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Radio Sombra's Second Anniversary

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, November 18, 2013 06:31am | Post a Comment
radio sombra 2 year 
On Saturday, November 14th, Radio Sombra celebrated its second anniversary as an Internet radio station. Radio Sombra was started by Marco Amador as an important first step in creating more autonomous spaces throughout the Chicano community. Internet radio is nothing new to the world, but it’s an important first step in the advancement of communities such as Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles in looking beyond our traditional means of expression. From Radio Sombra came Espacio 1839, an art gallery/bookstore/record store/apparel shop that houses the station. Again, nothing new to most progressive communities, but Radio Sombra and Espacio 1839 has continued to flourish without corporate sponsorship, grants, and city funding or bank loans. This enables both entities to not compromise and continue defining itself.



Radio Sombra now has over twenty shows with the archives of past shows now running 24/7 in between the live shows. All radio shows pays dues for the upkeep of the station and equipment. Each show is required to run independently, with each host getting a course on how to engineer their shows and uploading them once completed on radiosombra.org. The shows vary from social/political talk shows to music shows specializing in every genre of music imaginable. There are youth programs that teach students from local high schools how to run their own shows as well as an ongoing achieve of interviews from important voices both locally and internationally.

Saturday’s broadcast was twelve straight hours of live programming. Starting at 11 am with This Is Not A Radio Show with Omar Ramirez & Gabriel Tenorio and Ending with Heartbreak Radio with Lady Imix & DJ Phatrick at 11 pm. Other shows that participated were AF3IRM Radio, an anti-imperialist transnational feminist national women’s organization. This was followed by O Lo Siento, a 90’s noise rock revival and platform for new groups personally recorded by studio engineer Eddie Rivas. Beatific Audio followed by DJ Cezar, a mixture of jazzy funk, hip-hop and social consciousness, Small Talk From Sapo is hosted by Moises Ruiz, aka Sapo, which on that day was a tribute to all the great jazz organists, all from vinyl. Steady Beat For Lovers by Mali is exactly what the name entails, a sweet blend of Rocksteady and Lover’s Rock. Nicotina hosted by Nico Avina, always plays political fueled rock and folk in Spanish and English. I did a set for Discos Inmigrantes, an all vinyl set of my favorite jams from past shows. Social Machine Broadcast with Becky & Dewey plays mostly powerful female-led rock in the first have and punk and metal in the second half. Heartbreak Radio closed it out with a set from DJ Phatrick followed by another tearjerker set by Lady Imix.

Tropicaza's Bamerette, Chicano Rock 1960-2013 on Discos Inmigrantes

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, October 13, 2013 11:41pm | Post a Comment

Tropicaza-Bamerette (cassette release only)

Bamerette is another excellent mix tape by one of Mexico’s best audio archivists, Carlos Icaza aka Tropicaza. This is a loving tribute to the Bamer Hotel, in particular The Bamerette, a nightclub located on the top of the hotel. Located in a part of Mexico City once called the Latin Quarter, where the nightlife congregated to enjoy the sounds of the best Cuban and Cuban influence musicians of the day. The heyday for The Bamer Hotel was between 1940 through 1970 before the hotel was shutdown for good after the 1985 Mexico City Earthquake. Many underground events were thrown in the ruins of the hotel, with many saying they could feel the spirits wandering around the complex while they were there.

Tropicaza’s mix feels like you are walking through the halls of the abandoned hotel, listening to those spirits conversing in Chilango slang as they share their memories via vintage Afro-Cuban rhythms and early Mexican rock & roll. The songs of Perez Prado, Carlos Roman, Nacho Mendez, J. C. Esquivel, saturated with delay for the ghost that still roam the former Latin Quarter.

With swinging Mambos, dirty joke songs and big band psychedelia, Bamerette is more than a mix tape, it is a story of a Mexico City long since past. Much like Sun City Girls audio journals (released by Sublime Frequencies) Bamerette should be listened to as a whole, rather for it’s individual tracks.  
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Johnny ChingasTune into a new episode of Discos Inmigrantes, as we explore the sounds of Chicano Rock From 1960-2013. The first hour, wee will cover the days from the British and Detroit influenced sounds of Cannibal & The Headhunters and Thee Midniters on through the 70’s conscious rock from El Chicano, Tierra and Sapo. The second hour will focus on the punk influenced 80’s sound of The Brat, The Plugz and Los Illegals, to the 1990’s re-conscious sounds of Quetzal, Ozomatli on to today’s sounds of Thee Commons, Chicano Batman and Chicano Son. Discos Inmigrantes will air live from 8-10 pm PST on October 14th on the world famous Radio Sombra, Boyle Heights Community Radio station. Radiosombra.org. 

