Amoeblog

Hip-Hop Rap-Up, Week End 03.14.14: Top 5 Chart, The Grouch & Eligh, Rick Ross, Army of the Pharoahs, Potluck

Posted by Billyjam, March 14, 2014 08:03am | Post a Comment

Rick Ross "Nobody (Explicit) feat. French Montana, Puff Daddy)" (2014)


Amoeba Music Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five: Week Ending 03:14:14


1) Rick Ross Mastermind (Maybach / Def Jam)

2) ScHoolboy Q Oxymoron (Interscope)

3) The Grouch & Eligh The Tortoise & The Crow (Empire)
 
4) Kendrick Lamar good kid, m.A.A.d city (Aftermath)
 
5) Childish Gambino Because the Internet (Glassnote)

Just as last week's number one on the Amoeba Hip-Hop Chart (ScHoolboy Q's Oxymoron) reflected last week’s number one Billboard pop album chart entry so too does this week's number one at Amoeba: Rick Ross’ brand new Mastermind is also the number one seller in the country as per the Billboard Top 200 charts making it Ross’ fifth album to debut at No. 1 nationally. The album features the lead singles "War Ready," "The Devil is a Lie (feat. Jay-Z)," and "Nobody (feat. Diddy and French Montana)" or Puff Daddy as he is ID'ed in the Vevo video version of the single above. The video for the song, which is a homage to Biggie, finds Ross recreated the drive-by shooting attempt on his life a year ago.  Other releases on the latest chart include the recurrent entries from Kendrick Lamar (good kid, m.A.A.d city) and Childish Gambino (Because the Internet).

Hip-Hop Rap-Up, Week Ending 08.10.12: Amoeba Top 5, Rick Ross, MA Doom, Karriem Riggins, Kool Keith, Keith Jones + more

Posted by Billyjam, August 10, 2012 12:30pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Top Five Week Ending August 10, 2012



1)   Rick Ross God Forgives, I Don’t (Def Jam)

While not pulling quite as huge numbers as anticipated, Rick Ross still takes the crown as this week’s hip hop best-seller and ain’t showing any sign of slowing down in sales with God Forgives, I Don't on Def Jam.  Rick Ro$$ the boss gets my vote as one of the most requested rappers from Amoeba Berkeley customers, so naturally his new official solo joint is a mover. Features songs with Dr. Dre, Jay-Z, Wale and Drake plus the prime cut beat selections you’ve come to expect from Rozay.  The special deluxe edition of album also features bonus jams with Nas and John Legend. As far as mainstream hip hop goes, this album’s loaded so don’t sleep.




2)    La Coka Nostra Masters of the Dark Arts (Fat Beats)

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop Rap-Up, Week Ending 08.03.12: Dark Time Sunshine, Batsauce, GZA, Blu & Exile, MURS & Fashawn, Zion-I @ Oaklandish + more

Posted by Billyjam, August 3, 2012 11:54am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five Week Ending 08:03:12


Dark Time Sunshine Dark "Never Cry Wolf (feat. Reva DeVito)" (2012)


1)  Dark Time Sunshine ANX (Fake Four Inc)

The biggest mover for this week is none other than the new album from rapper Onry Ozzborn and producer Zavala, which gets my vote for best hip hop album of 2012 thus far.  The music that these two craft together is something very special, and taps into the edgiest and most provocative elements of the genre in a way that few groups can. Zavala’s beats are like transmissions from a different futuristic dimension where people still bump old school hip hop on occasion, and Onry’s deep vocals fit perfectly in the mix.  Features from Aesop Rock, P.O.S, and Busdriver amongst others. Very highly recommended!



The Chicharones "Burn It Down" (2012)



2) The Chicharones Swine Flew (Camobear)

This new album from Josh Martinez and Sleep delivers more of the fun, clever, infectious hip hop you’ve come to expect from these two. These guys have a rep for amazing live shows that landed them a headlining spot on this year’s Warped Tour, and Swine Flew is an album years in the making that balances their bouncy party songs with some serious songwriting. Great hooks, intricate verses and terrific beats from Smoke of Oldominion make this an album worth checking for.  Bacon.

Continue reading...

Albums Out Today: Reissues From Blur, Yaz, At the Drive-In, Plus New Albums and Preorders

Posted by Billy Gil, July 31, 2012 01:11pm | Post a Comment
This week sees a huge set of reissues from Blur, among others ...

