Amoeblog

New Fusion of Afrobeat and Moroccan Gnawa Unveiled

Posted by Billyjam, November 8, 2012 06:08am | Post a Comment

Fangnawa Feature: Fanga + Maâlem Abdallah Guinéa Fuse Afrobeat & Moroccan Gnawa

As outlined in the engaging mini documentary above from Strut Records Fangnawa Experience is a unique musical hybrid that fuses two distinct African musical styles; North Africa's ceremonial Gnawa Music with West Africa's Afrobeat. This new cross cultural fusion, that sounds totally natural, comes care of the French collective Fanga and Moroccan master musician Maâlem Abdallah Guinéa who each wanted to do something new and uncharted with their respective music. This they ably accomplished with this new cross pollination that they originally unveiled at the Détours du Monde festival in Montpelier, France last year when they realized they shared a musical common ground.

Both forms consist of trance like qualities that seemed destined to go together. The enriching results of their naturally compatible collaboration (even though they don't speak the same language) is seen/heard in the above short documentary film. The artists call their music and their hybrid project the Fangnawa Experience - the title that Fanga and Maâlem Abdallah Guinéa will be releasing their joint project next week (November 13th) via Strut Records. Look for it at Amoeba in the World Music section.

Amoeba Hollywood World Music Best Sellers For January & February 2011

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 5, 2011 11:00pm | Post a Comment
   The Rise Of Bossa Nova Soul Jazz Records                                                                                   
   1. Afrocubism-S/T
   2. V/A-Rise Of Bossa Nova
   3. Celso Piña-Sin Fecha De Caducidad
   4. Serge Gainsbourg-Historie De Melody Nelson
   5. Eydie Gorme Y Los Panchos-Cantan En Español
   6. V/A-Psych Funk: Sa-Ra Ga!
   7. V/A-Sofrito
   8. Enrique Iglesias-Eurphoria
   9. Cristan Castro-Viva El Principe
  10. V/A-Pomegranates

Hands down the biggest world music seller over the last three months has been the Afrocubism CD. However, giving it a good chase is The Rise Of Bossa Nova compilation on Soul Jazz Records. There's a CD version, two separate double LP sets and a book (all sold separately) with all the classic original Bossa Nova tracks that DJ’s have brought back into circulation over the last ten years.

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Sofrito: Tropical Discotheque Reviewed By Gomez Comes Alive

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, January 31, 2011 08:56am | Post a Comment
Sofrito:Tropical Discoteque
Over the years I made it a habit to dig through all the used Electronica 12”s to perhaps find a lost worldly gem. I’ll usually take a gamble on any used 12” that usually flirts with some sort of World Music theme. I look for key words such as “Afro,” “Brazilian” and “Latin” if I don’t already know the artist. A few years back I found a 12” from a label called Sofrito Discothèque. It looked cool so I bought it even though I had never heard of the label. The single was called Music Is The Word. It was a mixture of Latin, Afrobeat and Caribbean rhythms. I am so glad I took a chance on that single! I became a fan of the label and it became another go-to label along with Bastard Jazz, Freestyle and Raw Fusion in finding World Music edits and jams.

2011 finds a great pairing of two labels -- Strut Records, which has been releasing World Music heat for over a decade, has paired up with the Sofrito crew (Hugo Mendez, Frankie Francis and The Mighty Crime Minister) in releasing Tropical Discotheque. What I like about this compilation is that it mixes both vintage World music tracks and tracks made recently by newer artists. Vintage bangers from Banda Los Hijos De La Niña Luz and Mighty Shadow are joined by newer tracks from Frente Cumbiero and Quantic Y Su Conjunto Los Miticos Del Ritmo. On top of that, a few of the Sofrito edits are thrown in for good measure. The flow of African, Latin and Caribbean jams works together quite nicely, like a meal at a fusion restaurant that doesn’t take the grittiness away from the original dish when combining it with another culture’s flavor. In other words, it doesn't suck.

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