Amoeblog

Music History Monday: July 2

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 2, 2012 02:31pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com

On this day in music history: July 2, 1966 - "Strangers In The Night" by Frank Sinatra hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by Bert Kaempfert, Charlie Singleton, and Eddie Snyder,  it is the fifth solo chart topper for the veteran singer. The song is originally composed as an instrumental for the film A Man Could Get Killed by german composer/arranger Kaempfert. Sinatra's producer Jimmy Bowen will hear the instrumental through the songs' publisher, then tells them that Sinatra would record it if lyrics could be written. The lyrics for the song are then written by Singleton and Snyder. Shortly after they're written, both Bobby Darin and Jack Jones have cut versions of the song. Wanting to beat both artists to the punch, Bowen will quickly arrange a session with Sinatra. The singer will record his vocals live with the orchestra in under an hour. Within 24 hours, Reprise Records has acetates of the single rush released to radio and is on the air across the country. "Strangers" is an immediate smash and will temporarily unseat The Beatles' "Paperback Writer" from the top spot on the Hot 100. "Strangers In The Night" will win three Grammy Awards, including Best Male Pop Vocal Performance and Record Of The Year.

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: June 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 4, 2012 04:50pm | Post a Comment
To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com

On this day in music history: June 4, 1942 - Capitol Records is established in Hollywood. Founded byCapitol Records songwriting legend Johnny Mercer ("You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby," "Autumn Leaves," "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)," "Hooray for Hollywood"), songwriter/film producer Buddy De Sylva, and music store owner Glenn Wallichs (Wallichs Music City), Mercer will propose the idea of starting a record label the year before to his friend Wallichs. A few months later, Mercer will propose the same idea to De Sylva who is an executive producer at Paramount Pictures. With the third partner aboard, the three get to work organizing their first releases and opening their first offices in a building south of Sunset Blvd. By July 1st, the label will release its first nine singles. The label will innovate new techniques in promoting the sales of records, including being the first to distribute free records to disc jockeys for promotional purposes. Capitol will quickly build up an impressive roster of artists that includes Les Baxter, Les Paul, Peggy Lee, Stan Kenton, Les Brown, and Nat King Cole. Over the years, that list of artists will grow to also include Frank Sinatra, Stan Kenton, Judy Garland, Stan Freberg, Gene Vincent, Dean Martin, The Four Freshmen, Al Martino, The Kingston Trio, Nancy Wilson, The Beach Boys, The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Linda Ronstadt, The Band, Steve Miller Band, Bob Seger, Natalie Cole, Tina Turner, George Clinton, Duran Duran, David Bowie, Queen, Heart, MC Hammer, Garth Brooks, Radiohead, Coldplay, Foo Fighters, and Katy Perry. Happy 70th Anniversary, Capitol Records!!!
 
On this day in music history: June 4, 1962 - The single "Surfin' Safari" by The Beach Boys is released. Written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love, it is the bands' debut release on Capitol Records. The released single is actually the second version of the song recorded, with the band previously cutting a version with engineer Hite Morgan at World Pacific Studios on February 8, 1962. The first recording also features guitarist Al Jardine who is replaced shortly afterward by David Marks (when Jardine drops out of the band for a year), and is not released until January of 1970. The second (and released) version is recorded at United/Western Recorders in Hollywood on April 19th with band manager and Wilson brothers father Murry Wilson credited as producer. Also recorded on the same session is the B-side "409," which will also chart (#76 Pop). "Surfin' Safari" will peak at #14 on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 13, 1962.



Continue reading...

The Art of the LP Cover- Leather

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 19, 2012 05:05pm | Post a Comment
 

SOUL SLAM SF 7: Michael Jackson & Prince at the Mezzanine, 6/9

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 10, 2012 06:12pm | Post a Comment
Soul Slam SF 

A Bay Area summer dance tradition returns! SOUL SLAM SF 7: Michael Jackson & Prince rocks the Mezzanine in San Francisco on Saturday, June, 9th with DJ SPINNA spinning the best of both Michael Jackson (and his Royal Clan: Jackson 5, Janet Jackson, Jermaine, Rebbie, MJ covers, and more) and Prince (and all his Disciples: Sheila E, The Time, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Alexander O'Neal, Vanity 6, Apolonia, Morris Day, and more).

While it's not a "battle," DJ Spinna plays MJ and Prince back to back to see who reigns supreme on the dance floor. Whether you're a Michael Jackson fanatic or a Prince afficionado, your feet will be begging for mercy on the dancefloor during SOUL SLAM!


Continue reading...

Amoeba Bloggers Answer: What Was Your First Album?

Posted by Billy Gil, March 6, 2012 07:09pm | Post a Comment
I recently was at Amoeba Hollywood and overheard a customer telling an employee Davy Jones had died. I hadn’t heard the news yet. She brought it up because she was buying Katy Perry records for her daughter. She said her daughter didn’t even have a record player — she just wanted every bit of Katy Perry merchandise she could get her hands on.
 
The only artist I can ever remember being that obsessive about was The Smashing Pumpkins, but that was in high school. But it got me thinking about those first tapes, records, singles etc. that everyone got as a kid.
 
ace of base the signFor me, the first album I ever bought on my own was Ace of Base’s The Sign on cassette. I had always liked music, but at 11, I had just started to pay attention to what songs were on the radio. A friend made me a tape from the radio and “The Sign” was on it. I loved it. In the coming weeks and months, albums by Nirvana, Guns N’ Roses, Stone Temple Pilots, Green Day, and my beloved Pumpkins would follow, but really it all started with Ace of Base for me. Though if I’m being technical, I had a cassette single of Paula Abdul’s “Promise of a New Day” that I listened to constantly when I was like 9, but I didn’t buy that — I won it at a cousin’s music-themed birthday party, at which my dad dressed himself and me as Simon & Garfunkel. I had no idea who they were. I think I was Paul Simon.
 
While I’m embarrassing myself, I thought I’d extend the question to the other Amoeba bloggers: What was your first album? Not kids’ music, but not just the cool stuff, either — the tapes we once listened to repeatedly and then put away in a drawer somewhere once we realized how lame they were, though I’m still on the hunt for The Sign on vinyl. Here are their answers:
 
Eric Brightwell
the cure kiss me kiss me kiss meMy first record was Luciano Pavarotti's My Own Story, a compilation of “musical highlights of his spectacular career.” They used to heavily advertise it on TV when I got home from school, and I was hooked. My first cassette was Peter Gabriel's So. I'd liked the singles from it, but when “Big Time” came out, I was obsessed. My first CD was The Cure’s Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. I was introduced to it by a German exchange student named Ina. Before she left I rode my bike into town to a Wal-Mart to get a blank cassette to dub it. I loved it so much, I thought it warranted being purchased on CD. 
 


BACK  <<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  >>  NEXT