at the drive-inAt the Drive-InIn/Casino/Out
 
Though At the Drive-In’s third and final full-length, Relationship of Command, gets more attention for being the post-hardcore band’s breakthrough, At the Drive-In’s second album, In/Casino/Out, is the best representation of the band at the height of its powers. The album was recorded live to capture the band in its native environment, as the band had begun to make their name on explosive live shows that would lead to word-of-mouth expansion of their fanbase, and true to form listening to In/Casino/Out now feels like travelling back in time to when the band was playing basement shows, before Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodríguez-López’s The Mars Volta would play to massive crowds in the following decade. You see the beginnings of that band in how Bixler-Zavala crams verbiage into “Alpha Centauri” and the band makes the 3:13 song feel like an epic, but the live recording makes it feel manageable, most of the lyrics spat out quickly and its movements more memorable than the Volta’s proggy opuses. It’s also easy to forget how catchy the band could be, and a run of mid-album cuts proves this, including “Pickpocket,” with its instantly memorable, if incomprehensible screamed chorus. The band would also slow down to great effect on “For Now…We Toast,” which clips the distance between the band’s more melodic and aggressive leanings. But the album stands together as a whole, as well, with song after song coming at you with a warm assault of visceral guitar attacks and complex wordplay.
 
blur 21Blur Reissues
 

Blur releases a mass of reissues on LP today, as well as its Blur 21 box set, celebrating 21 years of the Britpop band. To these ears, the incredibly solid Parklife and relentlessly experimental 13 have always been the essential Blur albums, but I also have a newfound appreciation of Leisure, their first album. Before they were kings of Britpop, Blur were a fresh-faced band of whelps wielding shoegaze guitars and madchester beats into a neat package, no better than on the funk-inspired “There’s No Other Way” or throbbing “Bang.” Yes, Leisure is sort of Blur’s Pablo Honey, where the band was still finding its footing, but Leisure also stands on its own, thanks to the fact that Damon Albarn and co. had more personality than most of their countrymen in 1991. You saw the beginnings of Albarn’s experimentalism in the percussive elements underpinning the slow-burning alt-rock of “Repetition” and accordion riff looping under the dream-pop guitar squalls of “Bad Day.” Even at its most derivative, such as the “Only Shallow” aping riff of “Slow Down,” Leisure is still a an early ’90s time capsule of a record with plenty of pleasure to spare, and one that hinted at the heights Blur and Albarn would achieve later on. Maybe I just like it now because every song sounds kind of like My Bloody Valentine's "Soon." Regardless, all of the albums are worth checking out, including Blur, Modern Life is Rubbish, The Great Escape and Think Tank.
 
yaz upstairs at eric'sYaz Upstairs at Eric’s
 
In these days of excellent darkwave revivalists like Light Asylum, Yaz and its best album, Upstairs at Eric’s, seem more prescient than ever. The albums big hits all have a certain desperation that often underpins some of the best pop songs. “Don’t Go,” despite its memorable synth hook, boasts lyrics like “I turned around when I heard the sound of footsteps on the floor/Said, ‘He was a killer,’ now I know it's true/I'm dead when you walk out the door.” Vince Clarke, who penned early Depeche Mode classics like “Just Can’t Get Enough” before splitting for Yaz (and later Erasure), offers spare backdrop that favors tiny, interlocking synth riffs rather than big blankets of chords for Moyet to pour herself over. Moyet’s deep vocals hit hard throughout, especially on “Midnight” and the classic “Only You,” slow, sad new wave ballads that would be nowhere without Moyet offering some much-needed soul to a genre often saddled with wispy male vocals. Upstairs at Eric’s is a lot of fun, too, even with its more emotional tunes — Clarke’s synths mimic ’50s rock tropes and disco shimmer to great effect on “Bad Connection” and “Goodbye Seventies,” respectively, while Moyet’s exuberant kiss-offs and creepy laugh make “Situation” one of the best feel-good breakup songs around.

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop Rap Up 07:23:10: Rick Ross, Kero One, Curren$y, Take Back the Mic Bay Area

Posted by Billyjam, July 23, 2010 05:46pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 07:23:10


1) The Roots How I Got Over (Def Jam)

2) Big Boi Sir Lucious Left Foot... The Son of Chico Dusty (Def Jam)

3) Eminem Recovery (Aftermath, Interscope, Shady)

4) Curren$y Pilot Talk (Blu Roc, Def Jam)

5) Tie between three:
  -  Drake Thank Me Later (Cash Money Records)
 -  Rick Ross Teflon Don (Def Jam)
  - Nas + Damian Marley Distant Relatives  
   (Republic, Universal)

Thanks to both Inti and Evan at the Berkeley Amoeba Music, who star in the video below, for this week's hip-hop chart and honorable mentions/picks. As Inti mentions in the clip, still holding steady in sales are The Roots, Big Boi, Eminem, Drake, and Nas & Damian Marley. Meanwhile, the new entries include Rick Ross' Teflon Don, the Miami artist's fourth full length release following 2006's Port Of Miami, 2008's Trilla, and last year's Deeper Than Rap. The new album features such guests as Ne-Yo, members of the Miami-based Triple-C (Carol City Cartel), Jay-Z, Kanye West, Chrisette Michelle, Drake, T.I., and Raphael Sadiq. And in case, like me, you were fooled into thinking that MC Hammer, whose name appears on the sticker on the cover of the new CD, also appears on the new release, he doesn't; instead there is the song "MC Hammer (feat. Gucci Mane)" (audio sample below).

Continue reading...
<<  1  2  >>  NEXT