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Jorge Leal On Discos Inmigrantes 9/16/13

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, September 15, 2013 11:25pm | Post a Comment
jorge lealOn the next Discos Inmigrantes, I will be interviewing Jorge Leal, long time advocate of the music and culture of Latin America. I first got to know Jorge as Implacable, a writer and promoter of the Roc En Español scene in the early nineties. Jorge was the one first to acknowledge how the Roc En Español movement influenced the youth on both sides of the border. A few years back, Jorge was the architect behind the "Embrace Your Inner Paisa", which was an project based on Jorge’s acceptance of not just being an immigrant (Jorge was born and raised in Guadalajara, MX) but embracing all the stigmas that are attached to most working class immigrants that latter generations, well...frankly, abhor.

Currently, Jorge is a second year doctoral student in the History Department at the University of California, San Diego and hold a Masters Degree in History from Cal State Northridge.

In a conference Jorge spoke at back in 2008, Jorge lecture was entitled, "Yo Vivo Así, It's My Reality: How Rock En Español Started a Conversation Between U.S. Latino Youth and Their Latin American Counterparts” Jorge had this to say;

In the 1990s American rock music thrived in the suburbs under the alternative label, offering songs that dealt with teenage angst. At the same time, rock en español arrived in the Barrios of California and was appropriated by the Latino youth to create a sheltering space that shielded them from a hostile social climate created by anti-immigrant political initiatives such as Propositions 187, 209 and 227. With lyrics that directly denounced social injustices, Rock en español gained popularity and for the first time, generated close contacts among the "close others"; second and third generation young Latinos began a continuing conversation with immigrant Latino youths that came of age listening to this music in their home countries. This conversation created a new Latino youth subculture that considered Spanglish cool and fostered fads and trends derived from music, films, fashion, art and language that emanated from both American cities as well as Latin American metropolises.

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Discostan Returns Wednesday, August 22nd

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, August 21, 2012 11:22pm | Post a Comment
 Discostan Returns

D I S C O S T A N
Music from Beirut to Bangkok via Bombay

***

DISCOSTAN returns with a unique brand of glamorous shadow disco, drawn from the cross-cultural sounds that stretch from the eastern edge of the Bosphorus, throughout the Maghreb, under the Balkans, down the Bekaa Valley, and all over the Subcontinent. 


Golden-era Bollywood filmi tunes
Turkish funk and disco
Arabic dabke stompers
Balkan brass attacks
Dangdut edits
Bhangra bangers
Hot soukous

...and endless more.

*** 

SPECIAL GUEST DJ:

Bei Ru (Musa-Ler Music)
www.beirumusic.com


RESIDENT SELECTORS:

DJ Aruna Irani (Radio Sombra, Sublime Frequencies)

Gomez Comes Alive (Radio Sombra/Discos Inmigrantes)

Gomez Comes Alive Shows With Novalima & Radio Sombra's Transmission

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 9, 2012 05:29am | Post a Comment
 On Thursday July 12th I will be DJ an opening set for a great double at The Conga Room in Downtown L.A. with Novalima & Jungle Fire.

Novalima At The Conga Room 7/12For the last several years, the collective of Peruvian, European and Asian musicians have released quality Afro-Latin electro music that is often imitated but never matched. Novalima takes what folkloric Afro-Peruvian artists such as Peru Negro and Susana Baca have done previously. Yet with each release, Novalima delves deeper in their Afro-Peruvian roots and still remains relevant in the clubs. With a live band that includes both sequenced beats and live masters of Afro-Peruvian percussion, this show should be a soulful evening of dance and song. Opening the show is L.A.’s own Jungle Fire, putting the funk back into Latin Funk. The members of Jungle Fire as individual musicians have played with the likes of Stevie Wonder, Joe Bataan, Breakestra, Ozomatli, Quantic, La Santa Cecilia, Celia Cruz, and Orgone, so you know these guys are funky! They will be celebrating the release of their new 7” on Colemine Records.

Novalima w/ Jungle Fire and Gomez Comes Alive at The Conga Room
800 West Olympic Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90015
(213) 745-0162
$15/8PM

Transmission at Eastside Luve 7/11On Wednesday July 11th, Radio Sombra holds it monthly event, Transmission, at Eastside Luv to promote and to fundraise for the radio station. Recently, Radio Sombra added new radio shows by Maya Jupiter and Red Feminist Radio by the AF3IRM crew. With that in mind, our monthly fundraising event becomes even more important to accommodate our growing list of new programs. On this edition of Transmission, with have East Los finest, Thee Commons, performing live on the Eastside Luv stage. Personally, anytime a band put a “Thee” in front of their name, such as “Thee Midniters or “Thee Headcoats” I expect great things. The band does not disappoint. It a garage-y mess of Eastside rock & soul with some Psyche to boot. I will open the night with plenty of Worldly garage, soul, boogaloo and psyche. After the band, Heartbreak Radio’s DJ Phatrick and Art & Grooves’ Reyes will keep the dance party going till closing. Should be a great night of music.

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