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PhilaMOCA to Present Celebration of the group Sparks featuring Artist Submissions

Posted by Billyjam, August 1, 2012 05:27pm | Post a Comment

Sparks "This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Both of Us" (1974 from Kimono My House)

The Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art
(aka PhilaMOCA) is presenting a tribute to the group Sparks on October 6th titled Sparkstacular. In addition to an evening entirely dedicated to the music and career of the Sparks' brothers Ron and Russell Mael, the event will also include Sparks related art submissions (visual and musical) from artists who send in work over the next seven weeks to be chosen by the curator for inclusion in the exhibit. Apparently PhilaMOCA's director/curator Eric Bresler is an obsessive Sparks fan who not only has every release by the duo throughout their long & varied career that began in 1971 but also travels around the world to catch his favorite band perform live. Over the years he has seen Sparks play in such cities as London, Stockholm, Tokyo, and Los Angeles.

The one-day only Sparkstacular event will feature a Sparks-themed art show/memorabilia reception followed by live performances of Sparks songs from local musicians and a screening of rare Sparks performance footage and television appearances presented by Video Pirates. And Bresler is inviting artists to submit Sparks-related work "that either depicts the brothers Mael or was inspired by their work."  Submissions are due by Friday, September 22nd with a submission fee of $25 per artwork. The PhilaMOCA is inviting musicians with an admiration for the music of Sparks to reach out and reserve their spot in the parade of live Sparks covers.

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The '80s List: Part 11

Posted by Amoebite, September 5, 2011 11:35am | Post a Comment
Hanoi RocksOne day at Amoeba Hollywood I proclaimed that Aztec Camera's 1983 release High Land, Hard Rain was one of the best records of the '80s. This single statement eventually led to over 200 Amoebites ranking their top 10 favorite albums from the ‘80s.

From the beginning we realized that it was impossible for most of us to condense our favorites from all genres into a tiny top ten list. So, we limited our lists to Rock/Pop and its sub-genres like punk, metal, goth, and new wave. Even so, it was a difficult selection process because not only are there hundreds of amazing records to consider, there is also the added dynamic of time.

The '80s were a long time ago and the music has had many years to gestate. We have a deep sense of nostalgia and sentiment with these albums as our fondest memories are associated with them. These are albums we LOVE.

- Henry Polk

See all entries in our ‘80s list series.

P.P.S. The '80s List Book is available for sale at Amoeba Hollywood.


Daniel Tures

Sonic YouthDaydream Nation (1988)
The Durutti ColumnLC (1981)
Prefab SproutSteve McQueen (1985)
Van Halen1984 (1984)
Love TractorThemes From Venus (1989)
Tears For FearsSongs From The Big Chair (1985)
The OutfieldPlay Deep (1985)
The Legendary Pink DotsBasilisk (1983)
The JudysWarsharma (1981)
Def LeppardPyromania (1983)

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Amoeba Hollywood Vinyl Insider -- Collectible Latin LPs AND 7" Rarities Overhaul!!!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, February 11, 2011 11:00am | Post a Comment

Stop by the Hollywood store for a great batch of recently acquired collectibles -- Picture sleeve 7", girl groups, northern & modern soul rarities & a great batch of Latin collectibles. We're talking salsa, guaguanco, sealed Tico originals, Mongo, La Lupe and much more!
 

Oh Bondage!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 21, 2009 12:22am | Post a Comment
gregg diamond bionic boogie lp covercher prisioner lp coverdavid james holster chinese honeymoon lp cover
house of commons patriot lp coverpaul hyde & the payolas here's the world for ya lp coverheaven 17 penthouse and pavement 12" cover
nelson slater wild angel lp coveryvonne fair the bitch is black lp coverchi-chi favelas rock solid  cover
miracle help lp covermartin circus coverthe gimmicks high heels 10" cover

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Playing With the Boys: the Blue Angels are Top Gun

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 16, 2008 02:33pm | Post a Comment
U. S. Navy Blue Angels fly vertical
San Francisco's annual Fleet Week is over, but I'm still reeling in its aftermath. Every year on the last day of the air show I get together with a few good friends, pack a picnic and some drinks and head to a good vantage point to watch a few fly-boys do what they do best; that is, make a spectacle of their exceptional flying skills. Every day, the show is punctuated by an exemplary performance put on by the U.S. Navy Blue Angels who exhibit nothing but aviation at its extreme finest. It seems like everyone in San Francisco has something to say about the Angels, whether its the oft repeated dour expression of dislike or the rare wide-eyed, glowing expression of praise. Perhaps that's because their presence is impossible to ignore -- it's not every day that one hears what sounds like God taking a seam ripper to the sky. (Thankfully, the Fleet Week air shows did not coincide with the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival this year, much to the delight of all the music lovers who flocked to Golden Gate Park.) I, for one, enjoy their ear-trembling display of non-normalcy. I understand those who argue that the Angels represent a militaristic waste of tax dollars and non-renewable resources, that they're noisy and scary, and that they exist essentially as a weapon, but just look at what they do! There really is nothing quite like them. No matter what is said against them I stand firmly planted on my ground of wondering what the hell possesses people to push themselves to such limits. Whether what they do is deemed right or wrong in your eyes, chances are what they do is something you can't fathom. It is the stuff of dreams and they, the Blue Angels, are like flying rattlesnakes waking you from your sleepy-head, from a world obsessed with headlines, deadlines and the horrid notion of the possibility of bread lines. 
Goose and Maverick sing You've Lost That Loving Feeling
After the show my friends and I settled in for some pints and pitchers at a local pub. To my surprise there were more than a few sailors and Naval officers among the bar patrons. Like the Angels, their presence could not be ignored: handsome young men, clean cut in crispy white uniforms, shiny shoes and the hats hats hats all piled up on a ledge, I imagine for the purpose of keeping them tidy while they watched football or played air hockey. There was certainly a hat for every serviceman in the joint: starchy white and rounded sailors caps and wide-brimmed and polished officer's hats adorned in gold ornaments and filigree. Put together with the flamboyant aircraft we'd watched all afternoon, this picture of seamen at play reminded me of a movie, hard. This meeting of the real and the fantasy of the days' dealings was noticed by everyone and so when it was declared, in friendly buzzing slurs, that before the end of the night Top Gun must be seen, the decision was unanimous. I hadn't seen the film in quite some time and the thought of having to see it with such friends as those who, like me, so suddenly cultured a need for speed sent me into a frenzy of excitement. 

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