Amoeblog

New York State of Mind Amoeblog #41: A Night At The Museum, Beats On The Water, Bam's Record Collection, Free Movies + more

Posted by Billyjam, July 24, 2013 03:00pm | Post a Comment

The above photo of the fountain in Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village was taken mid-afternoon this past weekend when New York City temperatures reached around 100 degrees which, combined with high humidity levels, made for unbearably hot weather. Hence why many jumped into the fountain to cool off and obtain some respite from the NYC weather that this week has leveled out and returned to a relatively cooler state with temps hovering around 80 degrees today and humidity at only about 50%. This is outdoor weather for sure and NYC in the summertime offers an abundance of things to do out in the street, in the parks, and by and on the water. This New York State of Mind Amoeblog #41 will take a look at some of these events and happenings, including one of the many great boat parties that take place off Manhattan. On any given summer evening/night along the Hudson waterfront - especially from midtown down to lower Manhattan - you will inevitably hear the strains of electronic, hip-hop, reggae, salsa, rock or other music wafting in over the water from one of the countless boat parties that slowly drift by with booming speakers out on the waterways on weekends and week nights too. These are a great way to catch some music (live bands or DJs) and do some sightseeing at the same time.

This Friday (July 26th) is a recommended dance music boat party that sets sail from midtown on the West Side. It's the WAVs Hudson River Tour with an impressive lineup of DJs including UK producer Switch (formerly of Major Lazer), Grandmaster Flash, Octo Octa, Neon Indian (DJ set), Cousin Cole, and Roxy CottontailAdvance tickets available here are just $30 to $40 depending on how soon you cop them - not bad for a 4 hour cruise with good music. Boarding starts at 7pm for 8pm departure from 7pm from Pier 81 at West 42nd Street @ 12th Ave.

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The 12 Days of Coachella: 8 Don't I Know You From Somewhere?

Posted by Amoebite, April 12, 2010 05:58pm | Post a Comment
"One man's attempt to dissect the method to 3 days of madness in the desert"
  - By Scott Butterworth


On the 3rd weekend of April my Coachella will give to me.....
.....
12 DJ's DJing.....11 Angelenos....10 Duos Duet-ing....9 Debut Albums....

....and 8 "Don't I Know You From Somewhere?":  

Public Image Limited
She & Him
The Cribs
Perry Ferrall vs. Steve Porter
Major Lazer
Bad Lieutenant
Charlotte Gainsbourg
Owen Pallet


Coachella Lineup






















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Dance Music All Night Long

Posted by Smiles Davis, July 8, 2009 03:43pm | Post a Comment
Music, good music, is popping up everywhere and I’m loving every minute of it. Dance music in particular is really having the best year ever. I’m not just talking about house and techno, I’m talking about music that makes you wanna boogie, music that really makes you wanna get down with the get down and forget all your worries. I don't exactly know who to give credit to for putting the fun back in music but one thing is absolute: everything eventually comes full circle.

Back in the day—we’re talking the 70’s—there was disco, a little bit of hip-hop, some more disco, what was left of modern jazz, rock-n-roll, and a little more disco. The best thing about urban nightlife at that time was disco. And you didn’t hear none of that A.D.D. DJ we hear so frequently today, where the music selector changes songs every thirty seconds (thanks a lot DJ AM). No, none of that. The DJ’s at the discotheques usually played the long versions of songs, nearly in their entirety, to keep the feet on the dance floor all night long. Oh, how things have changed.

At that time, people weren’t up on hip-hop like that quite yet; it was still pretty underground. You had to know where to go to find a DJ spinning hip-hop. And chances are, if you knew about it, you knew it was the only spot in town where you could go to hear that type of music. Not to mention the fact that that one and only spot was probably members only. You had to be affiliated with a crew to gain access. If you weren’t a part of a tagging crew, a breaking crew, or one of the emcees or DJs, chances were you didn’t even know about it. But, back to disco. It started mainly on the east coast in the late 60’s. By the early 70’s disco had cross-pollinated and spread like wild fire all over the globe. Most popular soul and funk acts like Earth, Wind & Fire and The Bar-kays soon jumped ship and found themselves chin deep in the disco trend. Unfortunately, like most fads, disco was finished quicker than morning coffee and soon disappeared from the radar. For the most part, I think the public wanted it that way. Disco Demolition Night, a promotional event that took place on Thursday, July 12, 1979, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois, was in part to blame for the end of an era. However, industry folk and even many consumers talked about the decline of the genre long before this event took place.  

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