Amoeblog

New Year, NxWorries

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, January 11, 2016 06:58pm | Post a Comment

NxWorriesBy Double Ay

Together, Anderson Paak and Knxwledge are NxWorries. Singer Anderson Paak and producer Knxwledge deliver one of Stones Throw Records’s final releases to close out 2015 and it may be what we’ve been waiting for all year. Their EP Link Up & Suede is a must hear.

Anderson Paak and Knwxledge are artists that ought to be on your radar in 2016. Both had big years in 2015; Anderson Paak, a soul singer out of Oxnard, California, was featured on four of the 16 tracks on Dr. Dre’s newest album, Compton, and Stones Throw producer Knwxledge landed production on Kendrick Lamar’s 2015 album, To Pimp A Butterfly. Individually, both artists are pounding out music; Paak is constantly giving us new content on his SoundCloud while Knxwledge has released over 60 projects on his Bandcamp in the past five years. All of their material has been noteworthy, but the two of them coming together for Link Up & Suede has to be some of their best work yet.

Continue reading...

In the Midst of the Digital Age, Goth Money's Latest Physical Release Refreshes Rap Game

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 30, 2015 07:31pm | Post a Comment

By Double Ay

TrillionairesGoth Money Records is one of the hottest underground hip-hop collectives to have a physical album in stores in 2015. In a digital era where a majority of up-and-coming hip-hop music is over-saturated with internet releases, Goth Money wanted to switch it up. Goth Money's new album, Trillionaires, was released with Break World Records on Halloween.

Trillonaires features members Sick Boy Rari (formerly known as Black Kray), MFK Marcy Mane, Hunned Mill, Karmah, Kane Grocerys, and Luckaleannn. With a deep roster, the album is full of unique flows and styles that come together for a dark, heavy, cohesive sound. Goth Money members have all been gaining buzz while working or touring with the likes of Yung Lean and Raider Klan affiliates Space Ghost Purrp and Ruben Slikk (FREESLIKK).

I got the chance to speak with Goth Money member Break World RecordsMFK Marcy Mane about Trillionaires, their involvement with Break World Records, and where they want to go with their music after this release. I asked Marcy Mane what made them decide to release a physical album when so much of hip-hop music in this day and age is internet based. He explained it has always been a dream and goal for Goth Money Records to release a physical project since the group came together.

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Number One Hip-Hop Singles of 1990

Posted by Billyjam, March 24, 2015 09:31pm | Post a Comment
The following list of number one hip-hop singles from 25 years ago is based on a combination of sales and radio airplay and comes care of Billboard magazine who calculated the initially published charts throughout 1990 in the weekly music magazine. Some were culled from albums released in 1989 but all singles charted in '90 with Salt-N-Pepa's "Expression" (remembered by many by its repeated catchy hook "express yourself") holding down the number one slot for the longest at eight consecutive weeks from mid January through mid March that year. Meanwhile Candyman's pop rap single "Knockin' Boots" spent five weeks at number one. Interestingly Vanilla Ice's ever-popular mega hit "Ice Ice Baby" only spent one week at number one on the hip-hop charts in 1990. However it soon crossed over to the separate pop singles chart where it enjoyed much more success going to number one for 13 weeks. The East Bay based, Tommy Boy act Digital Underground's biggest hit single of their career "The Humpty Dance" was number one for five straight weeks beginning on St. Patrick's Day, 1990. BDP artist D-Nice's "They Call Me D-Nice" spent four weeks at number one as did "We're All In The Same Gang" by the appropriately named West Coast Rap All-Stars, featuring Ice-T, Eazy-E, Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Young MC, Digital Underground, MC Hammer, King Tee, Body & Soul, Def Jef, Michel'le, Tone-Loc, and Above The Law's Cold 187um & KMG, which spent a month at number starting on July 21st. Meanwhile Ice Cube, with his debut solo post N.W.A. single "AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted" from the album of the same name, spent three straight weeks at number one beginning on June 9th, 1990 - but never had an official video made for it.  Most of the others spent one or two weeks at number one. For exact number of corresponding weeks at number one to individual hip-hop single see number in brackets following title of song, all below in video format in chronological order of release as singles.

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: 1988, The Year Considered By Many As Hip-Hop's Greatest

Posted by Billyjam, March 10, 2015 03:00pm | Post a Comment

For this week's Hip-Hop History installment we rewind back to wonderfully vibrant year of 1988. It was a time when hip-hop still constantly growing, with exciting sounding new artists constantly unfurling new lyrical and musical sounds. To me '88 was part of the third wave of hip-hop - with the first wave being the (original) old school artists of the 70's/early 80's, who were eclipsed earlier in the 80's by Run-D.M.C. who ushered in the "new school" - but who themselves in turn were eclipsed by this newer third wave of hip-hop. It often seemed (and more so in retrospect) that every record released in '88 was a good record. Of course, as with any music in any time period, there were hip-hop duds released in '88 too. However overall it is fair to say that 1988 had a larger percentage of quality, diverse-sounding, influential, and timeless hip-hop releases than many other years in the genre's four-decade history. And no wonder; it was part of the time frame known as the "golden era" of hip-hop that is widely considered to be the artistic pinnacle of the art form.   I think part of the reason for this, along with the lyrical aspect of the artform still being relatively young and still being explored by new emcees like Rakim, was the fact that sampling was at its creative peak. Remember this was in the period before the infamous 1991 landmark Gilbert O Sullivan vs Biz Markie copyright case that essentially brought an end to free range sampling, and would end up in hip-hop being a little less adventurous sounding due to all the restrictions placed on it regarding sampling.

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop History Tuesday: 1986, The Year Run-D.M.C. Raised Hell And Helped Rap Crossover

Posted by Billyjam, March 3, 2015 03:03am | Post a Comment

When they arrived on the hip-hop scene in the early 1980's Run-D.M.C. distinguished themselves as the leaders of the new school of rap music. This claim by the Hollis, Queens, NY trio comprised of Joseph "Run" Simmons, Darryl "D.M.C." McDaniels, and Jason "Jam-Master Jay" Mizell was truly justified by the unique group who would be perhaps the most influential group of the genre with their hardcore rap sound. With 1984's self-titled debut on Profile Records and its follow-up; 1985's King of Rock, Run DMC were already hugely popular with fans of the then still burgeoning hip-hop music genre but it was 1986's Raising Hell  their third album that proved to be their breakthrough, crossover release. Raising Hell won them a whole wave of new fans - many of whom up until this point had dismissed rap as mere novelty and  passing fad in pop music. Run DMC's updated rock/rap version of Aerosmith's "Walk This Way" deserves  much of the credit for breaking Run DMC (and rap/hip-hop along with it) into the mainstream. The conversion of the average mid eighties hard rock fan, who up to this stage was still resistant to rap because they saw it as a derivative of the then stigmatized genre of disco, went to Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith who joined on them on both the record and in the influential music video of "Walk This Way." The result was an inspired updated rap rendition of an already great rock song.

Continue reading...
<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  >>  NEXT