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Record Store Day 2014 A Big Success, And There's Still Hours Left To Shop For Exclusive Record Store Day Releases

Posted by Billyjam, April 19, 2014 05:03pm | Post a Comment

Diggin' in the Hip-Hop 12" Crates At 18 Months - Record Store Day 2014 Amoeba Berkeley

 

"It's been the busiest Record Store Day ever!" reported Amoeba Berkeley employee Gail at 4pm today during Record Store Day. People were lined up outside hours before the 10:30am opening of the Telegraph Ave. store this morning, and once those early shoppers got inside they gravitated towards the sections where they knew their desired RSD releases would be. Then they had to line up to buy them.

"Boy, there was this very long line that started in here and snaked all the way around, up and down those isles, and then on over to the cash register," said Gail, pointing all the way across the store from the world music section, not far from where DJ Inti was spinning some Afrika Bambaataa at that moment, while many shoppers were busy digging in the crates. These shoppers included the little 18 month old girl with her pops in the above video. One happy record shopper I ran into earlier had copped the special Record Store Day clear vinyl three-record set reissue of the Notorious B.I.G.'s Life After Death while another had picked up the RSD reissue of Sam Cooke's final album Ain't That Good News on vinyl. While many titles may already be gone there are still a lot left and several hours of shopping remain on this Record Store Day 2014. So head over to your local record store, especially if it is Amoeba. Amoeba San Francisco closes at 8pm, Amoeba Hollywood closes at 9pm, and Amoeba Berkeley closes at 10pm today.
 

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Four Inch Focus- Foodstuffs

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 17, 2012 11:30am | Post a Comment

Check out my collection of fruit labels from 2009, click HERE

(Which sees our author recovering.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 21, 2010 12:55pm | Post a Comment
big butt

Whew! Am I glad to see you! Because it means that it’s a new week, and let me tell you – I used last week until it was nothing but a grey and tattered rag. So I can’t wear last week anymore, but I can use it to clean my car.

But I don’t have a car.

Life is complicated.

Since I arrived in Hollywood five years ago, a young and vibrant crackerjack of a kid with high hopes and boundless dreams, I have used my wit and spunk to cultivate a lifestyle wherein which I spend most of my time hidden away in my spooky study, hunched over my laptop and writing scripts about young and vibrant crackerjack kids which I ceased to resemble about five years ago. It’s a circle of muthuhfuggin’ life.

As a result, I haven’t ever actually developed a circle of friends. I’ve just kind of Yoko Ono’d my way into my boyfriend’s social circle, hoping no one would notice. People from my hometown find this hard to believe.

“Job, how is it that a young and vibrant crackerjack like you hasn’t been surrounded by fawning admirers?” they collectively ask.

“Well gang,” I answer as I mix up a batch of my famous celebrities, “I’ve just been so focused on my writing career. I’ve already met the person I want to be in a relationship with for the rest of my life, so unlike my single friends I’m not driven out to socialize in order to find a mate; plus there’s something about fun and laughter and good times that gives me a tummy ache.”

Sam Cooke - Sittin In the Sun

Posted by Miss Ess, January 31, 2010 09:59am | Post a Comment
I don't know if you caught the American Masters show on PBS the other night about Sam Cooke, but it was great.

sam cooke

Sam Cooke is, of course, an American Master, but he was also a man of the people. He charmed sam cookeeveryone he met, was a brilliant song writer and the first African American to own his own record label. He started his career in gospel and realized that if he wanted to advance himself and take better care of his family (see footage below), he needed to move out into the world of pop. With his careful cover choices and his well-honed genius for writing about topics that appealed to a mass audience, he became one of the first black entertainers to crossover and garner a huge number of white fans.

Playing segregated halls (eventually refusing to) and enduring despicable treatment in the South throughout the late 50s and early 60s, Cooke realized he was in a position as a popular artist to say something about what was going on in America. He covered Bob Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind" regularly, but also was inspired to write his own anthem for the movement, "A Change Is Gonna Come," to this day one of the most affecting songs ever to grace the airwaves.

Cooke was, beyond everything else, a self-made man, one who bowed to no one and who crossed boundaries no one thought possible at the time. He gained the respect of the people with his integrity, enthusiasm and smarts. Like many talented artists, his life was cut short early and tragically, at a hotel in Los Angeles in December 1964 when he was shot to death at the age of 33.

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Bob Keane R.I.P. (1922-2009)

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, December 1, 2009 10:11am | Post a Comment

Los Angeles
lost one of its great independent operators a couple of days ago. Bob Keane died of renal failure at the age of 87. Previously he had conquered lymphoma (at age 80) and survived decades of ups and downs, including battles with drugs, alcohol, the record industry & himself. 

His early years were spent as a successful clarinetist and big band leader, at one point taking over Artie Shaw's band -- he even took a crack at acting. In the early 50's, after a stint in WWII, he hosted a local variety show on channel 2, but looming in the near future was his true calling.

Keene Records was started by Keane and John Siamas & their first hit was a doozy. "You Send Me" by Sam Cooke made over a million dollars and made an international star out of Cooke. Unfortunately, Keane hadn't any contracts with Siamas and soon Siamas gave him the business and Bob was left to his own devices. Never one to remain passive, Keane turned around and formed Del-Fi Records, releasing records from Frank Zappa, Little Caesar and the Romans, The Lively Ones, Surfaris, Johnny Crawford (of Rifleman fame), and Brenda Holloway, as well as an endless list of one off singles. Of course, the biggest Del-Fi sensation was Ritchie Vallens, but my favorite is the Eden Ahbez LP. Keane went on to more success and troubles with Bobby Fuller and eventually helped to kick start Barry White's career on the Mustang label. According to Keane, a bullwhip was Mr. White's weapon of choice back in his 50's street gang days.

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