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Music History Monday: April 20

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 20, 2015 10:42am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: April 20, 1923 - Latin jazz and Salsa icon Tito Puente (born Ernesto Antonio Puente in New York, NY). Happy Birthday to this latin music icon on what would have been his 92nd Birthday. We love you, Tito!
 


Born on this day: April 20, 1951 - Legendary R&B singer, songwriter, and producer Luther Vandross (born Luther Ronzoni Vandross in New York, NY). Happy Birthday to this R&B music icon on what would have been his 64th Birthday.


Remembering the brilliant William "Benny" Benjamin (July 25, 1925 – April 20, 1969), drummer for the Motown Records' studio band The Funk Brothers

On this day in music history: April 20, 1970McCartney, the solo debut album by Paul McCartney, is released (UK release date is on April 17, 1970). Produced by Paul McCartney, it is recorded at 7 Cavendish Avenue and Abbey Road Studios in London, and Morgan Studios in Willesden, UK from late 1969 - March 1970. Following the recording of The Beatles' Abbey Road, Paul McCartney will work on his first solo release while The Beatles are in the process of breaking up. He books studio time under an assumed name and also records at home on a Studer 4-track recorder set up in his living room. The home recordings will be done without the benefit of a mixing board, with McCartney literally plugging microphones directly into the back of the tape machine Though no singles are issued from it, the album will be very successful with the track "Maybe I'm Amazed" becoming a major airplay hit. Eight days prior to the album's UK release, advance copies of the album will be received by the press. Inserted into the album is a short Q&A written by McCartney that in effect announces the break up of The Beatles publicly declares his departure from the band the next day on April 10, 1970. In June of 2011, a remastered version of the original album is reissued, including  a 2CD + 1 DVD archival boxed set, featuring previously unreleased material from the recording sessions. McCartney will spend three weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, number two on the UK album chart, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: December 1

Posted by Jeff Harris, December 1, 2014 11:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: December 1, 1957 - Buddy Holly & The Crickets make their national television debut on the Ed Sullivan Show on the CBS television network. The band will perform their recent number one hit "That'll Be The Day." The band will also perform Holly's first solo release "Peggy Sue" on the show. Also appearing on the same program will be Sam Cooke (making his national TV debut) performing "You Send Me," which will hit number one the following day, and The Rays performing "Silhouettes."
 


On this day in music history: December 1, 1958 - "To Know Him Is To Love Him" by The Teddy Bears hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three  weeks. Written and produced by Phil Spector, it is the biggest hit for the Los Angeles-based pop vocal trio. Written by a then 17-year-old Phil Spector, the title is inspired by a quote on his father's epitaph. The group, consisting of Spector and high school friends Marshall Leib and Annette Kleinbard (aka songwriter Carol Connors), will record the song at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood in July of 1958 at a cost of only $75. Released on LA-based indie label Doré Records (distributed by Era Records), it will quickly become a smash locally before spreading across the country. Entering the Hot 100 at #88 on September 22, 1958, it will climb to the top of the chart ten weeks later. The group will not remain together for long. Uncomfortable as a performer, Spector will prefer to work behind the scenes, quickly establishing himself as a top notch songwriter and cementing his legendary work as a producer during the '60s and '70s. Kleinbard will be sidelined from the music industry when she is involved in a serious car accident, requiring several surgeries while she recovers. Changing her name to Carol Connors, she will also carve out a formitable career as a songwriter, co-writing such hits as the Oscar nominated "Gonna Fly Now" from Rocky, "With You I'm Born Again" (for Billy Preston and Syreeta), and the '60's hot rod classic "Hey Little Cobra" (for The Rip Chords). A rock & roll classic, "To Know Him" will be covered numerous times over the years including a version by Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, and Dolly Parton that will hit number one on the Country chart in 1987. Singer Amy Winehouse will also cover the song, with her version appearing on the posthumously released compilation Amy Winehouse At The BBC in 2012. "To Know Him Is To Love Him" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: October 27

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 27, 2014 10:49am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 27, 1956 - “Ain’t Got No Home” by Clarence “Frogman” Henry is released. Written by Clarence Henry, it is the debut single and first hit for the New Orleans-born singer and pianist. Issued on Chess RecordsArgo imprint, the song will quickly establish Henry's music career and make him a staple of the Bourbon Street strip in his hometown. The rock & roll classic will peak at #3 on the Billboard Rhythm & Blues chart and #20 on the Best Sellers chart in January of 1957. "Ain't Got No Home" will become a pop cultural touchstone, later being featured in several films including Diner, The Lost Boys, and Casino, and has been covered by numerous artists over the years including a version by The Band.
 


On this day in music history: October 27, 1975 - Bruce Springsteen will make history when he Bruce Springsteen, Time, Newsweekappears on the covers of both Time and Newsweek Magazine the same week. Riding a huge wave of success brought on by Born To Run, Springsteen will find the massive amount publicity generated by his record label, and the overwhelming amount of attention he receives in the wake of it, unnerving and attempts to distance himself from it in order to maintain his artistic integrity. Before his performance at the Hammersmith Odeon in London (on November 18, 1975), he will tear down posters at the venue that bare the legend “Finally London is ready for Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band.”

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Electronic Producers Prosumer And Hunee

Posted by Amoebite, October 20, 2014 11:20am | Post a Comment
Hunee Prosumer

Prosumer is one of Europe's most renowned House DJ/producers. He was one of the first DJs to play UK Funky white labels, thus helping to break the left-field genre that takes grime, R&B, Dancehall, Dubstep and mashes it over House music. In 2011, Prosumer released Panarama Bar 03 for the Ostgut Ton label and received rave reviews from dance music critics and scenters alike. DJ/producer Hunee (aka Hunch), originally from Berlin but now based in Los Angeles, has released records through various well respected labels, including Permanent Vacation, Rush Hour and Retreat, to name a few. Both DJs are currently on tour in Europe.

Prosumer and Hunee recently visited Amoeba Hollywood and found some really cool records. It's easy to tell these two guys are vinyl pros and they dig deep in the crates! Hunee first picks up a copy of A Synthetic Life by Chicago's own Hieroglyphic Being. Prosumer follows up with a copy of the 94 East's Minneapolis Genius, which was the first official recording to feature a then unknown Prince. Showing their wide tastes in music, Hunee and Prosumer also pick up El Secreto De LAS 12 by World artist Finis Africae and Folk Jazz legend, John Martyn's One World on vinyl. From Electronica to New Age -Experimental Folk, Hunee and Prosumer find some great stuff at Amoeba!

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Music History Monday: October 13

Posted by Jeff Harris, October 13, 2014 10:33am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: October 13, 1965 - "My Generation", the third single by The Who, is recorded. Written by Pete Townshend, he will take inspration from singer Mose Allison's song "Young Man Blues." The song's crowning touch will be provided by singer Roger Daltrey stuttering like a one of the band's mod fans on speed. Produced by Shel Talmy, the band will record the song at IBC Studios in London. Recorded on three track tape, the final mono master will feature a second guitar part overdubbed by Townshend (direct to tape while being mixed) that features the song's trademark feedback. Released in the UK on November 5, 1965 (US release date is November 20, 1965), the song is an instant smash in their home country peaking at #2. Though it will only peak at #74 in the US, it will go on to be one to be one of most influential rock singles of all time. "My Generation" is now part of the The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999. In 2002, "My Generation" will be mixed into true stereo for the first time from the original multi-track tape (though it is missing the additional guitar overdub from the mono mix), which has been in the possession of Shel Talmy, and appears on the Deluxe Edition of My Generation.
 

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