Amoeblog

Noir City Xmas at SF's Castro Theater, December 19th

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 2, 2012 06:55pm | Post a Comment
noir city noir film foundation xmas lady in the lake holiday affair

The Film Noir Foundation, dedicated to preserving films in danger of being lost or irreparably damaged AND the organization behind the Noir City film festival, presents the third annual Noir City Xmas show on Wednesday, December 19th at San Francisco's majestic Castro Theatre! Get your tickets HERE!

The Yule-themed double bill pairs The Lady in the Lake (1947), a subjective camera adaption of Raymond Chandler's novel set during the holidays, and Holiday Affair (1949) with noir icon Robert Mitchum hot on the trail of nubile Janet Leigh.

The evening will also feature the unveiling of the full schedule for NOIR CITY 11 (1/25 - 2/3/13), the spectacular new NOIR CITY poster, and the latest Ms. NOIR CITY herself! Defying all the latest media death knells regarding repertory cinema and 35mm, NOIR CITY 11 will present its most expansive schedule yet with29 films, including three brand-new 35mm restorations funded by the Film Noir Foundation . . . and the noir lovers of San Francisco! 

But here's a little more about the films you will see at Noir City Xmas:

HOLIDAY AFFAIR 7:30pm (1949, RKO, dir. Don Hartman. 87 min.) Big bad Bob Mitchum is on the run from one of his RKO noir thrillers when he gets a job as house dick at a department store and busts adorable Janet Leigh, who's spying for the competition. Okay, it's not noir. It's a warm and witty romantic Christmas movie minus all the sappy sentiment. Hey, a little love never killed anybody!

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Double Indemnity / Blue Dahlia Fri & Sat @ New Bev

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, January 21, 2010 04:00pm | Post a Comment

The New Beverly couldn't have picked a better week to show these two Raymond Chandler greats. With post New Year's euphoria drying up (who hasn't already had at least one personal let down already?) and a week of L.A. rain, my head is in just the right space to receive Chandler's particular brand of darkness. Granted, he's not the actual writer of the original Double Indemnity story-- that would be the brilliant James M. Cain-- but Chandler and director Billy Wilder took the original novel and tightened it around the edges of the Hays code. D.I. is tight and tense with double entendres strewn throughout, ample location shots and intense performances from its co-stars-- Walter Neff is certainly Fred MacMurray's shining cinematic moment.

IMO the Blue Dahlia is one of Chandler's most underrated efforts; it's also my favorite Veronica Lake film. I'm sure that the fact that Raymond himself badmouthed it from the beginning helped set it on course for secondary status among his fans. I feel it's far superior to This Gun For Hire, which also featured Lake's co-star Alan Ladd. The Dahlia is heavy on atmosphere, quick dialogue, and features a deep supporting cast, including Hugh Beaumont, best known as Ward Cleaver, the father from Leave It To Beaver. Considering that most people only know MacMurray from My Three Sons and Beaumont from the Beav, this double feature goes a long way in showing what cool careers some of the 50's & 60's sitcom actors had before settling down into squaresville.

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Frederick's of Hollywood

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 25, 2008 10:55am | Post a Comment
So, on a walk back from the Egyptian a couple of weeks ago I had had the displeasure of running the gauntlet....Hollywood Blvd. on a Saturday Nite: females in late 80'sish formalish wear, hoar-moanally pumped young men who mad-dog everything in sight-- probably even the trees, cracks in the sidewalk and their own reflection in the windows. Hell, there were even a couple of Guardian Angles, two of the most out of shape guys imaginable. In fact, that gave it kind of retro twist, as I haven't seen GA's since 1990 or so.

Anyhow, we passed the old Frederick's of Hollywood building-- it's now another "classy" "party" palace.  The facade is still intact, one of the nicest on the Blvd, but the interior is now just another one of those places plushed up to make the bridge and tunnelers think they might rub elbows, or whatever, with Sienna Miller

I prefer Hollywood Blvd. in the day time, as it's had the same vibe for many decades.  

"Hollywood Blvd. my foot. A lot of bit players out of work and fish faced blondes trying to shake a hangover out of their teeth."
--Raymond Chandler, Bay City Blues

OK, so I rest my case. The Blvd. by day still delivers... a huge let down for tourists, a real dream ender.

A couple of days later I stumbled upon this LP with the tag intact. I thought it really embodied the yesterdays of classic Frederick's. Tacky yes, but no dream ender...










Jury Duty - Excuses Are Like _______, And Everyone Has Them

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 23, 2007 01:10pm | Post a Comment
It’s been three years since I had to report to jury duty. The last time I had to go I sat in a jury waiting room reading Walter Mosley books until they dismissed us at the end of the day. I love Walter Mosley’s Easy Rawlins series because it all takes place in Los Angeles, mainly South L.A., not too far from where I grew up. Much like reading other Los Angeles writers such as Raymond Chandler, John Fante and Charles Bukowski, I try to imagine what Los Angeles looked like years before I was born. Some of the areas that they wrote about that were once suburbs are now ghettos. Other areas, mainly downtown L.A., once inhabited by immigrants, cutthroats and hustlers of all kind, have now been replaced by unimaginative people with money displacing anyone with flavor.

I took the Gold Line from my place in Cypress Park and transferred to the Red Line that dropped me off right at Civic Center, where the courthouse is located. Once in the courthouse, the woman in charge giving the instructions for the day lost it after 10 minutes of repeating herself several times. People just don’t listen. She told people to fill out the green portion of the summons and soon several people were filling out the purple section. She told people not to ask questions until after the end of the instructions and soon several more people were coming up to her to ask her the same questions she just gave the answers to. People who work in this field must cut their life expectancy by ten years with all the yelling they have to do.

Immediately, we were called into a courtroom for jury selection. No Walter Mosley for me today. The judge explained that this particular civil case was expected to last from 30-60 days. A collective groan came out of all us potential jurors. The first thing we had to go through during the section process is going through the hardship cases. Out of a room of ninety people, seventy-five of us had excuses why we could not be on a jury for that long of a duration. The judge was reasonable. He dismissed people that were going to school, caregivers for the elderly or parents with a single earner income. Others tried to stretch the truth by adapting other people’s hardships to their own in hopes that will get them out of jury duty. At this point you've got to wonder about the intelligence of some people. You are going before a judge, a person that has to differentiate truth from fiction EVERY DAY! Do you really think he's never met a liar before? This just made the judge upset. He dismissed the liars and made them come back the next day, thus continuing jury duty for at least one more day. Those idiots left grinning, thinking they pulled one over the judge, not knowing that 90 % of us will complete our jury service in a matter of hours.

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