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Can Reissues Headed Our Way Starting in September

Posted by Billy Gil, August 5, 2014 10:44am | Post a Comment

can bandCan you believe it??

Krautrock titans Can will reissue 14 catalog albums on vinyl for the first time in more than a decade, starting with the classics Ege Bamyasi, Tago Mago, Monster Movie and Soundtracks. Those are out Sept. 2 on Mute.

Oct. 7 brings Future Days, Soon Over Babaluma, Landed, Flow Motion amd Saw Delight (the latter of which includes a CD).

Oct. 21 we have Can, Delay, Out Of Reach (including the album for the first time on CD), Rite Time and Unlimited Edition.

On Nov. 4 the band will release The Lost Tapes as five individual LPs. Previously it was only available as a box set.

Can was formed in 1968, releasing their debut album, Monster Movie, in 1969 with Malcolm Mooney on vocals, first introducing their sense of experimentation and layering that would go on to be perfected on the band’s masterpieces, 1971’s Tago Mago and 1972’s Ege Bamyasi. Soundtracks, released in 1970, marked the beginning of Damo Suzuki as the band’s vocalist and compiled tracks written for various films.

Can’s influence would of course go on to be felt immediately, creating the so-called “krautrock” sound alongside loosely associated German bands of the late '60s and early '70s like Neu! and Faust with driving 4/4 beats and layers of sound built around simple structures, as well as later, influencing acts such as Radiohead, Stereolab, Portishead, New Order, Kanye West and countless others. If it’s your first time to the band, these Sept. 2 releases are a good place to start.

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Summer Jams: R. Stevie Moore's "I Like To Stay Home"

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, August 10, 2013 04:05pm | Post a Comment
r. stevie moore contact risk i like to stay home lo-fi summer jams
Sometimes Summer jammin' isn't about where you go but where you hole up.

I've been on a heavy R. Stevie Moore bender of late and I reckon a good quarter slice of his massively prolific discography of eccentric DIY bedroom record-a-thons is fit for soundtracking the most sun-baked and faded of your high Summer adventures (especially if you find yourself going nowhere). We don't see a lot of previously played R. Stevie come in here at Amoeba, but I was lucky enough to cross paths recently with a used copy of Contact Risk on CD -- one of the many compilations that, what with its 21 tracks, decidedly employs a more-is-Moore approach to showcasing selected gems plucked from his cavernous catalog. But, get into this: Brooklyn based label Personal Injury has lately reissued a number of Moore's vinyl miscellany, notably Phonography (1978), Delicate Tension (1979) and Glad Music (1986), so if you're looking to go out by staying in with some old new music I can think of no better portal through which to channel your indoor summer exodus than this Glad Music banger right here: 

You've Got Another Thing Comin': 30 Years of Screaming For Vengeance!

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, August 13, 2012 11:45am | Post a Comment
speaker amp volume mastering remastered louder one spinal tap nigel tufnel heavy metal hadr rock hair band 80's parody comedy setting recording

When it comes to metal, whether it be heavy, hard, or hairy, the one thing that really hurts my feelings is a poorly mastered recording. While I admit I possess very little knowledge on the subject of mastering (however informative this link should prove) it would seem that time and inevitable technological developments have redefined what a properly mastered record should sound like, nevermind that my reckoning of a ill-mastered metal record has everything to do with volume control. Putting on an exemplary recording like Judas Priest's Screaming For Vengeance only to discover the maximum volume setting worthy of a dental visit is an insult to the ear and the slap to the id; "why can't I make this any louder", you lament. I feel your pain, people. I too am screaming for vengeance!

judas priest creaming for vengeance 2012 reissue 2cd live dvd concert san bernadino ca 1983 rob halford glen tipton heavy metal british nwobhm  classic standard louder remastered
Which is why I am particularly stoked about the upcoming September third celebratory reissue of Judas Priest's Screaming For Vengeance - the 30th Anniversary Special Edition, containing not only the remastered original album plus six bonus tracks, but also a live DVD from the 1983 US festival show filmed in San Bernadino, CA on May 29, 1983.I know, you're probably thinking, Priest has already seen to the digital remastering of most of their catalog in 2001, no? Sound hounds and intense listens have generated a clash of opinions concerning just how beneficial the overall remaster treatment was. While I don't pretend that my ears are trained to recognize minutiae apparent in the thankfully LOUD 2001 Priest remasters, my favorite complaint directed at the "creepy, crawly knob-twiddling" Jon Astley inflicted upon the reissue of British Steel compares the end result to "Edith Bunker being gang raped by a swarm of castrated locusts" -- an observation that potentially bodes ill for any serious audiophile.

