Amoeblog

Barcodes

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, August 2, 2008 02:55pm | Post a Comment
A late entry in the vinyl yesteryear was the barcode. When exactly did they start appearing on the back of album jackets? I'm not exactly sure myself, but it appears to have been very early in the 80's. I've seen copies of the 1st Dickies on original yellow vinyl with one, and that album is from 1979. It might be that they had old copies of the vinyl lying around and had to repress covers in the early 80's though. Sometimes certain records can be difficult to track because a company might press up a ton of covers while pressing smaller batches of the actual vinyl, or vice versa. Coltrane on Atlantic is notorious for that-- you'll see covers clearly printed in the mid 60's with 70's label designs and such. Anyhow, I digress...This is not a gallery of barcodes off of the actual albums; it's a collection of price tags, primarily from the 80's-90's...

meliss etheridge barcode price tag
JC PennyHarry Chapin Verities & Balderdash barcode price tagcure kiss me kiss me kiss me barcode pricetagdeath scream bloody gore barcode pricetaglamont dozier black bach barcode price tag
hellion ann boleyn barcode price taghollies another night barcode price tagjoan jett i love rock & roll barcode price tag k-mart runaways
steve perry street talk barcode price tag k-mart journeyjacksons victory barcode price tag michael jackson record towntarget lp barcode price tag
rolling stones steel wheels barcode price tag keith richards mick jaggerkenny rogers what about me? barcode pricetag k-martzia records barcode price tag

"Not Fade Away" in Its Many Mutations.

Posted by Miss Ess, June 11, 2008 06:06pm | Post a Comment
"Not Fade Away"buddy holly not fade away the crickets is one of the best songs ever written: simple, direct, pleading, mentions a Cadillac in its lyrics...I mean, what more could you want in a song?

I had the great pleasure of witnessing a Bob Dylan show in 2000 from about four people back. It was incredible, and one of the highlights was "Not Fade Away."  I've pretty much been thinking about the song ever since then.

For Buddy Holly to write something so pure and so fantastically mutable, especially at the age of 21, is remarkable. He owes a debt to Bo Diddley for the beat, that's for sure! The song's been covered a zillion times over and each time there's something new-- whether it's Dylan's band's killer harmonies or Mick Jagger's haughty congas--  and "Not Fade Away" retains its greatness. Yeah, even in the Rush version.

Here's Dylan performing the track back on the same tour I saw him on with his kick ass band.  The sound quality's not the greatest, but I still think it rocks:


Now here's Bruce Springsteen, back when he was the hardest working man in show business, performing the song:


And of course there's the Stones:

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Merry Christmas

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, December 24, 2007 11:56pm | Post a Comment



















Mac bought daddy a Rolling Stones album back in 1983...It had kind of a naughty cover... Daddy stored some Stones clippings along with the original shrink and xmas tag...






































Quite an amazing piece, possibly Wladziu is sitting up waiting for his brother George to call to spread a little holiday cheer???
1978 cheapo release on the Mistletoe label- a subsidiary of Springboard.  A complete Springboard post is in the works...




























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GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS 2008

Posted by Billyjam, October 6, 2007 05:20pm | Post a Comment

The Rolling Stones, Madonna
, and Jamiroquai are among recent music entrants into the Guinness World Records, formerly known (up until 2000) as The Guinness Book of Records. Mick Jagger & company entered by beating previous records by earning $437 million on their Bigger Bang Tour earlier this year, while Madonna set the Guinness record for "most successful female artist" by earning almost $200 million on her sixty date Confessions tour. Meanwhile, Jamiroquai may not have earned the most money, but the band earned an award for setting the record for "the highest concert" given, by performing in a converted Boeing 737 (for winners of a competition in the UK) at an altitude of 35,000 feet. And among the other music related new entrants into the 2008 issue of the book, the band Electrasy won an award for featuring the world's biggest custard pie fight captured on film in a 1998 video ("Best Friend's Girl") of theirs that featured 50 pie- throwing fanatics (all members of the Laurel and Hardy Fan Club) hurl a total of 4,400 custard pies at each other in 3 minutes.

Finally, A Real How-To Book for Bands: Tour Smart

Posted by Billyjam, August 25, 2007 10:31am | Post a Comment
tour smart and break the band
In his recommended new book Tour Smart and Break the Band, about the real deal of touring as a band or artist, longtime drummer Martin Atkins (PiL, Killing Joke, Ministry, Pigface, etc.) tells it like it is to be on the road in a rock band, or in any band for that matter.  These days the busy author runs a record label, invents new types of drums, books bands, and teaches a univeristy course in Chicago at Columbia College about the business of the arts! The 592-page book (which is in stores Sept. 1st but available online now) exhaustively explores every aspect of touring. The highly informative and entertaining how-to book is written and edited by Atkins, who invited about a hundred music biz experts (from bus drivers to bass players) to voice their tales and experiences of life on the road for touring artists. Topics include making contracts, sketching itineries, pros and cons of drug use on the road, the importance of merchandise, sound checks, and dealing with everything from club sound checks to handling radio interviews and driving a tour bus 330 miles in unfamiliar conditions at 4AM after just leaving a gig. Atkins' guest contributors include Henry Rollins, Steve Albini, and Kevin Lyman of the Vans Warped Tour. Lee Frasers of Sheep on Drugs describes the difficulty of being on stage tripping on acid and playing his guitar, which felt to him like it was made of sponge rubber, and trying to somehow keep in the (onstage) moment.

I recently caught up with author Martin Atkins via email, to ask him about the book and also the exhibit  entitled The Religion of Marketing that he just wound up in New York City at Fuse Gallery on 2nd Avenue. It featured items that are included in the illustration-heavy Tour Smart.
martin atkins
AMOEBLOG: What exactly was at your recent exhibit in New York that tied in with the new book?

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