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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Number One Hip-Hop Singles of 1990

Posted by Billyjam, March 24, 2015 09:31pm | Post a Comment
The following list of number one hip-hop singles from 25 years ago is based on a combination of sales and radio airplay and comes care of Billboard magazine who calculated the initially published charts throughout 1990 in the weekly music magazine. Some were culled from albums released in 1989 but all singles charted in '90 with Salt-N-Pepa's "Expression" (remembered by many by its repeated catchy hook "express yourself") holding down the number one slot for the longest at eight consecutive weeks from mid January through mid March that year. Meanwhile Candyman's pop rap single "Knockin' Boots" spent five weeks at number one. Interestingly Vanilla Ice's ever-popular mega hit "Ice Ice Baby" only spent one week at number one on the hip-hop charts in 1990. However it soon crossed over to the separate pop singles chart where it enjoyed much more success going to number one for 13 weeks. The East Bay based, Tommy Boy act Digital Underground's biggest hit single of their career "The Humpty Dance" was number one for five straight weeks beginning on St. Patrick's Day, 1990. BDP artist D-Nice's "They Call Me D-Nice" spent four weeks at number one as did "We're All In The Same Gang" by the appropriately named West Coast Rap All-Stars, featuring Ice-T, Eazy-E, Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Young MC, Digital Underground, MC Hammer, King Tee, Body & Soul, Def Jef, Michel'le, Tone-Loc, and Above The Law's Cold 187um & KMG, which spent a month at number starting on July 21st. Meanwhile Ice Cube, with his debut solo post N.W.A. single "AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted" from the album of the same name, spent three straight weeks at number one beginning on June 9th, 1990 - but never had an official video made for it.  Most of the others spent one or two weeks at number one. For exact number of corresponding weeks at number one to individual hip-hop single see number in brackets following title of song, all below in video format in chronological order of release as singles.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: 1988, The Year Considered By Many As Hip-Hop's Greatest

Posted by Billyjam, March 10, 2015 03:00pm | Post a Comment

For this week's Hip-Hop History installment we rewind back to wonderfully vibrant year of 1988. It was a time when hip-hop still constantly growing, with exciting sounding new artists constantly unfurling new lyrical and musical sounds. To me '88 was part of the third wave of hip-hop - with the first wave being the (original) old school artists of the 70's/early 80's, who were eclipsed earlier in the 80's by Run-D.M.C. who ushered in the "new school" - but who themselves in turn were eclipsed by this newer third wave of hip-hop. It often seemed (and more so in retrospect) that every record released in '88 was a good record. Of course, as with any music in any time period, there were hip-hop duds released in '88 too. However overall it is fair to say that 1988 had a larger percentage of quality, diverse-sounding, influential, and timeless hip-hop releases than many other years in the genre's four-decade history. And no wonder; it was part of the time frame known as the "golden era" of hip-hop that is widely considered to be the artistic pinnacle of the art form.   I think part of the reason for this, along with the lyrical aspect of the artform still being relatively young and still being explored by new emcees like Rakim, was the fact that sampling was at its creative peak. Remember this was in the period before the infamous 1991 landmark Gilbert O Sullivan vs Biz Markie copyright case that essentially brought an end to free range sampling, and would end up in hip-hop being a little less adventurous sounding due to all the restrictions placed on it regarding sampling.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Public Enemy's "It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back"

Posted by Billyjam, February 24, 2015 02:01pm | Post a Comment
public enemy it takes a nation of millions to hold us backBack in April 1988 Public Enemy (PE) released the classic album It Takes A Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back on Def Jam Recordings. And prove that it's a classic is the fact that  27 full years later Nation still packs the same punch it did when it was initially unleashed on the world back in the late eighties. Widely considered the Strong Island (aka Long Island, New York) crew's greatest work ever, It Takes A Nation... was not only one of PE's finest moments, but hip-hop's as well. Released during the much lamented "golden" era of hip-hop, the album, which was the follow up to PE's 1987 debut Yo! Bum Rush the Show, defied the stereotypical "sophomore slump" that so many artists suffered from.

PE's debut was an excellent hip-hop album but this sequel simply blew it away since it was a jaw-droppingly amazing album (of any genre) in every way. Production-wise, it was so richly layered and hardcore that it just grabbed you and didn't let go. Chuck D's militant and thought-provoking, in-your-face revolutionary lyrical flow was so powerful it scared some people. But mostly it won over new fans who still thought of rap as some fad or disposable urban pop. Combined, all the elements of Nation made up an album that was unlike anything heard in hip-hop, or any music, up to that point. I remember that summer of '88 in the Bay Area hearing it blasting everywhere I went in every type of neighborhood. I had never experienced that before!

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Insane Clown Posse

Posted by Amoebite, February 11, 2015 12:37pm | Post a Comment

Insane Clown Posse at Amoeba Hollywood

Horrorcore rap duo Insane Clown Posse have had a long, storied career, including public feuds with Eminema lawsuit against the FBI, and an album recalled by Disney the day after it was released. Hailing from Detroit, Michigan, ICP have built an empire around hip hop music and clown face paint. With a loyal fan base (referred to as Juggalos) in the hundreds of thoudands, Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope have managed to earn platinum and gold albums with little to no help from major labels. Heavily criticized for their obscene content and their emphasis on shock value, writers from just about every major music outlet have taken shots at ICP.

ICP

Love them or hate them, one thing is for sure, Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope mean business. They have founded a professional wrestling federation (Juggalo Championship Wrestling), an annual music festival (The Gathering of the Juggalos), a record label (Psychopathic Records) which reportedly rakes in upwards of $10 million in annual revenue, and The Lotus Pod recording studio. They have also executive produced several feature films. Not bad for a couple of clowns. They have two forthcoming albums, The Missing Link: Lost and The Missing Link: Found, the first of which will be released via Psychopathic Records this Spring.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Dave Paul's 1990 KCSF Hip-Hop Top 40

Posted by Billyjam, January 13, 2015 05:44pm | Post a Comment


Following my uncovering a 25 year old KCSF San Francisco hip-hop playlist (above) from David Paul I invited the longtime Bay Area DJ/promoter/label CEO/publisher to be a guest Amoeblogger this week for the Hip-Hop History Tuesdays segment and to bring us back, via his memories, to that time period (March 1990) in the genre that historically sat smack in the middle of the so-called Golden Era of hip-hop. Here is what Dave Paul had to share about his playlist from a quarter century ago - some songs with accompanying videos.

Wow, seeing this playlist brings back memories. This was when I did a Friday radio show at KCSF (City College of San Francisco) from 8am to 2am every week. It wasn’t on radio waves but rather broadcast on cable TV, Viacom 25. March 15th, 1990 was way before I launched The Bomb Hip-Hop Magazine (that wouldn't be until October 1991). First, I’ll start with the songs that I am now embarassed that I played and charted at that time: "Shake The House" by Misa: she was a white girl rapper, way before Iggy Azelea. I probably played it cause Big Ed (Sleeping Bag/Fresh Records Bay Area rep) and DJ EFX (Mind Motion’s brother) mixed it. Then there's "Somebody Farted" by Bobby Jimmy.  I probably just found it funny. I guess when you’re in your early 20’s this is hilarious. Then we have "U Can’t Touch This" by MC Hammer. I have no excuse other than he was local (same with Oaktown 357 except "Juicy Gotcha Crazy" was catchy). Now onto the tracks that I am proud I was playing back then. Here they are with accompanying videos:

"Buddy" by De La Soul - this needs no line up. Native Tongues in da house!

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