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Another long overdue Lizzy vinyl reissue finally sees the Light (in the Attic)!

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, August 4, 2012 01:25pm | Post a Comment
thin lizzy light in the attic reissue repackage debut lp vinyl self titled album record phil lynott eric bell era years brian downey inner sleeve artwork extras bonus content

We the people of Amoeba Music mayn't always hear ear to ear when it comes to mutual enjoyment of preferred musical genres and styles but it would seem that roughly ten out of ten Amoeba employees agree that Thin Lizzy is the hardest, heaviest most essential band of rockers, Irish or otherwise, ever assembled. Though they are perhaps more widely appreciated for their mid-career jukebox jammers like "The Boys Are Back In Town" (c'mon, who hasn't heard this one), the Bob Seger penned rocker "Rosalie" (oft covered by Motörhead), and new takes on traditional tunes like "Whiskey in the Jar" (Metallica, schmeh-tallica), Seattle-based label Light In The Attic Records has lately seen to the proper vinyl reissue of Lizzy's 1971 self-titled debut, an album that plays like a slightly psychedelic folk tinged early dawn portrait of singing bassist Phil Lynott, drummer Brian Downey, and guitarist Eric Bell

out this week, 10/11 & 10/18: please please please let me get what I want...the smiths box set!!!

Posted by Brad Schelden, October 21, 2011 08:00am | Post a Comment

I have been waiting for this week to arrive for a long time. The long awaited box sets by The Smiths have finally arrived. There are a lot of Smiths fans out there who have been counting down the days for these box sets to arrive. We all probably have about 4 or 5 all time favorite bands. Those bands that we love more than anything else. We collect everything we can by them. We have probably owned their albums on cassette, CD and LP. We have listened to their albums over and over again. We have watched the videos over and over again. We have read all we could about them. We have spent hours reading magazines and books about them. We then later spent years looking for articles and blogs on them online. Or spent hours and hours on message boards or chat rooms. We have seen them live in concert as much as we could afford to. Assuming the band actually toured when we could see them. These bands are usually the bands that you were really obsessed with in your late teens and early 20s. At least that is how it was for me. The bands that you discovered in junior high that you then became obsessed with in high school and college. The bands that your older siblings or cousins got you into. The bands that your friends that were cooler than you found out about first.  The bands that you can't imagine your life without. They are the soundtrack to our lives. We listened to them in our bedrooms late at night by ourselves. We later listened to them late at night with our best friends and girlfriends and boyfriends. We listened to them in the car with our parents and later with our friends. We listened to them on our first dates. We put their songs on compilations and mix tapes. We danced to their songs in our bedrooms by ourselves and later at clubs and parties and at friends houses. These are the bands that helped to create our favorite moments from our past. The songs that helped us to remember those memories.

There are probably about 50 or so bands that I love and am obsessed with. But I am talking more about the bands at the top of your list. These bands for me are Depeche Mode, The Cure, New Order, The Cocteau Twins, Siouxsie & the Banshees & The Smiths. I have probably listened to these bands collectively more than all the other bands I love added together. All these bands have put out various box sets and reissues over the years. Depeche Mode gave us the Singles box sets reissued a couple of times. We got beautiful remastered 2CD version of all the Depeche Mode albums up to Exciter in 2006 and 2007. We also got a New Order box set called Retro in 2002. The New Order catalog got reissued in deluxe 2CD packaging in 2008. We got the Join the Dots Cure box set in 2004. The Cure catalog has all been reissued up to Disintegration which finally just came out last year. I am still waiting for that Wish reissue! The remastered version of Disintegration sounds just as amazing as you remember if not better! We got a Siouxsie & the Banshees box set Downside Up in 2004. Some of the Siouxsie & the Banshees albums were remastered and reissued in 2006 and 2009 as imports. But the whole catalog never got the compete domestic reissues that they deserve. I am still holding our for that too. The Cocteau Twins had a great EP box set come out in 1991. This box set was replaced by the Lullabies to Violaine set in 2005. Some of the Cocteau Twins albums have been remastered. But I would still love a comprehensive catalog box set from them as well.

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