Amoeblog

10 Record Store Day Releases to Look For on Black Friday

Posted by Billy Gil, November 17, 2014 12:09pm | Post a Comment

record store day black friday amoeba

Black Friday launches the holiday shopping season the day after Thanksgiving with lots of great deals. Instead of yanking someone by the hair off of that $10 barbecue set at Wal-Marts or whatever, you can come to Amoeba for a variety of deals on turntables, Blu-rays, gift certificates and more. Additionally, there will be nearly 140 Record Store Day exclusive Black Friday releases to choose from—see the whole list (.pdf) here. That’s a lot of records, bro/broette! Here are 10 that stood out to me.

David BowieSue (Or in a Season of Crime) 12”

david bowie sue or in a season of crime“Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)” is an unsettling new David Bowie track full of jazzy horns and creepy lyrics about a dissolving relationship that may end in murder. It’s backed on this 7” by another new Bowie song, “Tis a Pity She Was a Whore,” a fluctuating electro-rocker that shares its name with a play from the 1600s by John Ford. Both songs will also appear on the Bowie retrospective Nothing Has Changed, which came out today, but here’s your chance to get them separately from that. Hear both tracks in all their maddening glory below:

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The Best Albums of 2014 So Far

Posted by Billy Gil, June 27, 2014 04:54pm | Post a Comment

sun kil moon mark kozelekmadlibst. vincentIt is now almost exactly halfway through 2014! It’s time to look back on the last six months and see what’s it’s had to offer music-wise. There’s already been a bunch of great records released this year, including a couple of excellent ones released just this week. If you haven’t checked these out, they’re all worth getting—pick ’em all up and catch up on what you’ve been missing.

Sun Kil Moon Benji

sun kil moon benji lpSome people write memoirs. Sun Kil Moon’s Mark Kozelek write songs crammed with details, from a brutal story about a distant cousin’s death by a freak fire to mundane details about Panera bread and sports bar shit on the walls, that somehow come together to form something called a life. Just when you feel like the songs are too stuffed to keep up, Kozelek will let his breathy “sadcore” folk open up and focus on a seemingly trivial line like “blue crab cakes” in the song “Ben's My Friend,” and in doing so perfectly captures the weird things that stick out in our heads when we reflect. Simply put, listening is like attending a master class in songwriting.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Douglas Dare

Posted by Amoebite, May 7, 2014 03:37pm | Post a Comment

Douglas Dare

British singer-songwriter Douglas Dare is the new kid on the block. Dare vocalizes his short prose and poems to a backdrop of drums and electronics with his piano strokes taking center stage. He creates a soundscape that is emotionally deep and sonically wide open. At just 22 years old, Dare comes off as a seasoned Douglas Daresongwriter with a mastery skill level. He cites Thom Yorke and Rufus Wainwright as influences and his newly released full-length, Whelm (Erased Tapes), proves he has the chops to one day be held in the same regard as such heavyweights.

Douglas Dare took time out of his tour schedule to hang out at Amoeba Hollywood and dig for vinyl. Our camera crew were in tow and captured another cool episode of What's In My Bag?. Dare starts things off with an inspiration from childhood, a classical album by Claude Debussy played by Emile Naoumoff. He also picks up WhoMadeWho's Knee Deep and a more contemporary inspiration, St Vincent's latest self-titled release. Check out the full episode for all of Douglas Dare's cool finds. 

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St. Vincent Comes to the GRAMMY Museum in LA March 20

Posted by Rachael McGovern, March 11, 2014 01:24pm | Post a Comment

St Vincent

Join us for a conversation and performance with St. Vincent at the GRAMMY Museum in downtown LA on Thursday, March 20! Annie Clark has just released her fourth album, St. Vincent (Universal), which our reviewer described as "absolutely breathtaking" and the NY Times called "dulcet and ferocious, meticulous and deranged."

Amoeba sponsors The Drop: St. Vincent, an interview with GRAMMY Museum Executive Director Bob Santelli, and performance with Ms. Clark. Doors are at 7:30 on 3/20 and the event begins at 8pm. Tickets are on sale now for $25. Get your tickets here.



St. Vincent - Digital Witness
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Album Picks: St. Vincent, Schoolboy Q, Beck, Wild Beasts, Neneh Cherry

Posted by Billy Gil, February 25, 2014 10:30am | Post a Comment

St. Vincent - St. Vincent (LP or CD)

st. vincent st. vincent lp amoebaSt. Vincent’s absolutely breathtaking new album begins, as Annie Clark’s previous albums have, like some unearthly musical. Clark seemingly touches down from another planet, asking “am I the only one in the world?” on opener “Rattlesnake” amid all manner of alien guitar and strange percussive squelches. “Birth in Reverse” similarly paints a vivid picture, starting with the lines “Oh what an ordinary day …  take out the garbage, masturbate.” “Birth in Reverse” explodes into an extraordinary, paranoid chorus of restless glee. Clark’s way with words has never been more cutting, as on “Prince Johnny,” which manages to be strikingly specific while keeping its deeper existential meaning vague (“Remember that time we snorted/That piece of the Berlin Wall you extorted?” is her best rhyming couplet yet.) Even her ballads bite—“I prefer your love to Jesus” is a thoroughly loaded line repeated on “I Prefer Your Love,” giving depth and conflict to what’s on the surface a beautiful, Kate Bush-inspired love song. Musically, Clark employs everything from decaying choruses (“Prince Johnny”) to hip-hop synths (“Huey Newton”) to Prince-esque atonal funk (“Digital Witness”), but it’s a remarkably cohesive listen, as though each element has been thoroughly considered and sanded down to perfection. As implied by naming her fourth album simply St. Vincent, it’s an album that seems to be about truly knowing oneself—or the thrilling discoveries that come with a lifetime of seeking that knowledge.

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