plays them "All The Young Dudes," they will enthusiastically accept it. It will spin off two singles including "One Of The Boys" (#96 Pop) and the title track (#37 Pop, #3 UK Pop), which will become an anthem. The album will be regarded as a classic of the Glam Rock movement of the early to mid '70s. "Dudes" will become the band's signature song, and is covered by numerous artists including Aerosmith, Judas Priest, and Ozzy Osbourne. Mott The Hoople's original recording will be featured in the films Clueless and Juno. Later there will be some speculation as to what record label owns the rights to the recording. Mott The Hoople had recorded for Island Records prior to signing with Columbia Records. The band may or may or may not have recorded either part or all of the album before changing labels. To this day, it is a matter that none of the band members are willing to discuss. All The Young Dudes will peak at number 89 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: July 1

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 1, 2013 11:19am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 1, 1945 - Singer and songwriter Debbie Harry of Blondie (born Deborah Ann Harry in Miami, FL). Happy 68th Birthday, Debbie!
 

Born on this day: July 1, 1951 - The B-52's lead singer and songwriter Fred Schneider (born Frederick William Schneider III in Newark, NJ). Happy 62nd Birthday, Fred!
 


Born on this day: July 1, 1960 - R&B vocal legend Evelyn "Champagne" King (born in the Bronx, NY). Happy 53rd Birthday, Evelyn! (See pictures from Evelyn's in-store at Amoeba SF!)
 

Born on this day: July 1, 1971 - Singer/rapper/songwriter and producer Missy Elliott (born Melissa Arnette Elliott in Portsmouth, VA). Happy 42nd Birthday, Missy!!
 

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Music History Monday: August 27

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 27, 2012 05:20pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Remembering blues guitar great Stevie Ray Vaughan, October 3, 1954 - August 27, 1990.


On this day in music history: August 27, 1966
- "Blowin’ In The Wind" by Stevie Wonder hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for one week, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on September 3rd. Written by Bob Dylan, Wonder records his cover version after receiving many requests from fans who have heard him perform the song in his live show. Stevie’s producer Clarence Paul will sing co-lead vocals on the track. The song originally appears on Stevie Wonder’s 1966 album Uptight. “Blowin’ In The Wind” will be the then 16-year-old Motown stars’ third R&B chart topper and third top 10 pop single.


On this day in music history: August 27, 1967I Was Made To Love Her, the seventh album by Stevie Wonder is released. Produced by Henry Cosby and Clarence Paul, it is recorded at Motown Studio A in Detroit from late 1966 to mid 1967. Titled after his recent R&B chart topper and top five pop hit, the album features covers of Ray Charles' "A Fool For You" and James Brown's "Please, Please, Please," as well as several Motown standards such as "My Girl" and "Can I Get A Witness." I Was Made To Love Her will peak at #7 on the Billboard R&B album chart and #45 on the Top 200.

(Wherein the author steers his fears and beers with queers.)

Posted by Job O Brother, June 7, 2012 10:11am | Post a Comment


Um... eek.


This weekend, Los Angeles celebrates its main Gay Pride festival and I plan on being there. This may not seem like a stunning “news flash” to many of you, dear readers, but those who know me well know that I have a phobia of parades and balloons, I will not wait anything over 10 minutes for a table at any restaurant no matter how piquant their comestibles, nor will I eat standing up (and certainly not in a crowd!) and I’m allergic to most forms of fun – all of these are features of such events (or so I'm told).

But here’s another fact about me: I’ve never participated in any Pride activities in any city, any year, ever – and that strikes me as, well… queer. So this is the year I’m remedy it. I'm coming out! (...of my safe and cozy home.)

I need to go buy bottles of water and sun-block with an SPF of pi, but before I do, I wanted to get some mood music from our rich, LGBT heritage (see below). Beats make me braver!

And if you plan on coming to LA’s Pride, look for me. I’ll undoubtedly be cowering in some dark corner, terrified of everything, but doing it with a rad attitude.



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Amoeba Bloggers Answer: What Was Your First Album?

Posted by Billy Gil, March 6, 2012 07:09pm | Post a Comment
I recently was at Amoeba Hollywood and overheard a customer telling an employee Davy Jones had died. I hadn’t heard the news yet. She brought it up because she was buying Katy Perry records for her daughter. She said her daughter didn’t even have a record player — she just wanted every bit of Katy Perry merchandise she could get her hands on.
 
The only artist I can ever remember being that obsessive about was The Smashing Pumpkins, but that was in high school. But it got me thinking about those first tapes, records, singles etc. that everyone got as a kid.
 
ace of base the signFor me, the first album I ever bought on my own was Ace of Base’s The Sign on cassette. I had always liked music, but at 11, I had just started to pay attention to what songs were on the radio. A friend made me a tape from the radio and “The Sign” was on it. I loved it. In the coming weeks and months, albums by Nirvana, Guns N’ Roses, Stone Temple Pilots, Green Day, and my beloved Pumpkins would follow, but really it all started with Ace of Base for me. Though if I’m being technical, I had a cassette single of Paula Abdul’s “Promise of a New Day” that I listened to constantly when I was like 9, but I didn’t buy that — I won it at a cousin’s music-themed birthday party, at which my dad dressed himself and me as Simon & Garfunkel. I had no idea who they were. I think I was Paul Simon.
 
While I’m embarrassing myself, I thought I’d extend the question to the other Amoeba bloggers: What was your first album? Not kids’ music, but not just the cool stuff, either — the tapes we once listened to repeatedly and then put away in a drawer somewhere once we realized how lame they were, though I’m still on the hunt for The Sign on vinyl. Here are their answers:
 
Eric Brightwell
the cure kiss me kiss me kiss meMy first record was Luciano Pavarotti's My Own Story, a compilation of “musical highlights of his spectacular career.” They used to heavily advertise it on TV when I got home from school, and I was hooked. My first cassette was Peter Gabriel's So. I'd liked the singles from it, but when “Big Time” came out, I was obsessed. My first CD was The Cure’s Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. I was introduced to it by a German exchange student named Ina. Before she left I rode my bike into town to a Wal-Mart to get a blank cassette to dub it. I loved it so much, I thought it warranted being purchased on CD. 
 


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